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A Practical Approach to Civil Procedure

A Practical Approach to Civil Procedure (23rd edn)

Stuart Sime
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date: 05 October 2022

p. 32230. Striking Out, Discontinuance, and Stayslocked

p. 32230. Striking Out, Discontinuance, and Stayslocked

  • Stuart SimeStuart SimeBPTC Course Director, The City Law School, City, University of London

Abstract

This chapter discusses striking-out orders, discontinuance, and stays in civil proceedings. Rule 3.4(2) of the Civil Procedure Rules 1998 (CPR) allows the court to strike out a statement of case if it appears to the court: that the statement of case discloses no reasonable grounds for bringing or defending the claim; that the statement of case is an abuse of the court’s process or is otherwise likely to obstruct the just disposal of the proceedings; or that there has been a failure to comply with a rule, practice direction, or court order. A party who realizes their case is doomed is often best advised to discontinue to prevent the accumulation of further costs, but often has to pay the costs of the other parties to date. Stays are temporary halts in proceedings, and can be granted for a range of reasons. A stay is normally lifted once the reason no longer applies.

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