1-9 of 9 Results  for:

  • Keyword: breach x
  • Intellectual Property x
Clear all

Chapter

Cover Intellectual Property Law

45. Obligation of Confidence  

L. Bently, B. Sherman, D. Gangjee, and P. Johnson

This chapter considers one requirement in a breach of confidence action: that the defendant was under a legal (as opposed merely to a moral) obligation of confidentiality. It first looks at the basic test for a confidence arising that is ‘knowledge’ or ‘notice’. More specifically, the chapter examines the duties that arise in different situations, such as where the parties are in a direct relationship, where there is an indirect relationship, and where no relationship exists.

Chapter

Cover Intellectual Property Law

46. Breach and Defences  

L. Bently, B. Sherman, D. Gangjee, and P. Johnson

This chapter examines the defences available where a duty of confidence has been breached. It begins by considering the scope of the obligation that must be ascertained to determine whether the duty of confidence has been breached. It then discusses three factors for a breach of confidence to occur: derivation, the defendant’s state of mind, and whether the breach has caused damage. The chapter also tackles secondary liability for breach of confidence before concluding with an examination of the implementation of the Trade Secrets Directive.

Chapter

Cover Intellectual Property Law

44. Is the Information Capable of Being Protected?  

L. Bently, B. Sherman, D. Gangjee, and P. Johnson

This chapter looks at the type of information that is capable of being protected by the action for breach of confidence. More specifically, it examines four limitations that are placed on the type of information that may be protected under the action: where the information is trivial, immoral, vague, or in the public domain. The chapter also considers the notion of ‘relative secrecy’ along with issues associated with encrypted information and the so-called `springboard’ doctrine.

Chapter

Cover Contemporary Intellectual Property

17. Breach of confidence  

This chapter discusses contemporary law and policy relating to the protection of confidential information. It considers the key elements of breach of confidence: the nature of confidential information, circumstances imparting obligations of confidence, and unauthorised use of confidential information. The chapter also considers the increasing impact of the Human Rights Act 1998 (HRA 1998). The chapter summarises some key cases to give examples of the issues that arise (eg in the employment context), discusses the evolving relationship between secrecy and innovation, and the impact of other forms of information control. The impact of Trade Secrets Directive, including post-Brexit, is also discussed.

Chapter

Cover Holyoak and Torremans Intellectual Property Law

29. Confidentiality and trade secrets  

This chapter discusses law on confidentiality and trade secrets. It covers the historical development of the law of breach of confidence; the three essential elements necessary in a claim for breach of confidence; remedies for breach of confidence; and the impact of the internationalization of the law of intellectual property.

Chapter

Cover Intellectual Property Law

19. Breach of confidence: Trade secrets and private information  

This chapter studies breach of confidence. In the United Kingdom, the area of breach of confidence has traditionally been used to protect ideas and information, including trade secrets. The doctrine of breach of confidence is judge-made law, rooted in equitable principles. In consequence, it has developed in a piecemeal, and sometimes contradictory fashion, so that the rationale for the action has not always been clear. Nevertheless, the law of confidence is broad enough in the United Kingdom to encompass: the common definition of a trade secret (commercial, usually technical information); personal, private information which may also have a commercial value (including information which may be protected under the right to privacy under Art. 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR)); and information protected by the state. The chapter then looks at the role of trade secrets in intellectual property law and considers the EU Trade Secrets Directive.

Chapter

Cover Contemporary Intellectual Property

17. Breach of confidence  

This chapter discusses contemporary law and policy relating to the protection of confidential information, under the common law. It considers the key elements of breach of confidence: the nature of confidential information, circumstances imparting obligations of confidence, and unauthorised use of confidential information. The chapter also considers the increasing impact of the Human Rights Act 1998 (HRA 1998) and the relevance of international perspectives and approaches. The chapter summarises some key cases to give examples of the issues that arise, discusses the evolving relationship between secrecy and innovation, and the impact of other forms of information control and the relevance of freedom of expression.

Chapter

Cover Intellectual Property Concentrate

6. Trade secrets, confidential information, and the protection of private information  

This chapter focuses on the law of breach of confidence, which protects trade secrets and privacy. It is judge-made law, with its origins in equity. The action for breach of confidence now resembles a common law cause of action, but its equitable basis is still evident in the flexibility and discretion the judges adopt in deciding cases. The Human Rights Act 1998 required the courts to implement the right to private and family life. The courts have done this, in cases concerning private information, by extending the law to protect privacy where the information concerned was not secret. This is now regarded as a separate branch of the law. Special considerations also apply in relation to the duties employees owe to their employer both during and after their employment. There is a defence to an action for breach of confidence where publication is in the public interest.

Chapter

Cover Intellectual Property Law

9. Breach of Confidence  

All books in this flagship series contain carefully selected substantial extracts from key cases, legislation, and academic debate, providing able students with a stand-alone resource. This chapter focuses on the action for breach of confidence as it relates to commercial secrets. It first considers the jurisdictional basis of the action for breach of confidence and then discusses the elements for establishing a breach of confidence. The first element is that there must be confidential information; the second element is that the defendant comes under an obligation of confidence; the third element of a breach of confidence requires an unauthorized use of the information to the detriment of the person communicating it. The chapter also reviews the main confidentiality obligations that apply to employees and ex-employees with regards to commercial secrets. Finally, the chapter considers UK implementation of the Trade Secrets Directive and its relationship to breach of confidence.