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Book

How to Write Law Essays and Exams provides a practical and proven method of analysing and answering essay and exam questions. Using the techniques in this book will not only help students write more powerful and responsive essays and exams but will also improve their appreciation of how to undertake critical legal thinking. Furthermore, the suggestions in this text will help students manage their time better, allowing them to write top essays despite time pressures. The book focuses on those questions that give students the most trouble, namely problem questions, but its techniques are equally applicable to other types of essays. In addition to providing a framework for analysing and writing law essays, the book teaches how to identify relevant legal authorities, distinguish and harmonise conflicting legal precedents and evaluate the applicability of the law to the facts of the question at hand. The book also contains specific law-related revision techniques and general writing tips.

Chapter

This chapter focuses on the development and improvement of writing and drafting skills. The discussions cover writing legal essays; the characteristics of good writing; professional writing; drafting; dictation; and writing and drafting templates.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the following: the legal system as legal reasoning; the idea of precedent; the advantage and disadvantages of precedent; the problem of the concept of precedent; the present system of precedent; ratio and obiter; finding the ratio>; the hierarchy of courts; using precedents; and the use of language.

Book

Steve Wilson, Helen Rutherford, Tony Storey, Natalie Wortley, and Birju Kotecha

English Legal System gives an understanding of the operation of the law and the legal system which is essential to the laying of a solid foundation upon which to build further legal studies. After offering practical advice on how to study the English legal system, an overview is given of the nature of law, the sources of law, how the English legal system operates, the courts of England and Wales, and some of the important institutions and personnel of the law. How legislation is made and how it is interpreted are discussed. How judges make law and how this process is governed by the doctrine of judicial precedent are explored. The rule coming from a case, the ratio decidendi, and other statements of law, obiter dicta, are explained. The book considers the impact of membership of the European Union (EU) and being a signatory to the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). The institutions and personnel of the law, such as juries, judges, and lawyers are covered. The criminal process, from arrest to trial to sentencing, is explained and analysed. Resolution of disputes through the civil courts and tribunals is explained, as is the civil process. Alternative methods of dispute resolution, e.g. mediation and arbitration, are also considered.

Chapter

Scott Slorach, Judith Embley, Peter Goodchild, and Catherine Shephard

This chapter focuses on the development and improvement of writing and drafting skills. The discussions cover writing legal essays; the characteristics of good writing; professional writing; drafting; dictation; and writing and drafting templates.

Book

Steve Wilson, Helen Rutherford, Tony Storey, and Natalie Wortley

English Legal System gives an understanding of the operation of the law and the legal system which is essential to the laying of a solid foundation upon which to build further legal studies. After offering practical advice on how to study the English Legal System, an overview is given of the nature of law, the sources of law, how the English legal system operates, the courts of England and Wales, and some of the important institutions and personnel of the law. How legislation is made and how it is interpreted is discussed. How judges make law and how this process is governed by the doctrine of judicial precedent are explored. The rule coming from a case, the ratio decidendi, and other statements of law, obiter dicta, are explained. The book considers the impact of membership of the European Union (EU) and being a signatory to the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). The institutions and personnel of the law, such as juries, judges, and lawyers are covered. The criminal process, from arrest to trial to sentencing, is explained and analysed. Resolution of disputes through the civil courts and tribunals is explained, as is the civil process. Alternative methods of dispute resolution, e.g. mediation and arbitration are also considered.