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Chapter

Cover Tort Law: Text and Materials

11. Special Liability Regimes  

Although much of the law of tort is based upon general common law principles, there are a number of situations where special liability regimes have been created. This chapter focuses on four of these special liability regimes. The first regime to be considered is employers’ liability, whose origins lie in nineteenth-century common law. Two other special regimes are then considered: the liability of occupiers to those coming onto their land (governed by the Occupiers’ Liability Acts of 1957 and 1984) and liability in respect of defective products (governed by the Consumer Protection Act 1987). In both these areas Parliament has intervened to remedy perceived failings in the common law. The final part of this chapter considers the common law action for breach of statutory duty. This differs from the action for negligence in that the source of the defendant’s duty is not the common law; rather, the claimant’s case is founded on a breach of a duty imposed on the defendant by Parliament.

Chapter

Cover An Introduction to Tort Law

7. Contribution Between Tortfeasors  

Celebrated for their conceptual clarity, titles in the Clarendon Law Series offer concise, accessible overviews of major fields of law and legal thought. This chapter considers cases involving several torts and severable persons who are liable. It describes ‘joint and several liability’, where several different torts may be contributing to the same harm and several persons are liable for what they have independently done, since in principle, everyone whose tortious conduct has contributed to the occurrence of harm is liable to be sued for the full amount of that harm, provided it is indivisible and not too remote. The chapter also discusses how a tortfeasor who is sued and wishes to claim contribution should bring any other supposed tortfeasor into the victim's suit. Likewise, the victim should sue every plausible tortfeasor, because if he brings a second action in respect of the same damage he risks being penalised in costs, and if he loses against one defendant and succeeds against another, he will get all his costs paid by the latter.

Book

Cover Tort Law: Text and Materials

Mark Lunney, Donal Nolan, and Ken Oliphant

Tort Law: Text and Materials brings together a selection of carefully chosen extracts from cases and materials, with extensive commentary. Each section begins with a clear overview of the law, followed by illustrative extracts from case law and from government reports and scholarly literature, which are supported by explanation and analysis. The authors start by introducing the subject, and then examine intentional interference with the person before moving on to liability for negligence. Their analysis provides an overview of negligence liability in general, and then addresses in turn breach of duty, causation and remoteness, defences to negligence, and specific duty of care issues (psychiatric illness, economic loss, omissions and acts of third parties, and public bodies). In the following chapter, the authors consider the special liability regimes for employers and occupiers, as well as product liability and breach of statutory duty. The focus then switches to nuisance and the rule in Rylands v Fletcher, defamation, and privacy, before turning to vicarious liability, and damages for personal injury and death. Finally, they explore how tort works in practice.

Chapter

Cover Tort Law Directions

8. Employers’ liability and non-delegable duties  

Without assuming prior legal knowledge, books in the Directions series introduce and guide readers through key points of law and legal debate. Questions, diagrams, and exercises help readers to engage fully with each subject and check their understanding as they progress. Employment contracts implicitly require an employer to take all reasonable care to ensure the health and safety of his or her employees. An employee who suffers an injury due to the tort of another employee may make the employer vicariously liable. In addition, the employer has a personal non-delegable duty of care to ensure that his employees are safe in the workplace. This chapter looks at the various sources of employers’ liability for workplace accidents and discusses the distinction between vicarious liability and personal liability. It also examines the non-delegable nature of the employer’s duty and considers developments in employer’s liability for occupational stress.

Chapter

Cover An Introduction to Tort Law

6. Vicarious Liability  

Celebrated for their conceptual clarity, titles in the Clarendon Law Series offer concise, accessible overviews of major fields of law and legal thought. This chapter discusses the law on vicarious liability. In principle, a person is not liable in negligence unless he is in breach of a duty owed by him to the claimant. Quite often, however, a person who is not in breach of any duty incumbent on himself is nevertheless liable, and strictly liable, for torts committed by someone else. His liability is then said to be ‘vicarious’. The principal instance of vicarious liability is that of the employer for his employees. Persons may also be liable for those engaged in a joint enterprise with them, whether as fellow conspirator or partner in a firm.

Chapter

Cover Markesinis & Deakin's Tort Law

18. Employer’s Liability  

The liability of an employer to an employee has two aspects. There is liability to employees for harm suffered by them, and liability for harm caused by them in the course of their employment (vicarious liability, covered in chapter 19). Both represent forms of stricter liability. This chapter discusses the negligence law liability of employers, liabilities arising from statutory duties, and related aspects of social security law. It analyses the concept of the non-delegable duty in the employment context. It also discusses the implications for employer’s liability of reforms made to the law of breach of statutory duty in the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Act 2013.

Chapter

Cover Markesinis & Deakin's Tort Law

19. Vicarious Liability and Non-Delegable Duties  

Vicarious liability is liability imposed on an employer to a third party for the tort of his employee committed in the course of employment. Vicarious liability is another instance of stricter liability in the sense that the employer who is not at fault is made responsible for the employee’s default. It thereby gives the injured party compensation from the person who is better able to pay and spread the cost of the injury, namely the employer. Anyone who wishes to hold an employer vicariously liable must prove: that the wrongdoer was his employee, or that the relationship between them was ‘akin’ to employment; that he committed a tort; and that he committed it in the course of his employment. This chapter discusses each of this in turn. It also considers contribution between employer and employee; liability for the torts of independent contractors; the expanding categories of non-delegable duties; and the changing contours of employer’s liability.

Chapter

Cover Tort Law Directions

9. Vicarious liability  

Without assuming prior legal knowledge, books in the Directions series introduce and guide readers through key points of law and legal debate. Questions, diagrams, and exercises help readers to engage fully with each subject and check their understanding as they progress. In general, liability is based on the personal fault of the wrongdoer himself. A person is liable only for his own acts, and a defendant will usually be free of any liability unless he has negligently or intentionally caused the harm or damage to the claimant. However, a person who has no fault or personal blame may also be held liable for the damage caused by the tort of another. This is known as vicarious liability, which is most common in the workplace and imposes liability without the need to prove that the defendant is at fault.

Chapter

Cover Casebook on Tort Law

18. Vicarious liability  

Vicarious liability is a system whereby an employer is liable for the torts of his employees committed in the course of employment. The principle of placing liability on the employer as well as upon the individual tortfeasor is mainly justified by the concept of loss distribution; that is, that the employer will usually be better able to distribute the loss, either through insurance or through his customers. This chapter begins with a definition of an employee. It then discusses the liability of the employee; how an employer is liable for the torts of his employee only if the act is committed ‘in the course of his employment‘; and liability for independent contractors.

Book

Cover Concentrate Questions and Answers Tort Law
Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. Concentrate Questions and Answers Tort Law aims to provide the skills for success in exams in this area of law. It starts off by looking at negligence in terms of duty of care, breach of duty and causation and remoteness of damage. It then looks at employers’ liability and vicarious liability. It also considers product and occupiers liabilities. It examines intentional torts. It looks at the case Rylands v Fletcher. General defences and damages are also considered. Finally, it provides mix topic questions and looks at coursework assessments.

Chapter

Cover Concentrate Questions and Answers Tort Law

5. Employers’ Liability and Vicarious Liability  

Dr Karen Dyer and Dr Anil Balan

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. This chapter discusses the law on employers’ liability and vicarious liability. To answer questions on this topic, students need to understand the following: tort of negligence; statutory duties, and the effect of breach of statutory duty; the Employers’ Liability (Defective Equipment) Act 1969; vicarious liability, and specifically The Catholic Child Welfare Society and others v Various Claimants and The Institute of the Brothers of the Christian Schools [2012] UKSC 56; and defences to negligence.

Chapter

Cover Tort Law Concentrate

9. Employers’ liability and vicarious liability  

This chapter discusses both common law and statute on employers’ liability and vicarious liability. Employers’ liability is concerned with the employer’s personal, non-delegable duty in respect of the physical and psychological safety of his employees. This was established in Wilsons and Clyde Coal v English (1938) and is reinforced by the statutory requirement that employers have compulsory insurance. Vicarious liability involves the employer being liable to a third party for the tort of his employee. This must occur in the course of employment, a concept which was redefined in Lister v Hesley Hall (2002). The employment relationship has been re-examined in the light of institutional child abuse cases.