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Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Ivey v Genting Casinos [2017] UKSC 67, Supreme Court. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Ivey v Genting Casinos [2017] UKSC 67, Supreme Court. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Ivey v Genting Casinos [2017] UKSC 67, Supreme Court. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Robbery is an aggravated form of theft and is considered an extremely serious offence that carries a maximum life sentence and in practice attracts substantial sentences. It was put on a statutory footing in s 8 of the Theft Act 1968 and is triable only on indictment. The offence is very broad, applying to thefts in many circumstances ranging from the work of sophisticated gangs and armed bank robbers to extreme forms of playground bullying. This chapter examines robbery and the requirement of theft coupled with the use or threat of force in committing theft, and the mens rea of robbery.

Chapter

David Ormerod and Karl Laird

Robbery is an aggravated form of theft and is considered an extremely serious offence that carries a maximum life sentence and in practice attracts substantial sentences. It was put on a statutory footing in s 8 of the Theft Act 1968 and is triable only on indictment. The offence is very broad, applying to thefts in many circumstances ranging from the work of sophisticated gangs and armed bank robbers to extreme forms of playground bullying. This chapter examines robbery and the requirement of theft coupled with the use or threat of force in committing theft, and the mens rea of robbery.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Hinks [2001] 1 AC 241, House of Lords. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Hinks [2001] 1 AC 241, House of Lords. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Hinks [2001] 1 AC 241, House of Lords. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

This chapter looks at some of the offences under the Theft Act 1968 (TA 1968) and the sole remaining offence under the Theft Act 1978. It discusses theft and related offences, namely, robbery, removal of an article from a place open to the public, taking a conveyance, and aggravated vehicle-taking. Theft is governed by the Theft Act 1968 (TA 1968), ss 1 to 7. According to TA 1968, s 1(1), theft involves dishonest appropriation of property belonging to another with the intention of permanently depriving the other of it.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Gomez [1993] AC 442, House of Lords. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Gomez [1993] AC 442, House of Lords. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Gomez [1993] AC 442, House of Lords. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

John Child and David Ormerod

This chapter deals with offences against property, a category of offences that criminalise conduct such as the dishonest taking of another’s property (e.g. theft, robbery), possessing stolen or criminal property (e.g. handling stolen goods, money laundering), and damaging another’s property (e.g. criminal damage, arson). Beyond such crimes, there are also a number of specific technical offences designed to protect particular property rights, such as those relating to vehicle misuse and intellectual and/or digital property. The final sections of the chapter outline potential options for legal reform and the application of property offences within problem questions. Relevant cases are highlighted throughout the chapter, with brief summaries of the main facts and judgments.

Chapter

Course-focused and comprehensive, the Textbook on series provides an accessible overview of the key areas on the law curriculum. This chapter discusses offences under the Theft Acts of 1968 and 1978. It covers each element of the offence of theft (dishonest appropriation of property belonging to another with the intention permanently to deprive), abstracting electricity, robbery, and offences involving temporary deprivation. It discusses the meaning of ‘dishonesty’, including the Supreme Court’s decision in Ivey v Genting Casinos UK Ltd (2018), which held that the two-part Ghosh test for dishonesty no longer applies. The Law in Context feature analyses critically the criminalisation of ‘freeganism’.

Chapter

This chapter examines property offences in Great Britain, focusing on theft, robbery, and handling. It explains that these three are in the top ten list of the most frequently occurring property offences in Britain. The chapter outlines the general principles of these offences and discusses their actus reus and mens rea elements. It looks at the key provisions of the Theft Act 1968 including the s1 definition of theft in the Act and analyses the bases of court decisions in several examples of relevant cases. It discusses property and appropriation. It also discusses recent changes to the definition of dishonesty and how juries are now asked to assess dishonesty after the recent civil case of Ivey v Genting Casinos (UK) Limited (Crockfords).

Chapter

This chapter explains the offence of theft. According to the Theft Act 1968, theft is committed when D appropriates property belonging to another (actus reus) dishonestly and with an intention permanently to deprive the other of it (mens rea).

Chapter

This chapter examines property offences in Great Britain, focusing on theft, robbery, and handling. It explains that these three are in the top ten list of the most frequently occurring property offences in Britain. The chapter outlines the general principles of these offences and discusses their actus reus and mens rea elements. It looks at the key provisions of the Theft Act 1968 including the s1 definition of theft in the Act and analyses the bases of court decisions in several examples of relevant cases. It discusses recent changes to the definition of dishonesty and how juries are asked to assess dishonesty after the recent civil case of Ivey v Genting Casinos (UK) Limited (Crockfords).

Chapter

In English law, offences related to dishonesty are governed by the Theft Acts 1968 and 1978, the Theft (Amendment) Act 1996, and the Fraud Act 2006. These Acts are not a restatement of the common law and its numerous statutory additions but they do provide a code of the most important offences of dishonest dealing with the protection of property (with the notable exception of forgery and conspiracy to defraud). This chapter deals with the offence of theft. It offers a detailed review of the concept of dishonesty in light of the recent redefinition of that concept by the Supreme Court in Ivey v Genting Casinos.

Chapter

This chapter deals with offences against property, a category of offences that criminalise conduct such as the dishonest taking of another’s property (eg theft, robbery), possessing stolen or criminal property (eg handling stolen goods, money laundering), and damaging another’s property (eg criminal damage, arson). Beyond such crimes, there are also a number of specific technical offences designed to protect particular property rights, such as those relating to vehicle misuse and intellectual and/or digital property. The final sections of the chapter outline potential options for legal reform and the application of property offences within problem questions. Relevant cases are highlighted throughout the chapter, with brief summaries of the main facts and judgments.

Chapter

Course-focused and contextual, Criminal Law provides a succinct overview of the key areas on the law curriculum balanced with thought-provoking contextual discussion. This chapter discusses offences under the Theft Acts of 1968 and 1978. Theft and related offences are concerned with interferences with the rights and interests others have in property. The chapter covers each element of the offence of theft, robbery, and offences involving temporary deprivation. It discusses the meaning of ‘dishonesty’, including the Supreme Court’s decision in Ivey v Genting Casinos UK Ltd (2018), which held that the two-part Ghosh test for dishonesty no longer applies. The feature on ‘The law in context’ analyses critically the criminalisation of ‘freeganism’.