1-6 of 6 Results  for:

  • Keyword: environmental protection x
Clear all

Chapter

Cover European Union Law

21. Environmental law  

Elisa Morgera and Kati Kulovesi

This chapter examines EU environmental law. It first introduces the legal framework of EU environmental policy by explaining its historic evolution, as well as its current objectives and principles. It then explores three representative areas of EU environmental law - nature conservation, water, and climate change - with a view to highlighting two trends of broader relevance to the understanding of EU environmental law as a whole: the interaction between environmental protection and economic development, and the interaction between EU and international environmental law.

Chapter

Cover European Union Law

15. Environmental law and policy  

This chapter examines environmental law and policy in the European Union, considering Union powers and the international context. It discusses the framework for Union environmental law and policy; environmental principles; European Union environmental law by sector; trade in endangered species; nature conservation; environmental protection implementation and enforcement; and environmental litigation.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: EU Law

Commission v Council (‘Environmental crimes’) (Case C-176/03), EU:C:2005:542, [2005] ECR I-7879, 13 September 2005  

Essential Cases: EU Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Commission v Council (‘Environmental crimes’) (Case C-176/03), EU:C:2005:542, [2005] ECR I-7879, 13 September 2005. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Noreen O'Meara.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: EU Law

Commission v Council (‘Environmental crimes’) (Case C-176/03), EU:C:2005:542, [2005] ECR I-7879, 13 September 2005  

Essential Cases: EU Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Commission v Council (‘Environmental crimes’) (Case C-176/03), EU:C:2005:542, [2005] ECR I-7879, 13 September 2005. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Noreen O’Meara.

Chapter

Cover European Union Law

22. Environmental law  

Elisa Morgera and Kati Kulovesi

This chapter examines EU environmental law. It first introduces the legal framework of EU environmental policy by explaining its historic evolution, as well as its current objectives and principles. It then explores three representative areas of EU environmental law—nature conservation, water, and climate change—with a view to highlighting two trends of broader relevance to the understanding of EU environmental law as a whole: the interaction between environmental protection and economic development, and the interaction between EU and international environmental law. The chapter illustrates the very broad and ambitious objectives of EU environmental law, its progressive development and its continuing challenges, distinguishing areas of the EU environmental acquis that appear at different stages of development. Attention is focused on cutting-edge regulatory approaches in relation to freshwater and climate change. This chapter also demonstrates that the study of EU environmental law would not be complete without an understanding of the role of the EU as a global environmental actor, proactively engaged in the development and implementation of international environmental law. To a significant extent, EU environmental law aims to fulfil the international environmental obligations of the Union and/or its Member States. In addition, the EU increasingly develops its internal environmental regulation to anticipate or even influence the making of international environmental law.

Chapter

Cover Competition Law

4. Article 101(3)  

This chapter examines Article 101(3) of the Treaty of Functioning of the European Union (TFEU). Article 101(3) provides a ‘legal exception’ to the prohibition in Article 101(1) by providing that it may be declared inapplicable in respect of agreements, decisions or concerted practices, or of categories of agreements, decisions or concerted practices, that satisfy four conditions. After making some preliminary comments on the application of Article 101(3), this chapter discusses the four conditions in Article 101(3). It then considers the implications of Regulation 1/2003 for undertakings and their professional advisers, and in particular their need to ‘self-assess’ the application of Article 101(3) to agreements. The final section of this chapter describes the system of so-called ‘block exemptions’.