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Chapter

Cover Family Law

10. Private Law Decisions about Children  

Parents and caregivers are constantly making decisions about the upbringing of children in their care. This chapter looks at how courts go about doing what is best for the child or children in question in any given case. It considers examples of case work and common types of application that come before the court. In particular, it looks at applications about where a child should live and when they should spend time with a non-resident parent. The chapter ends by looking at cases involving relocation across jurisdictions and child abduction.

Chapter

Cover Family Law

13. International Family Law  

Ruth Lamont

This chapter examines the legal framework governing family law with an international dimension. Given the migration of people and families between countries and legal systems, the management of family law disputes between these systems is an important issue. The chapter examines the sources of international family law, and how we connect people to particular legal systems to govern their dispute. It then considers the law in England and Wales on the recognition of marriage, jurisdiction over divorce, and disputes over children including international child abduction.

Book

Cover Concentrate Questions and Answers Family Law
The Concentrate Questions and Answers series offers the best preparation for tackling exam and assignment questions. Each book includes key debates, typical questions, diagram answer plans, suggested answers, author commentary, and tips to gain extra marks. Concentrate Q&A Family Law offers expert advice on what to expect from your family law exam, how best to prepare, and guidance on what examiners are really looking for. Written by an experienced examiner, it provides: clear commentary with each question and answer; diagram answer plans; tips to make your answer really stand out from the crowd; and further reading suggestions at the end of every chapter. The book should help you to: identify typical family law exam questions; structure a good answer; avoid common mistakes; show the examiner what you know; make your answer stand out; and find relevant further reading. After an introduction on exam skills for success in family law, chapters cover: marriage, civil partnerships, and cohabitation; void, voidable and non-marriage; divorce and judicial separation; domestic abuse; family property; financial remedies and child support; parenthood and parental responsibility; children’s rights and private law; international relocation and abduction; public law and adoption; mixed topic questions and skills for success in coursework assessments.

Chapter

Cover Concentrate Questions and Answers Family Law

10. International Relocation and Child Abduction  

The Concentrate Questions and Answers series offers the best preparation for tackling exam and assignment questions. Each book includes key debates, typical questions, diagram answer plans, suggested answers, author commentary, and tips to gain extra marks. This chapter focuses on international relocation and child abduction. The first question is an essay question that considers the law relating to international relocation, ie how the English courts have dealt with applications to relocate out of the jurisdiction (eg Payne v Payne). The second is a problem question that requires the application of the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects on International Child Abduction 1980 and The European Convention 1980, but also considers the law that applies if a child is taken to England and Wales from a country that has not ratified the Hague Convention.

Chapter

Cover Family Law Concentrate

9. International parent–child abduction  

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. This chapter focuses on child abduction whereby a parent takes a child out of England and Wales. It looks at two forms of parent–child abduction—removal without consent, and retention once consent has expired—and considers methods of preventing child abduction, including port alerts and court orders. The chapter also discusses the role of the International Child Abduction and Contact Unit (ICACU) in the recovery of an abducted child under the Child Abduction and Custody Act 1985, as long as the child is in a country that is signatory to the Hague Convention 1980, Hague Convention 1996, or European Convention. It concludes by considering extradition of the guilty parent to England and Wales.

Chapter

Cover Hayes & Williams' Family Law

Private law disputes and issues in children cases  

This examines how the courts deal with private law issues or disputes relating to children’s upbringing, such as post-separation residence or contact disputes, or other specific issues, including international child abduction. It begins by setting out some general principles for deciding children cases which are contained in section 1 of the Children Act 1989, and procedural matters relating to such cases.

Chapter

Cover Bromley's Family Law

22. International Parental Child Abduction  

N V Lowe, G Douglas, E Hitchings, and R Taylor

This chapter concerns parental child abduction, that is, where one parent takes the child to another place or jurisdiction without the other’s consent. The chapter discusses the issue both where the abduction is within the UK and where the child is taken to a foreign jurisdiction. The chapter begins by looking at the mechanisms to prevent abduction. It then considers the inter-UK position under the Family Law Act 1986 followed by an examination of the international position first with regard to abductions to and from ‘non-Convention countries’ and then with regard to those governed principally by the 1980 Hague Abduction Convention. In the latter regard it discusses the concepts of rights of custody, wrongful removal and wrongful retention and habitual residence. It then examines the making and refusing to make orders for the child’s return and ends with a discussion about the position with regard to access.