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Book

Mindy Chen-Wishart

Contract Law offers a new approach, utilising diagrams to complement the text. The book explains the intricacies of contract law and the questions that arise during the life of a contract. Part I of the book explains what contract law is and defines its scope. Part II of the book looks at contract formation: the finding of agreement and meeting the criteria of enforceability. Part III focuses on the position of third parties. Part IV considers the vitiating factors of misrepresentation and non-disclosure, mistake, frustration, duress, undue influence, and unconscionability. Part V analyses the terms of contracts: express, implied, collateral, and examines their interpretation and enforceability. Part VI considers the breach of a contract and the remedies of termination, damages, and specific and agreed remedies. Part VII examines good faith in current contract law.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Contract Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Atlas Express Ltd v Kafco (Importers and Distributors) Ltd [1989] QB 833. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Nicola Jackson.

Book

Robert Merkin QC and Séverine Saintier

Course-focused and comprehensive, Poole’s Textbook on Contract Law provides an accessible overview of the key areas on the law curriculum. This book has been guiding students through contract law for many years. It places the law of contract clearly within its wider context, including the growing distinction between commercial and consumer contracting, before proceeding to provide detailed yet accessible treatment of all the key areas encountered when studying contract law. Part 1 considers formation, looking in detail at agreement, certainty and agreement mistakes, the enforceability of promises and the intention to be legally bound. Part 2 looks at content, interpretation, exemption clauses and unfair terms, performance, and breach. Part 3 considers the enforcement of contractual obligations including remedies, detailed treatment of damages for breach of contract, privity and third party rights, and discharge by frustration. Part 4 looks at methods of policing the making of a contract, such as non-agreement mistakes which render the contract void, misrepresentation, duress, undue influence, unconscionable bargains, and illegality. The book also includes references to relevant EU consumer legislation and introduces students to the various attempts (international and European) to produce a harmonized set of contract principles.

Book

Mindy Chen-Wishart

Contract Law offers a new approach, utilising diagrams and commentary boxes to complement the text. The book explains the intricacies of contract law by reference to the questions that arise during the life of a contract. Part I of the book introduces contract law. Part II looks at contract formation: the finding of agreement and meeting the criteria of enforceability. Part III focuses on the position of third parties who may benefit or be burdened by the contract. Part IV considers the reasons for allowing a party to escape the contract, namely the vitiating factors of misrepresentation and non-disclosure, mistake, frustration, duress, undue influence, and unconscionability. Part V looks at how to determine the contents of contracts: express, implied, and collateral terms, and examines their interpretation and enforceability. Part VI considers the breach of a contract and the availability of the remedies of termination, damages, and specific and agreed remedies. Part VII examines whether obligations of good faith should be recognised in current contract law and how that might affect the way we understand contract law.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Contract Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Atlas Express Ltd v Kafco (Importers and Distributors) Ltd [1989] QB 833. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Nicola Jackson.

Book

Robert Merkin KC and Séverine Saintier

Course-focused and comprehensive, Poole’s Textbook on Contract Law provides an accessible overview of the key areas on the law curriculum. This book has been guiding students through contract law for many years. It places the law of contract clearly within its wider context, including the growing distinction between commercial and consumer contracting, before proceeding to provide detailed yet accessible treatment of all the key areas encountered when studying contract law. Part 1 considers formation, looking in detail at agreement, certainty and agreement mistakes, the enforceability of promises and the intention to be legally bound. Part 2 looks at content, interpretation, exemption clauses and unfair terms, performance, and breach. Part 3 considers the enforcement of contractual obligations, including remedies, detailed treatment of damages for breach of contract, privity and third party rights, and discharge by frustration. Part 4 looks at methods of policing the making of a contract, such as non-agreement mistakes which render the contract void, misrepresentation, duress, undue influence, unconscionable bargains, and illegality. The book also includes references to relevant EU consumer legislation and introduces students to the various attempts (international and European) to produce a harmonized set of contract principles.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Contract Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Atlas Express Ltd v Kafco (Importers and Distributors) Ltd [1989] QB 833. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Nicola Jackson.

Chapter

This chapter focuses on the vitiating factors in a contract, namely those that can render a contract void ab initio or voidable (the distinction between void and voidable contracts is discussed). These include misrepresentation, mistake, duress, undue influence, unconscionable bargains, and illegality and public policy. Certain vitiating factors like mistake will render a contract void ab initio whilst others such as misrepresentation will render the contract merely voidable. It also shows that contracts are not beyond challenge once formed and describes several cases where the courts have held that a contract should not be enforceable despite the validity of the contract’s formation.

Book

Contract Law: Text, Cases, and Materials provides a complete guide to the subject of contract law. The book comprises a balance of 60 per cent text to 40 per cent cases and materials. Its clear explanations and analyses of the law provide support to students, while the extracts from cases and materials promote the development of essential case reading skills and allow for a more detailed appreciation of the practical workings of the law and of the best legal scholarship. Part I of the book examines the rules relating to the existence of an agreement (particularly offer and acceptance, uncertain and incomplete agreements, and consideration and promissory estoppel). Part II covers the terms of the contract, including implied terms, interpretation, boilerplate clauses, exclusion clauses, unfair terms in consumer contracts, and good faith. Part III examines topics such as mistake, misrepresentation, duress, undue influence, unconscionability, inequality of bargaining power, and frustration and force majeure. Part IV turns to breaches of contract and termination, damages, and specific performance. The last part, Part V, concentrates on third parties.

Book

Koffman, Macdonald & Atkins’ Law of Contract provides a clear, academically rigorous, account of the contract law which is written in a style which makes it highly accessible to university students new to legal study. It works from extensive consideration of the significant cases, to provide students with a firm grounding in the way the common law functions. There are chapters on formation, certainty, consideration, promissory estoppel, intention to create legal relations, express and implied terms, classification of terms, exemption clauses, the Unfair Contract Terms Act 1977, unfair terms in consumer contracts, mistake, misrepresentation, duress and undue influence, illegality, unconscionability, privity, performance and breach, frustration, damages, and specific enforcement, as well as companion website chapters on capacity and an outline of the law of restitution. Recent cases which are of particular note in this, the tenth edition, include the Supreme Court cases of: Wells v Devani (2019) on interpretation and implied terms, Pakistan International Airlines Corporation v Times Travel (UK) Limited (2021) on lawful act economic duress, Morris- Garner v One-Step (Support) Ltd (2019) and Triple Point Technology Inc v PTT Public Company Ltd (2021) on the law of damages, and Tillman v Egon Zehnder (2019) on illegality and severance, re-affirmed in the Court of Appeal ruling in Quantum Actuarial LLP v Quantum Advisory Ltd (2021). Further important Court of Appeal decisions include: TRW v Panasonic (2021) on ‘battle of the forms’, Ark Shipping v Silverburn Shipping (2019) on classification of terms, FSHC Holdings v GLAS Trust (2019) on the equitable remedy of rectification, considered within the chapter on the doctrine of mistake, and Classic Maritime Inc v Limbungan Makmur (2019) on the interpretation of force majeure clauses and the scope of the doctrine of frustration, issues which rapidly elevated in significance leading up to Brexit and upon the outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic. Notable first instance decisions which have tested frustration in light of these events include Canary Wharf (BP4) T1 Ltd and others v European Medicines Agency (2019) in the context of Brexit, and Salam Air SAOC v Latam Airlines Group SA (2020) on the impact of Covid-19. Additional High Court rulings considered within this edition include Sheikh Tahnoon Bin Saeed Bin Shakhboot Al Nehayan v Ioannis Kent (2018) and Bates v Post Office Ltd (2019) on good faith, and Neocleous v Rees (2019) on electronic signatures coupled with the findings of the Law Commission Report on Electronic Execution of Documents (2019) Law Com No 386.

Chapter

Titles in the Core Text series take the reader straight to the heart of the subject, providing focused, concise, and reliable guides for students at all levels. This chapter examines contracts induced by duress, which is a vitiating factor. It explains that duress involves one party coercing or pressuring the other party into making a contract and its most important feature is that it generally involves pressure applied by means of an illegitimate threat. It discusses the different types of duress—duress to the person, duress of goods, and focusing in more detail on economic duress and its various requirements. It explores the controversial question of whether relief should be extended to cases of lawful act duress such as threats not to contract, which as the law currently stands is in very exceptional situations only.

Chapter

Titles in the Core Text series take the reader straight to the heart of the subject, providing focused, concise, and reliable guides for students at all levels. This chapter examines contracts induced by duress, which is a vitiating factor. It explains that duress involves one party coercing or pressuring the other party into making a contract and its most important feature is that it generally involves pressure applied by means of an illegitimate threat. It discusses the different types of duress—duress to the person, duress of goods, and focusing in more detail on economic duress and its various requirements. It explores the controversial question of whether relief should be extended to cases of lawful act duress such as threats not to contract.

Book

The Concentrate Questions and Answers series offers the best preparation for tackling exam questions. Each book includes typical questions, answer plans and suggested answers, author commentary, and other features. Concentrate Q&A Contract Law provides guidance on answering questions on the law of contract. The book starts with an introduction explaining how to use the book and exploring the skills necessary for success in contract law exams. The book then looks at offer and acceptance, certainty of terms, consideration and intention to create legal relations. After that it examines terms of the contract, exclusion/exemption clauses and unfair terms, misrepresentation, improper pressure, mistake and issues relating to illegality and restraint of trade. The final part of the book looks at frustration, damages, additional remedies, privity of contract and has a short section dealing with mixed questions. The book ends with a chapter containing advice on answering coursework questions.

Book

Contract Law: Text, Cases, and Materials provides a complete guide to the subject of contract law. The book comprises a balance of 60% text to 40% cases and materials. Its clear explanations and analyses of the law provide support to students, while the extracts from cases and materials promote the development of essential case reading skills and allow for a more detailed appreciation of the practical workings of the law and of the best legal scholarship. Part I of the book examines the rules relating to the existence of an agreement (particularly offer and acceptance, uncertain and incomplete agreements, and consideration and promissory estoppel). Part II covers the terms of the contract, including implied terms, interpretation, boilerplate clauses, exclusion clauses, unfair terms in consumer contracts, and good faith. Part III examines topics such as mistake, misrepresentation, duress, undue influence, unconscionability, inequality of bargaining power, and frustration and force majeure. Part IV turns to breaches of contract and termination, damages, and specific performance. The last part, Part V, concentrates on third parties.