1-20 of 32 Results

  • Keyword: company law x
Clear all

Chapter

Cover Mayson, French & Ryan on Company Law

1. Overview  

This chapter provides an overview of the work’s contents. It introduces the basic ideas of company law. A company is an artificial legal person capable of owning property, being a party to contracts and being a claimant or defendant in legal proceedings. A company is created by registration at Companies House under the Companies Act 2006. A company is both an association of members (shareholders) and a person separate from its members. Members are not liable for the company’s debts. Members are only liable to make an agreed capital contribution in return for their shares. Members appoint directors to manage the company’s business and represent the company. Every company must have articles of association which set out the company’s constitution.

Chapter

Cover Mayson, French, and Ryan on Company Law

1. Overview  

This chapter provides an overview of the work’s contents. It introduces the basic ideas of company law. A company is an artificial legal person capable of owning property, being a party to contracts and being a claimant or defendant in legal proceedings. A company is created by registration at Companies House under the Companies Act 2006. A company is both an association of members (shareholders) and a person separate from its members. Members are not liable for the company’s debts. Members are only liable to make an agreed capital contribution in return for their shares. Members appoint directors to manage the company’s business and represent the company. Every company must have articles of association which set out the company’s constitution.

Book

Cover Company Law Concentrate
Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. Company Law Concentrate helps readers to consolidate knowledge in this area of law. This seventh edition has been fully updated and includes coverage of the Economic Crime and Corporate Transparency Bill/Act 2023, the Law Commission’s review of corporate criminal liability, and the Corporate Insolvency and Governance Act 2023. Case law updates include BTI 2014 LLV v Sequana SA [2022], Okpabi v Royal Dutch Shell plc [2021], Sevilleja v Marex Financial Ltd [2020], and WM Morrison Supermarkets plc v Various Claimants [2020]. Chapters examine business structures, incorporation, the constitution of the company, directors, members, corporate governance, capital and capital maintenance issues, members’ remedies, and corporate rescue and liquidation.

Book

Cover Company Law Concentrate
Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. Company Law Concentrate helps readers to consolidate knowledge in this area of law. This sixth edition has been fully updated and includes coverage of the 2018 UK Corporate Governance Code, the Wates Corporate Governance Principles, the UK Stewardship Code 2020, the Companies (Miscellaneous Reporting) Regulations 2018, and the reforms proposed following the consultation on insolvency and corporate governance. Case law updates include BAT Industries plc v Sequana SA [2019], Burnden Holdings (UK) Ltd v Fielding [2019], Popely v Popely [2019], and Vedanta Resources plc v Lungowe [2019]. Chapters examine business structures, incorporation, the constitution of the company, directors, members, corporate governance, capital and capital maintenance issues, members’ remedies, and corporate rescue and liquidation.

Book

Cover Company Law

Alan Dignam and John Lowry

Titles in the Core Text series take the reader straight to the heart of the subject, providing focused, concise, and reliable guides for students at all levels. Company Law provides an account of the key principles of this area of law. It aims to demystify this complex subject. Chapter introductions provide summaries of various aspects of company law and further reading provide the tools for further research and study. This volume includes coverage of new case law such as Hurstwood Properties (A) Ltd and others v Rossendale Borough Council and another (2021) on veil lifting, Sevilleja Garcia v Marex Financial Ltd (2020), and Primeo Fund v Bank of Bermuda (Cayman) Ltd (2021) on reflective loss; Chu v Lau (2020) on just and equitable winding up in ‘deadlock’ cases; Primekings Holding Ltd v King (2021) on unfair prejudice; Ming Siu Hung v J F Ming Inc (2021) on buy-out orders; Byers v Chen Ninging (2021) on breach of directors’ duties; CPS v Aquila Advisory Ltd (2021) on attribution; together with recent legislation including the Corporate Insolvency and Governance Act 2020; the Economic Crime (Transparency and Enforcement) Act 2022; the Rating (Coronavirus) and Directors Disqualification (Dissolved Companies) Act 2021; and the Commercial Rent (Coronavirus) Act 2022. On corporate governance, the latest developments surrounding the UK Corporate Governance Code and Stewardship Developments 2020 together with the Wates Corporate Governance Principles for Large Private Companies, the FTSE Women Leaders Report 2022 on gender diversity on boards, and the Parker Review 2022 on ethnic diversity on boards are discussed as well as climate change litigation using s 172 of the Companies Act 2006.

Chapter

Cover Introduction to Business Law

16. Company Law I  

Formation and Finance

This chapter explains how companies limited by shares are formed and looks at the contents of companies’ constitutions. The discussions cover the role of promoters in setting up a company and the meaning of a company ‘off the shelf’. The chapter examines the steps and documentation necessary to register a new company limited by shares and the rules relating to a company’s name. It discusses the constitutional documents of a company and the rules relating to its constitution. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the financing of companies. It examines the different types of shares and the issuing of shares. It also considers debentures and charges.

Chapter

Cover Business Law Concentrate

10. Company law II: directors, finance, and capital  

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. This chapter discusses the law governing company directors and shareholders. The common law duties on directors have been codified and expanded through the Companies Act (CA) 2006. Directors are responsible to the company itself, not to individual shareholders. Minority protection (of shareholders) is provided through the CA 2006 to restrict directors’ acts that may unfairly disadvantage them. Public companies must have a company secretary and they must satisfy statutory requirements in relation to their qualifications. Shareholders have no automatic right of management in the company although, through attendance and the rights to vote at shareholder meetings, they may have influence over the business conducted.

Chapter

Cover Mayson, French & Ryan on Company Law

14. Members  

This chapter focuses on the members or shareholders of a company and the way in which they take decisions on the company’s affairs. It begins by considering the rules which determine who is a member of a company and the information on the members which a company must record. It then describes the mandatory rules of company law that allow members to participate in decision-making with regard to a company’s affairs, members’ class rights and the alteration of such rights. Relevant provisions of the Companies Act 2006 governing written resolutions of private companies, meetings and annual general meetings, voting, adjournment of meetings and authorisation of political donations by companies are discussed. The chapter analyses a number of particularly significant cases.

Chapter

Cover Company Law

1. Introduction to company law  

Titles in the Core Text series take the reader straight to the heart of the subject, providing focused, concise, and reliable guides for students at all levels. This chapter presents an overview of company law, first by considering the company’s place within the various forms of business organisation. To get some comparative perspective on the relative merits of each type of organisation, three criteria for judging them are discussed: whether the form of business organisation facilitates investment in the business, mitigates or minimises the risk involved in the business venture, and whether it provides a clear organisational structure. Using these criteria, three forms of business organisation are analysed: the sole trader, a partnership, or a registered company. The chapter also explains the importance of the memorandum as part of the company’s constitution, as well as the distinction between private companies and public companies. Finally, it outlines the benefits of forming a company as opposed to the sole trader or a partnership.

Chapter

Cover Mayson, French, and Ryan on Company Law

14. Members  

This chapter focuses on the members or shareholders of a company and the way in which they take decisions on the company’s affairs. It begins by considering the rules which determine who is a member of a company and the information on the members which a company must record. It then describes the mandatory rules of company law that allow members to participate in decision-making with regard to a company’s affairs, members’ class rights and the alteration of such rights. Relevant provisions of the Companies Act 2006 governing written resolutions of private companies, meetings and annual general meetings, voting, adjournment of meetings and authorisation of political donations by companies are discussed. The chapter analyses a number of particularly significant cases.

Book

Cover Card & James' Business Law
Card & James’ Business Law provides analysis of the English legal system, contract law, the law of torts, company law, and employment law, with online chapters providing further discussion relating to the economic torts, corporate governance, the sale of goods, consumer credit, and the law relating to unfair and illegal commercial practices. All of this is discussed using relevant examples from the business environment, and the key legal cases to help develop a greater understanding of the interconnections between the law and the corporate setting. Part I of the book looks at the English legal system. Part II looks at the law of contract including the formation, terms, exclusion clauses, and remedies. Part III looks at the law of torts in detail. Part IV considers partnership and company law including business structures, the constituents of a company, shares, capital maintenance, shareholders remedies, and corporate rescue. Finally, Part V is about employment law.

Chapter

Cover Company Law

7. Share capital  

Titles in the Core Text series take the reader straight to the heart of the subject, providing focused, concise, and reliable guides for students at all levels. This chapter examines how company law governs maintenance of a company’s share capital, with emphasis on the distinction between private and public companies. It also discusses various ways in which shareholders might legally receive funds (‘distributions’) from the company, including issuance of shares and payment of shares in kind (that is, goods, property, or services rather than in cash). The relevance of the nominal value of shares issued to shareholders, the issue of paying dividends to shareholders, and disguised return of capital to shareholders are considered as well. The chapter also examines two other means of returning funds to shareholders, reduction of share capital and redemption or purchase by a company of its own shares, before concluding with an assessment of the prohibition and the exceptions concerning the issue of financial assistance for the acquisition of shares in a public company.

Chapter

Cover Company Law

1. Introduction  

This introductory chapter provides an overview of the aims of company law and governance. Company law should hold companies and directors to account, be flexible enough to respond to novel and evolving practices, provide certainty, promote transparency, help to avoid misalignment of interests, promote corporate efficiency, and help avoid corporate disaster. The chapter then looks at other key important business structures. Other than companies, the principal business structures are the sole proprietorship, the partnership, and the limited liability partnership. A sole proprietorship is a sole individual carrying on some form of business activity on their own account. Meanwhile, two or more persons who wish to engage in business together can form an ordinary partnership. Finally, limited liability partnerships were created to provide suitable business structures for large, professional firms. In many respects, limited liability partnerships resemble companies.

Chapter

Cover Sealy & Worthington's Text, Cases, and Materials in Company Law

8. Remedies for Maladministration of the Company  

This chapter discusses the functioning of directors and their duties under common law and the Companies Act 2006. Topics covered include: the scope and nature of directors’ general duties; the duty to act within powers; the duty to promote the success of the company; the duty to exercise independent judgement; the duty to exercise reasonable care, skill and diligence; the duty to avoid conflicts of interest; the duty not to accept benefits from third parties; the duty to declare an interest in a proposed or existing transaction or arrangement; remedies for breach of general duties; relief from liability; ratification of acts of directors; relief from liability granted by the court; contracting out of liability; statutory rules requiring special notice or members’ approval for certain transactions; and secondary liability (liability of third parties associated with directors’ wrongs).

Chapter

Cover EU Law

23. Freedom of Establishment and to Provide Services  

All books in this flagship series contain carefully selected substantial extracts from key cases, legislation, and academic debate, providing students with a stand-alone resource. The Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) has two separate chapters on self-employed persons who move on a permanent or temporary basis between Member States: the chapters on freedom of establishment and freedom to provide services. The central principles governing freedom of establishment and the free movement of services are laid down in the TFEU and have been developed through case law. Important developments have also been brought about through secondary legislation in sectors such as insurance, broadcasting, financial services, electronic commerce, telecommunications, and other ‘services of general economic interest’. This chapter focuses on the broad constitutional principles applicable to every sector. The UK version contains a further section analysing issues concerning freedom of establishment and the provision of services between the EU and the UK post-Brexit.

Chapter

Cover EU Law

23. Freedom of Establishment and to Provide Services  

All books in this flagship series contain carefully selected substantial extracts from key cases, legislation, and academic debate, providing students with a stand-alone resource. The Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) has two separate chapters on self-employed persons who move on a permanent or temporary basis between Member States: the chapters on freedom of establishment and freedom to provide services. The central principles governing freedom of establishment and the free movement of services are laid down in the TFEU and have been developed through case law. Important developments have also been brought about through secondary legislation in sectors such as insurance, broadcasting, financial services, electronic commerce, telecommunications, and other ‘services of general economic interest’. This chapter focuses on the broad constitutional principles applicable to every sector. The UK version contains a further section analysing issues concerning freedom of establishment and the provision of services between the EU and the UK post-Brexit.

Chapter

Cover Sealy & Worthington's Text, Cases, and Materials in Company Law

2. Corporate Personality and Limited Liability  

This chapter discusses: the company as a separate legal person; the limited liability of members; the meaning and the processes of ‘piercing the corporate veil’; statutory piercing of the corporate veil; limits to the idea of a company as a ‘person’ and particular illustrations of a company’s separate personality.

Book

Cover Introduction to Company Law
Introduction to Company Law provides a conceptual introduction and a clear framework with which to navigate the intricacies of company law. The book analyses the mechanisms through which the law provides an organisational structure for the conduct of business. Given that structure, the book discusses how the law seeks to reduce the costs of using it, whether these are costs for managers, shareholders as a class, non-controlling shareholders, creditors, or employees, identifying the trade-offs involved. This discussion takes in both the Companies Act 2006 and various types of ‘soft law’, notably the Corporate Governance and Stewardship Codes. This third edition contains two new chapters: one on liability and enforcement and the other on the social function of corporate law. Both are issues that have come to prominence in the aftermath of the financial crisis of 2007–09.

Chapter

Cover Company Law

2. The UK’s corporate law and governance system  

This chapter discusses the various sources of company law and corporate governance. The main sources of company law are legislation, case law, the constitution of the company, contract, European Union law, and human rights law. Legislation is the principal form of UK company law, with the Companies Act 2006 being the most important piece of company law legislation. However, companies are, to a degree, permitted to create their own internal rules through their constitution. Companies can also create their own law by drafting their own standard terms for use in contracts. Meanwhile, corporate governance best practice principles are found in a series of reports and codes, with the three principal codes being the UK Corporate Governance Code, the Wates Corporate Governance Principles, and the UK Stewardship Code 2020. Both of the codes operate on a comply-or-explain basis, under which certain persons must comply with the code or explain their reasons for non-compliance.

Chapter

Cover Partnership and LLP Law

1. Partnerships and Partnership Law  

This chapter describes the essential characteristics and consequences of a partnership and the derivation and development of partnership law in England and Wales under the Partnership Act 1890. It also covers the introduction of limited partnerships and contrasts both with LLPs; topics which are dealt with from chapter 9 onwards. It highlights the lack of legal personality, contrasting that with partnership law in Scotland, and the consequent problems of contemplated partnerships and continuity. Then it sets out the three essentials for a partnership to exist: a business, carried on in common, with a view of profit, contrasting partnerships with joint ventures. The chapter also considers the complications if there are corporate partners. Finally, it sets out the basic issues relating to jurisdiction for foreign partnerships.