1-3 of 3 Results  for:

  • Keyword: rights x
  • International Criminal x
Clear all

Chapter

Cover International Criminal Law

6. Fair trial rights, appeals, and revision and enforcement of sentences  

There is no general law or uniform code of international criminal procedure. The International Criminal Court's procedure is still developing, and the ad hoc international criminal tribunals have their own procedural rules. However, defendants before any of the tribunals share certain fundamental fair trial rights. This chapter examines those rights and a defendant's right to appeal against their conviction or sentence. It first introduces general fair trial rights enjoyed by the defendant. It then examines in more detail the content of the right to a public, fair, and expeditious hearing. Next, it considers some of the issues concerning legality of arrest and detention, the right of appeal, and the revision and enforcement of sentences.

Chapter

Cover International Criminal Law

1. The sources of international criminal law  

This chapter provides a brief introduction to the two main sources of public international law, treaty law and customary international law. It provides a basic overview of the law of treaties and explains the special status of obligations arising under the United Nations Charter. It outlines the key features of customary international law; examines the relationship between treaty law and customary international law; and revisits the idea of whether there is a hierarchy of sources in international law, and how conflicts between international law norms are to be resolved. The chapter also discusses the relationship between international criminal law and other branches of international law, specifically human rights law and international humanitarian law.

Chapter

Cover Cassese's International Criminal Law

19. General principles governing international criminal trials  

Antonio Cassese, Paola Gaeta, Laurel Baig, Mary Fan, Christopher Gosnell, and Alex Whiting

The Statutes of the International Criminal Court, and of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda enumerate a list of rights that mirrors many of the same rights as are found in international human rights instruments and domestic constitutions. These various rights may be distilled into six minimum principles: no implicit or explicit measure requiring self-incrimination; adjudication by impartial judges; a presumption of innocence and corresponding burden of proof on the prosecutor; prompt and detailed communication of the charges and sufficient time, opportunity, and resources to challenge those charges; trial without undue delay; and a public hearing. This chapter discusses the interpretation of these rights and principles before international criminal courts, and their application to selected practical issues.