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Chapter

Cover Company Law

1. Introduction to company law  

Titles in the Core Text series take the reader straight to the heart of the subject, providing focused, concise, and reliable guides for students at all levels. This chapter presents an overview of company law, first by considering the company’s place within the various forms of business organisation. To get some comparative perspective on the relative merits of each type of organisation, three criteria for judging them are discussed: whether the form of business organisation facilitates investment in the business, mitigates or minimises the risk involved in the business venture, and whether it provides a clear organisational structure. Using these criteria, three forms of business organisation are analysed: the sole trader, a partnership, or a registered company. The chapter also explains the importance of the memorandum as part of the company’s constitution, as well as the distinction between private companies and public companies. Finally, it outlines the benefits of forming a company as opposed to the sole trader or a partnership.

Chapter

Cover Business Law

14. Legal Requirements when Establishing a Business Enterprise  

This chapter studies the various forms of business organization that are available to those who trade. It focuses on the types of trading structures available, how they are established, and provides an overview of the implications of each form of business organization. It should be noted that there is no one model that will suit every individual or every business model. It is very much the decision of the individual—having assessed the business, what they wish to do with it, and how they see it continuing in the future—to determine the form of enterprise chosen. Being aware of the consequences for the business organization is crucial in making this decision.

Chapter

Cover Business Law

15. The Administration of Corporations  

This chapter studies the various forms of business organization that are available to those who trade. It focuses on the types of trading structures available, how they are established, and provides an overview of the implications of each form of business organization. It should be noted that there is no one model that will suit every individual or every business model. It is very much the decision of the individual—having assessed the business, what they wish to do with it, and how they see it continuing in the future—to determine the form of enterprise chosen. Being aware of the consequences for the business organization is crucial in making this decision.

Chapter

Cover Legal Systems & Skills

18. Businesses and the business environment  

Scott Slorach, Judith Embley, Peter Goodchild, and Catherine Shephard

This chapter discusses the following: the importance of commercial awareness; the main types of business structure, their organisation, and management; the different markets, sectors, and industries in which businesses operate, and the role of consumers within these markets; supply chains from business to consumer; and the impact of competition within different markets.

Chapter

Cover Mason and McCall Smith's Law and Medical Ethics

3. The Governance of the Health System  

A. M. Farrell and E. S. Dove

This chapter examines the governance of the health system in the UK. In the UK, there are four health services which are often referred to collectively as the National Health Service (NHS). A general overview of the UK health system is provided, which includes examining how health policy is made and how health decision-makers are held to account, what public bodies are involved in the health system, and how the health system is financed. Consideration is given to the impact of current political devolution arrangements in the UK, which has resulted in health care and public health becoming the responsibility of the devolved administrations of Northern Ireland, Scotland, and Wales. Thereafter, each of the UK’s four health services are examined in more detail, focusing on their organisational structure, specific health initiatives, and their approach to patient safety and quality improvement.

Book

Cover Introduction to Company Law
Introduction to Company Law provides a conceptual introduction and a clear framework with which to navigate the intricacies of company law. The book analyses the mechanisms through which the law provides an organisational structure for the conduct of business. Given that structure, the book discusses how the law seeks to reduce the costs of using it, whether these are costs for managers, shareholders as a class, non-controlling shareholders, creditors, or employees, identifying the trade-offs involved. This discussion takes in both the Companies Act 2006 and various types of ‘soft law’, notably the Corporate Governance and Stewardship Codes. This third edition contains two new chapters: one on liability and enforcement and the other on the social function of corporate law. Both are issues that have come to prominence in the aftermath of the financial crisis of 2007–09.