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Chapter

Cover Textbook on Land Law

12. Remedies for breach of leasehold covenants  

Course-focused and comprehensive, the Textbook on Textbook on Land Law provides an accessible overview of one key area on the law curriculum. This chapter discusses the remedies available to one party to a lease when the other is in breach of duty. It first deals with general contractual remedies which are available in respect of breach of covenant. It then goes on to consider in more detail some special remedies which are peculiar to leases, and in particular the landlord’s power to forfeit the lease, i.e., to bring it to an end and to evict the tenant. It illustrates the law by reference to the tenants and subtenants of 7 Trant Way, introduced in Chapter 11.

Chapter

Cover Textbook on Land Law

12. Remedies for breach of leasehold covenants  

Course-focused and comprehensive, the Textbook on Textbook on Land Law provides an accessible overview of one key area on the law curriculum. This chapter discusses the remedies available to one party to a lease when the other is in breach of duty. It first deals with general contractual remedies which are available in respect of breach of covenant. It then goes on to consider in more detail some special remedies which are peculiar to leases, and in particular the landlord’s power to forfeit the lease, i.e., to bring it to an end and to evict the tenant.

Chapter

Cover Complete Land Law

14. Termination of Leases  

Titles in the Complete series combine extracts from a wide range of primary materials with clear explanatory text to provide readers with a complete introductory resource. This chapter discusses the ways in which leases may terminate (natural expiry, giving of notice, merger, surrender, frustration, repudiatory breach by the landlord accepted by the tenant, and forfeiture); forfeiture of leases; modes of forfeiture; forfeiture of a dwelling house; waiver of forfeiture; relief from forfeiture for breaches for non-payment of rent; relief from forfeiture for a breach of covenant other than rent; forfeiture by court proceedings under s146 LPA 1925; remediable or irremediable breaches; relief to subtenants; and the Leasehold Property (Repairs) Act 1938.

Chapter

Cover Land Law

17. Co-ownership and Priorities: The Defences Question  

All books in this flagship series contain carefully selected substantial extracts from key cases, legislation, and academic debate, providing able students with a stand-alone resource. This chapter deals with the priority rules applicable where co-owned land is sold or mortgaged. It concentrates on overreaching. It is theorized that s 27(1) of the Law of Property Act 1925 (LPA 1925) provides the basis of overreaching. Other theories include that the basis of overreaching lies in the doctrine of conversion and the trustees’ powers of disposition. The chapter considers the preconditions for overreaching to take place and the practical division that arises between trusts with one and two (or more) trustees. The chapter explores the contentious question of the effect on overreaching where a transaction constitutes an intra vires or ultra vires breach of trust and the protection available to purchasers in those circumstances where a breach of trust precludes overreaching.

Chapter

Cover Land Law

10. Freehold Covenants  

This chapter examines the proprietary effect of covenants relating to freehold land as agreements that can be enforced against subsequent owners of the servient land by subsequent owners of the dominant land. It first considers the terminology and structure used to create freehold covenants relating to land before discussing the enforceability of the burden of freehold covenants to define who can sue for breach of covenant. It then looks at indirect enforcement of positive obligations and explains how freehold covenants relate to the acquisition and defences questions. It also analyses the entitlement to the benefit of freehold covenants to define who can sue for breach of covenant, the common remedies for breach of a freehold covenant, and the statutory jurisdiction to alter outdated covenants. Finally, it evaluates a number of proposals to reform the law governing land covenants.