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Chapter

Cover Employment Law

30. Employment tribunal procedure  

This chapter looks at the employment tribunal procedure and at the steps that are generally taken before a full hearing takes place, including settlements and early conciliation. Also considered are time limits. Employment tribunals are less formal than other courts. The tribunal panel is usually made up of a judge and two lay members, but a judge can sit alone in certain circumstances. A case has to be brought on a standard ET1 form, and a response on a standard ET3 form. Full details have to be given, and permission is rarely given to amend. Preliminary hearings can be held to sort out issues such as disclosure. There is also an emphasis on settlement if possible.

Chapter

Cover Smith & Wood's Employment Law

1. Introduction  

This book focuses on employment law, which has been the subject of as rapid a transformation as can have happened to any legal subject in recent times, and is certainly one of the most difficult areas of law in which to keep up to date. In some ways employment law is a curious mixture of ancient and modern, for much old law lies behind or at the basis of new statutory law and in some cases the old law continues to exist alongside the new. The subject is, however, unrecognizable from what it was only 40 years ago, with the enormous increase in statute law and the ever-increasing volume of case law on the modern statutes. Thus, the intending student must be able to exercise the lawyer’s skill in dealing with both extensive case law and major statutes, sometimes of astounding complexity. As well as setting out the history of this area of law, this chapter covers important background features of procedure and the enforcement of the law through tribunals, including significant developments such as ACAS early conciliation, the fiasco over tribunal fees, and possible future reforms to the system of adjudication.

Chapter

Cover Smith & Wood's Employment Law

1. Introduction  

Ian Smith, Owen Warnock, and Gemma Mitchell

This book focuses on employment law, which has been the subject of as rapid a transformation as can have happened to any legal subject in recent times, and is certainly one of the most difficult areas of law in which to keep up to date. In some ways employment law is a curious mixture of ancient and modern, for much old law lies behind or at the basis of new statutory law and in some cases the old law continues to exist alongside the new. The subject is, however, unrecognizable from what it was only 40 years ago, with the enormous increase in statute law and the ever-increasing volume of case law on the modern statutes. Thus, the intending student must be able to exercise the lawyer’s skill in dealing with both extensive case law and major statutes, sometimes of astounding complexity. As well as setting out the history of this area of law, this chapter covers important background features of procedure and the enforcement of the law through tribunals, including significant developments such as ACAS early conciliation, the fiasco over tribunal fees, and possible future reforms to the system of adjudication.