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Chapter

Cover Brownlie's Principles of Public International Law

11. The territorial sea and other maritime zones  

This chapter discusses international law governing the territorial sea, the contiguous zone, the continental shelf, the exclusive economic zone/fisheries zone, and other zones for special purposes such as defence.

Chapter

Cover Brownlie's Principles of Public International Law

12. Maritime delimitation and associated questions  

This chapter discusses international law governing territorial sea delimitation, continental shelf delimitation (including beyond 200 nm), exclusive economic zone delimitation, and the effect of islands upon delimitation.

Chapter

Cover Cases & Materials on International Law

10. Law of the Sea  

The law of the sea is of great importance to the world community as reflected in the wealth of treaty law, customary law and judicial decisions concerning this subject. The most important of all is the United Nations Law of the Sea Convention 1982, which entered into force on 16 November 1994. This chapter discusses the rules governing the territorial sea and the contiguous zone; the continental shelf; the exclusive economic zone; the high seas; the deep seabed; and peaceful settlement of disputes.

Chapter

Cover International Law

18. The law of the sea  

This chapter explores the law of the sea. The ‘law of the sea’ is a blanket term, describing the law relating to all bodies of water, irrespective of whether they are subject to the jurisdiction of a State. Naturally, the seas are tremendously important globally; the seas are a crucial means of communication and trade, allowing for the transport of persons and goods around the world. The seas and their subsoil are also a valuable economic resource. However, the law of the sea is also important for its significant contributions to public international law. The law of the sea governs a series of overlapping sovereign interests and projections of jurisdiction. The basic concept is that the sea is divided into two broad categories: territorial sea and high seas. The exact line between these two has been at the heart of more than four centuries of legal developments and disputes.