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Chapter

Cover A Practical Approach to Effective Litigation

3. Dispute Management, Project Management, and Risk Management  

This chapter first considers the project management approach to resolving civil disputes. Such an approach involves following a single overall plan from the first consideration of the legal dispute up to trial. However, the fact that most cases will not in fact reach trial, and that reasonable use of alternative dispute resolution must now be made at all stages, means that any plan must be sufficiently flexible to include review, and that review needs to include options as to process. The chapter then turns to the process of case evaluation, where lawyers value what a case is worth, assess the chances of winning a case, and conduct a cost-benefit analysis. Also discussed are the importance of proportionality in the conduct of litigation and managing and reducing the risk of losing a case.

Chapter

Cover A Practical Approach to Effective Litigation

4. ADR, Settlement, and Part 36 Offers  

In recent years alternative dispute resolution (ADR) has evolved from being a fallback in relation to litigation into an important alternative that may be the preferred option in some cases. This chapter outlines the interface between litigation and ADR, and puts litigation into the context of settlement options. ADR is only a complete alternative to litigation where a full adjudicative option such as arbitration or expert determination is used. In most disputes it is more likely that a case will move between litigation and ADR processes, or be subject to both at the same time where an offer has been made and remains open, but the litigation process continues. The chapter discusses the main types of ADR and their fit with litigation; framing an attempt to settle; drawing up terms of settlement; and making Part 36 offers, especially when costs are a major concern in litigation.

Chapter

Cover A Practical Approach to Alternative Dispute Resolution

1. Introduction  

This introductory chapter provides a background on alternative dispute resolution (ADR), which refers to the full range of alternatives to litigation that might be available to a lawyer and client for resolving a civil dispute. In 1998, ADR was formally acknowledged by the Civil Procedure Rules (CPR) as being potentially relevant to all civil actions. Indeed, there is strong government support for the use of ADR in providing cost-effective options for civil dispute resolution. Over the last few decades there has been fast and increasing growth in the use and variety of forms of ADR. ADR options offer many potential advantages in terms of saving time and costs, providing confidentiality, and increasing client control. However, ADR also has some potential disadvantages, especially if it is not used appropriately, and some of the strategic opportunities available in litigation may be lost.

Chapter

Cover A Practical Approach to Effective Litigation

6. Financing Litigation  

This chapter focuses on funding options for litigation. Expense is one of the biggest issues relating to litigation. The high cost of litigation has perhaps been tolerated to some extent out of respect for the expertise of lawyers and because of problems in finding a consensus on how litigation is best funded. The detailed work of the Jackson Review of Civil Litigation Costs has provided a strong basis for development, and there have been numerous expressions of judicial concern with regard to the high level of costs. The chapter begins by considering the sources of legal expense, the parties that bear the expense, and the problems that arise with regard to the expense of litigations. It then discusses funding options for litigation, including self-funding, insurance, conditional fee agreements, damage-based agreements, third party funding, and public funding. It also presents options for funding alternative dispute resolution (ADR).