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Cover Sealy and Hooley's Commercial Law

3. Bailment  

D Fox, RJC Munday, B Soyer, AM Tettenborn, and PG Turner

This chapter deals with bailment, defined as a transaction under which a bailee lawfully receives possession of goods from a bailor for some purpose. Examples of bailment from commercial law include warehousing, carriage, the deposit of property to have work done on it, leasing, and pledge. A buyer under a sale or return transaction is, pending acceptance or rejection, a bailee of the goods. After explaining what a bailment is, the chapter considers types of bailment and three requirements for a bailment: transfer of possession; ownership remaining in the bailor, or at least not passing to the bailee; and consent by the bailee. It then examines the bailee’s liability and the burden of proof with respect to bailment before concluding with an analysis of bailment involving third parties, focusing in particular on sub-bailment.

Chapter

Cover Commercial Law

2. Personal property  

This chapter is intended to provide an introduction to the concepts that underpin the law as it relates to property other than estates and interests in land. The issues in the chapter are complex and there remain numerous troublesome areas where the law is far from clear. The chapter begins by considering some basic principles and outlining the way in which English law categorizes property before moving on to consider how ownership is best thought of as a bundle of rights over something that the law recognizes as something which can be owned. Two of the three types of proprietary claim to personal property are discussed here—ownership and possession—followed by a discussion of the nature of legal ownership, including co-ownership, along with the difference between legal and equitable ownership.

Chapter

Cover Sealy and Hooley's Commercial Law

2. Basic concepts of personal property  

D Fox, RJC Munday, B Soyer, AM Tettenborn, and PG Turner

This chapter explores some basic concepts of personal property and personal property law. It first explains the distinction between personal and real property before discussing the nature of personal property and analysing the characteristics and significance of property rights. There is then detailed consideration of ownership and possession of chattels, the acquisition and transfer of legal and equitable ownership, and attornment. This is followed by an account of the acquisition and transfer of legal and equitable ownership in choses in action and intangibles. The chapter concludes with an examination of the remedies for recovery of, and interference with, personal property and remedies available for protection of equitable property, including claims to trust assets and claims for breach of trust.

Chapter

Cover Sealy and Hooley's Commercial Law

25. Possessory security  

D Fox, RJC Munday, B Soyer, AM Tettenborn, and PG Turner

This chapter deals with possessory security. It begins with a discussion of a pledge (which normally secures repayment of a debt but, in principle, there is no reason why it should not secure performance by the pledgor of some other obligation), before considering the concepts of delivery and re-delivery of possession. It also examines re-pledge by the pledgee, realisation, and statutory control before turning to liens. In particular, it explains how a lien arises and how it is enforced, terminated, and registered. Finally, it looks at the proposed legal reform with respect to possessory security.

Chapter

Cover Sealy and Hooley's Commercial Law

12. Performance of the contract  

D Fox, RJC Munday, B Soyer, AM Tettenborn, and PG Turner

This chapter considers the duties of the seller to give a good title to the goods he sells and physically to deliver those goods to the buyer in accordance with the terms of the contract of sale. The chapter also examines the provisions of the Sale of Goods Act 1979 relevant to the sale of a limited title and the implied warranties as to freedom from encumbrances and quiet possession. Finally, it describes the statutory duties of the buyer to take delivery, to accept the goods, and to pay the price.

Chapter

Cover Commercial Law Concentrate

3. Passing of property and risk  

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. This chapter focuses on the transfer of property and risk from the seller to the buyer as agreed upon in a contract of sale of goods. It explains the difference between ownership and possession and discusses the rules on the passing of property, as well as which party bears the legal risk in cases where, for example, the goods are destroyed or in the event of insolvency. The rules relating to both consumer and non-consumer buyers are included. Finally, the chapter examines the unconditional appropriation of the goods to the contract, appropriation by delivery to a carrier, ascertainment and appropriation ‘by exhaustion’, and undivided shares in goods forming part of a bulk.