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Chapter

Cover Employment Law

1. The rise of employment law  

This chapter defines some key terms and then focuses on the two questions that are most often debated when people consider the revolution in employment regulation that has occurred in recent decades: Why have we seen such a growth in the extent to which the employment relationship is regulated in the UK? What are the advantages and disadvantages of increased employment regulation for the UK’s economy and people? In answering these questions the chapter introduces some of the major themes which underpin the evaluative material in this text. It also considers attempts made by recent governments to lessen the burden of regulation on employers, most of which have been widely perceived as having had, at best, very limited effect. Finally, it considers the consequences and impact of how employment tribunal fees before they were abolished, and looks at the decline in membership of trade unions and its effect.

Chapter

Cover Employment Law

15. Religious discrimination  

This chapter deals with religious discrimination law under the Equality Act. It discusses the historical background of religious discrimination law, protected characteristics, prohibited conduct on grounds of religious discrimination,. Religion and belief is not specifically defined in the statute, and is left for the courts to define. Atheists are protected, but beliefs which ‘conflict with the fundamental rights of others’ are not. Dress codes are one of the most contested topics in this area of law. There are also specific exceptions for religious employers. The chapter also considers the conflict and competing interests between religious discrimination and other protected characteristics, such as sexual orientation and gender reassignment.

Chapter

Cover Selwyn's Law of Employment

13. Continuous Employment  

The statutory provisions for continuity of employment are contained in ss 210–219 of the Employment Rights Act 1996 and the Employment Protection (Continuity of Employment) Regulations 1996. Continuity of employment is a statutory concept generally used, first, to determine whether an employee has been employed for a particular length of time so as to qualify for a specific statutory right, and, second, to ascertain the employee’s length of employment for the purpose of obtaining certain financial benefits award and a redundancy payment. This chapter discusses provisions for counting and computing continuity (ERA, ss 210–219) 362)); preserving continuity (s 212); weeks which do not count towards continuity (ss 215–217); change of employer (s 218); and effect of the continuity rules.

Chapter

Cover Employment Law

28. Consultation and bargaining  

This chapter looks at the regulation of collective bargaining and at ways in which employers can, in certain circumstances, be required in law to recognise trade unions and to consult collectively with their workforces. After briefly considering why the UK maintains a tradition of voluntarism as far as collective bargaining and collective agreements are concerned, it goes on to assess the work of the Central Arbitration Committee—the authority which has the major enforcing role in respect of the law in this field. This is followed by an analysis of four distinct, but interrelated areas of regulation: disclosure of information for collective bargaining purposes, compulsory union recognition, European Works Councils and the Information and Consultation Regulations.

Chapter

Cover Employment Law

8. Implied terms  

This chapter looks at the terms which are implied into contracts of employment. Implied terms are those that are deemed to be present by a court despite never having been explicitly agreed or even discussed by the employer or employee. The chapter begins by setting out the different types of implied term, differentiating these from other types of terms, before going on to explore the major implied terms and their significance. It focuses in particular on the duty to maintain a relationship of mutual trust and confidence as this is the area in which the most significant legal developments have occurred. It then considers situations in which implied terms conflict with express terms, before discussing procedural issues in breach of contract cases.

Chapter

Cover Selwyn's Law of Employment

22. The Law Relating to Trade Unions  

This chapter focuses on the law as it affects the running of a trade union. All the relevant law is consolidated by the Trade Union and Labour Relations (Consolidation) Act 1992, as amended. The discussions cover the definition of a trade union, their listing, and certification; the rules of a trade union including disciplinary action and conduct of union affairs; the executive committee, election of candidates to the executive committee; rules for accounts, records, etc; the requirements before a trade union can have a political fund and pursue political objects; breach of union rules; amalgamation and transfers; and employers’ associations.

Chapter

Cover Employment Law

18. Equal pay  

This chapter discusses the evolution of equal pay law in the UK, selection of comparator by the claimant, employer defences and remedies, bringing a claim, bringing equal pay cases using sex discrimination statutes, and critiques of equal pay law. The Equal Pay Act, which came into operation in 1975, was repealed in 2010, but its content was effectively transposed into the Equality Act 2010. A claimant is required to name a comparator of the opposite sex who she claims is paid more than she is, without good reason, despite doing the same work, broadly similar work, work which has been rated as equivalent or work of equal value. Equal pay law has been criticised for failing to bring about equality in pay between men and women. Suggested reforms include placing a positive duty on employers to take action to eliminate unequal pay. The chapter also considers gender pay gap reporting.

Chapter

Cover Employment Law Concentrate

2. Contracts of employment  

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. This chapter discusses employment contracts. Covenants potentially in restraint of trade are express written terms which may apply during the contract, but are usually expressed to apply after termination. They are a rare illustration of contractual terms, which must be in writing. The general purpose of these is to prevent a former employee competing against his former employers; for example, by taking commercially confidential information or influencing customers to give their business to the firm he has joined. The Supreme Court has recently ruled on the width of the doctrine of severance of such covenants. Topics covered include the provision of the written statement, a right which employees have enjoyed since 1963, but which was extended to workers in 2020; the sources of terms in employment contracts; duties of the employer; and duties of the employee. These duties or implied terms are divided into terms implied in law (ie inserted into every contract of employment) and terms implied in fact (ie inserted into a particular contract of employment). The latter are divided into terms implied in fact which work against the employers’ interests and terms which work against the employees’ interests. Examples of the former include the duty to pay wages; examples of the latter include the duty to obey reasonable orders.