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(p. 72) 3. Nationality, citizenship, and right of abode 

(p. 72) 3. Nationality, citizenship, and right of abode
Chapter:
(p. 72) 3. Nationality, citizenship, and right of abode
Author(s):

Gina Clayton

, Georgina Firth

, Caroline Sawyer

, Rowena Moffatt

, and Helena Wray

DOI:
10.1093/he/9780198815211.003.0003
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date: 26 August 2019

Course-focused and comprehensive, the Textbook on series provides an accessible overview of the key areas on the law curriculum. This chapter considers the bases of nationality and citizenship, and traces the development of British nationality law, focusing on changes from 1948 to the present day. It looks at the effects of these changes on particular groups of people, characterized to a significant extent by progressive exclusion. It considers the fundamental incident of citizenship and the right to live in one’s own country, both as to the interaction of nationality and immigration law and as to the overall effect of full inclusion as a citizen. The bases for obtaining British nationality by registration and naturalization are discussed, as are the powers of deprivation of citizenship. The possibility of asserting rights as a stateless person is also noted.

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