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Chapter

Cover Employment Law in Context

1. Introduction to Employment Law  

This chapter provides an overview of the fundamental goals of this text. It introduces readers to the running case study feature which is used throughout the text to explain concepts and rules of employment law. It then discusses key issues and themes in employment law. It considers whether labour law has a valid claim to be treated as a self-contained discipline and what distinguishes it from other branches of the law. It explores the role of this area of law and the arguments in favour of the introduction and preservation of such laws. It also addresses a central area of controversy, which is whether such laws stifle or stimulate economic growth. The final issue for discussion is the potential impact of technology-driven workplace changes on employment laws, e.g. automation, AI, etc.

Chapter

Cover Smith & Wood's Employment Law

1. Introduction  

This book focuses on employment law, which has been the subject of as rapid a transformation as can have happened to any legal subject in recent times, and is certainly one of the most difficult areas of law in which to keep up to date. In some ways employment law is a curious mixture of ancient and modern, for much old law lies behind or at the basis of new statutory law and in some cases the old law continues to exist alongside the new. The subject is, however, unrecognizable from what it was only 40 years ago, with the enormous increase in statute law and the ever-increasing volume of case law on the modern statutes. Thus, the intending student must be able to exercise the lawyer’s skill in dealing with both extensive case law and major statutes, sometimes of astounding complexity. As well as setting out the history of this area of law, this chapter covers important background features of procedure and the enforcement of the law through tribunals, including significant developments such as ACAS early conciliation, the fiasco over tribunal fees, and possible future reforms to the system of adjudication.

Chapter

Cover Smith & Wood's Employment Law

1. Introduction  

Ian Smith, Owen Warnock, and Gemma Mitchell

This book focuses on employment law, which has been the subject of as rapid a transformation as can have happened to any legal subject in recent times, and is certainly one of the most difficult areas of law in which to keep up to date. In some ways employment law is a curious mixture of ancient and modern, for much old law lies behind or at the basis of new statutory law and in some cases the old law continues to exist alongside the new. The subject is, however, unrecognizable from what it was only 40 years ago, with the enormous increase in statute law and the ever-increasing volume of case law on the modern statutes. Thus, the intending student must be able to exercise the lawyer’s skill in dealing with both extensive case law and major statutes, sometimes of astounding complexity. As well as setting out the history of this area of law, this chapter covers important background features of procedure and the enforcement of the law through tribunals, including significant developments such as ACAS early conciliation, the fiasco over tribunal fees, and possible future reforms to the system of adjudication.