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Cover Borkowski's Textbook on Roman Law

9. Obligations: Common Principles and Obligations Arising from Contracts  

This chapter discusses the Roman law of obligations. The ‘obligation’, as a seminal part of Roman (and indeed modern) private law, is a legal tie created between individuals on account of voluntary interactions (such as contracts) or involuntary interactions (such as delicts). It begins with a general discussion of the nature and classification of obligations. This is an important aspect of the discussion as it links this particular branch of private law to other areas of Roman private law. It then covers the general features of Roman contracts; consensual contracts; verbal contracts; contracts re; contracts litteris; innominate contracts; pacts; and the quasi-contract. The next chapter is devoted to the other source of obligations, namely delicts and quasi-delicts. These two sources of obligations, namely contract and delict, form the substance of the law of obligations.

Chapter

Cover Legal Ethics

9. Negligence and lawyers  

This chapter examines the circumstances in which a barrister and solicitor can be sued in negligence or for breach of contract. Clients can sue a solicitor based on the law of contract, the law of fiduciary duty, and the law of negligence. In general, a client is going to face an uphill battle in suing a solicitor or barrister. In relation to a breach of contract, it can be difficult to establish the breach of reasonable skill. In relation to negligence, proving breach of a duty of care and the causation of a loss is problematic.

Chapter

Cover Legal Ethics

8. Negligence and lawyers  

This chapter examines the circumstances in which a barrister and solicitor can be sued in negligence or for breach of contract. Clients can sue a solicitor based on the law of contract, the law of fiduciary duty, and the law of negligence. In general, a client is going to face an uphill battle in suing a solicitor or barrister. In relation to a breach of contract, it can be difficult to establish the breach of reasonable skill. In relation to negligence, proving breach of a duty of care and the causation of a loss is problematic.