1-3 of 3 Results  for:

  • Keyword: enforceability x
Clear all

Chapter

Cover Sealy and Hooley's Commercial Law

22. Assignment of choses in action  

D Fox, RJC Munday, B Soyer, AM Tettenborn, and PG Turner

This chapter deals with the general law of assignment of choses in action. Beginning with the historically based difference between equitable and statutory assignment, it then explains what ‘chose in action’ and ‘assignment’ are before discussing the requirement that there be an existing and assignable chose in action or right as well as the requirement that a person who holds an existing assignable chose in action intends to assign it. It also examines whether and when a rule of legal formality requires writing to be made; whether and when notice of the assignment is required; and obstacles to the enforcement of an assigned chose in action.

Chapter

Cover Sealy and Hooley's Commercial Law

19. Bills of exchange  

D Fox, RJC Munday, B Soyer, AM Tettenborn, and PG Turner

This chapter focuses on bills of exchange, especially in the context of international trade. It first provides an overview of how bills of exchange are used as a method of payment before discussing the relevant provisions of the Bills of Exchange Act 1882. It then considers the definition of a bill of exchange, how a bill of exchange is transferred, and persons entitled to the benefit of the obligation on the bill. It also examines the general principles governing liability on the bill of exchange as well as the enforcement and discharge of the bill. Finally, it looks at mistaken payment, focusing on cases where the payment was received in good faith and in ignorance of the mistake.

Chapter

Cover Commercial Law

10. An introduction to the sale of goods  

This chapter discusses the law relating to the sale of goods, which lies at the heart of commercial law and regulates sales of different kinds from domestic retail to cross-border internet transactions. Sale of goods law also lies at the heart of other aspects of commercial law, such as the law of agency, where agents are often appointed solely for the purpose of selling their principal’s goods. Contracts for finance and for insurance are further examples of transactions that often depend on the sale of goods for their entire purpose. It must be noted that a contract of sale is still a contract, even if it has special features. Therefore, all elements for establishing the contract must be present, these being offer, acceptance, consideration, certainty, and the intention to create legal relations.