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Chapter

Cover Business Law

12. Non-Physical Damage and Liability for Economic Loss  

This chapter continues on from the previous chapter in discussing liability in negligence for physical damage and considers the potential liability that businesses and individuals may face when they provide advice in the nature of their business, when they cause economic losses not associated with physical damage, and where the claimant suffers a psychiatric injury or nervous shock due to the acts of the tortfeasor. Recently, there has been an increase in instances of imposing liability on employers for the stress and associated health problems suffered by their employees. In the absence of physical damage, restrictions are placed on the imposition of liability for pure economic loss, although such loss has been widened to include damages for negligent misstatements. Of crucial importance is that businesses are aware of the implications of providing information in the course of their professional activities that may cause an investor or client loss through negligence.

Chapter

Cover Business Law Concentrate

6. Law of torts  

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. Tort law is the focus of this chapter. It begins by distinguishing between contractual and tortious liability. It then discusses negligence, common defences to torts, and private nuisance. Negligence involves a breach of a duty to take care, owed in law by the defendant to the claimant, causing the claimant damage. Common defences to torts are illegality, consent, contributory negligence, and necessity. Private nuisance involves unlawful interference with another person’s enjoyment of their land/property which causes the claimant loss (and the loss/damage was reasonably foreseeable). When products cause injury/loss, rather than attempting to claim negligence, a claimant may seek protection through the Consumer Protection Act (CPA) 1987.

Chapter

Cover Introduction to Business Law

12. Product Liability, Defective Premises, Interference with Land, and Defences  

This chapter discusses the difference between an action for defective products taken in the tort of negligence and an action under the Consumer Protection Act 1987. It considers the elements necessary for a claim under the Consumer Protection Act 1987 and the losses recoverable under the Act. The liability of occupiers to visitors and non-visitors (such as trespassers) under the Occupiers Liability Acts 1957 and 1984 is discussed. The chapter examines the torts of trespass to land; private and public nuisance and liability established by Rylands v Fletcher. The general defences that apply to all torts are considered, namely the defences of contributory negligence, consent, and illegality. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the meaning and extent of vicarious liability, looking at tortious actions committed by employees in the course of their employment.

Chapter

Cover Card & James' Business Law

17. Tortious defences and remedies  

This chapter examines the defences available to a defendant who has committed a tort, and the remedies that may be sought by a claimant in tort cases. Certain defences will provide a complete defence, such as consent and the voluntary assumption of risk, whereas others will merely serve to reduce the damages awarded (such as contributory negligence). Other defences discussed include exclusion of liability, statutory authority, and illegality. The rules relating to the limitation of actions are also discussed. The chapter then discusses the various remedies that may be awarded to a successful claimant, namely damages, injunctions, and self-help remedies.

Book

Cover Business Law

James Marson and Katy Ferris

Business Law provides an introduction to the subject. Packed with up-to-date and relevant examples, it demonstrates the real applicability of the law to the business world. The book is split into eight parts. After an introduction about studying the law, Part 2 covers the English legal system, the constitution, EU law, and human rights. This comprises important issues including statutory interpretation and the legislative process, and court structures. Part 3 considers contractual obligations. Here terms such as, contractual capacity, mistake, misrepresentation, duress, contractual terms, regulations, and remedies for breach are discussed. Part 4 discusses tortious liability and describes issues of negligence, nuisance, economic loss, psychiatric injury, and statutory duties. Part 5 examines company law, including trading structures, maintenance of finance and capital, and corporate administration and management. Part 6 explores the employment relationship, the nature of which will determine many important factors for both the individual and the employer. It includes discussions on the Contract of Employment, statutory regulation of dismissals, equality in employment relationships, and Statutory and Common Law Regulation of the Conditions of Employment. Part 6 then discusses agency law and the duties and responsibilities that exist for both principal and agent. Finally, intellectual property and data protection issues are considered in Part 8.

Book

Cover Introduction to Business Law
Introduction to Business Law demonstrates the relevance of key areas of the law to a world of work that the business student can relate to. Students of business often find business law modules challenging, irrelevant to their future career, and full of alien terminology and concepts. Structured in eight parts, this book provides a foundation in the key legal concepts of the English legal system, contract law, and negligence before discussing how the law affects the everyday workings of businesses and their employees from protecting intellectual property rights to company formation, winding up and insolvency. It covers a variety of topics around the subjects of the English legal system, contract law, the law of torts, employment law, the structure and management of business and the major intellectual property rights.