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Cover Family Law

8. Fundamental Principles in the Law Relating to Children  

All books in this flagship series contain carefully selected substantial extracts from key cases, legislation, and academic debate, providing able students with a stand-alone resource. This chapter, which focuses on alternative approaches to child-related disputes and their influence on English law, first considers the welfare principle and its central role in child law today. It addresses the problems and limitations of the principle, and then looks at alternatives to a welfare-orientated approach. The chapter examines children’s rights as an alternative or supplement to a welfare-orientated approach. It explores the different theoretical perspectives on the concept of children’s rights; the extent to which this approach has gained acceptance within domestic family law; and the importance of the ‘non-intervention’ principle and the possible tension between a commitment to maximizing children’s welfare whilst supporting only a minimalist role for the state, including promoting family dispute resolution in the private realm.

Chapter

Cover Family Law

8. Fundamental Principles in the Law Relating to Children  

All books in this flagship series contain carefully selected substantial extracts from key cases, legislation, and academic debate, providing able students with a stand-alone resource. This chapter, which focuses on alternative approaches to child-related disputes and their influence on English law, first considers the welfare principle and its central role in child law today. It addresses the problems and limitations of the principle, and then looks at alternatives to a welfare-orientated approach. The chapter examines children’s rights as an alternative or supplement to a welfare-orientated approach. It explores the different theoretical perspectives on the concept of children’s rights; the extent to which this approach has gained acceptance within domestic family law; and the importance of the ‘non-intervention’ principle and the possible tension between a commitment to maximizing children’s welfare whilst supporting only a minimalist role for the state, including promoting family dispute resolution in the private realm.

Chapter

Cover Bromley's Family Law

22. International Parental Child Abduction  

N V Lowe, G Douglas, E Hitchings, and R Taylor

This chapter concerns parental child abduction, that is, where one parent takes the child to another place or jurisdiction without the other’s consent. The chapter discusses the issue both where the abduction is within the UK and where the child is taken to a foreign jurisdiction. The chapter begins by looking at the mechanisms to prevent abduction. It then considers the inter-UK position under the Family Law Act 1986 followed by an examination of the international position first with regard to abductions to and from ‘non-Convention countries’ and then with regard to those governed principally by the 1980 Hague Abduction Convention. In the latter regard it discusses the concepts of rights of custody, wrongful removal and wrongful retention and habitual residence. It then examines the making and refusing to make orders for the child’s return and ends with a discussion about the position with regard to access.