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Chapter

Cover The Modern Law of Evidence

10. Visual and voice identification  

This chapter considers the risk of mistaken identification, and the law and procedure relating to evidence of visual and voice identification. In respect of evidence of visual identification, the chapter addresses: the Turnbull guidelines, including when a judge should stop a case and the direction to be given to the jury; visual recognition, including recognition by the jury themselves from a film, photograph, or other image; evidence of analysis of films, photographs, or other images; pre-trial procedure, including procedure relating to recognition by a witness from viewing films, photographs, either formally or informally; and admissibility where there have been breaches of pre-trial procedure. In respect of evidence of voice identification, the chapter addresses: pre-trial procedure; voice comparison by the jury with the assistance of experts or lay listeners; and the warning to be given to the jury (essentially an adaption of the Turnbull warning, but with particular focus on the factors which might affect the reliability of voice identification).

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Tort Law

Fearn v Board of Trustees of the Tate Gallery [2023] UKSC 4  

Essential Cases: Tort Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Fearn v Board of Trustees of the Tate Gallery [2023] UKSC 4. The document also included supporting commentary from author Craig Purshouse.

Chapter

Cover Criminology Skills

10. Presentations  

This chapter, which focuses on oral presentations, discusses the stages of preparation for a presentation, from selecting a topic to making decisions about the use of supplementary materials. It gives practical advice on organizing a presentation which flows naturally and is comprehensive and engaging. It considers issues relating to the actual delivery of the presentation including timing, combating nerves, and engaging the interest of the audience. It also covers how to deal with questions confidently, together with the importance of practise and self-reflection.

Chapter

Cover Legal Skills

18. Presentation skills  

This chapter draws upon some of the material covered in previous sections of the book that focused upon helping students locate and understand the law to prepare and deliver an effective oral presentation. It starts by outlining some guidelines on preparing a presentation, including selecting an appropriate topic and making decisions about the use of supplementary materials such as handouts or PowerPoint slides. It then considers issues relating to the delivery of the presentation, including matters such as timing, combating nerves, and engaging the interest of the audience.

Chapter

Cover Legal Skills

18. Presentation skills  

This chapter draws upon some of the material covered in previous sections of the book that focused upon helping students locate and understand the law in order to prepare and deliver an effective oral presentation. It starts by outlining some guidelines on preparing a presentation, including selecting an appropriate topic and making decisions about the use of supplementary materials such as handouts or PowerPoint slides. It then considers issues relating to the delivery of the presentation, including matters such as timing, combating nerves, and engaging the interest of the audience.

Chapter

Cover Evidence

6. Identification Evidence  

Chapter 6 first considers the three categories of factors which may contribute to the mistaken identification of the defendant as the perpetrator of the offence: witness factors, event factors, and post-event factors. It then turns to R v Turnbull in 1976, where the Court of Appeal laid down the famous ‘Turnbull guidelines’ on judicial warnings to the jury about visual identification evidence. This is followed by discussions of discretionary exclusion of identification evidence and the use of photographs and video recordings.

Chapter

Cover Legal Systems & Skills

10. Persuasive oral communication and presentations  

Scott Slorach, Judith Embley, Peter Goodchild, and Catherine Shephard

This chapter provides an understanding of why students and professional lawyers need good oral communication skills. It explains the difference between verbal skills and non-verbal skills such as eye contact and body language. It then shows students how to develop these skills to have their voice heard. Guidance is provided about how to deliver an effective presentation during legal studies, whether in class, for an assessment, or otherwise, such as in a law clinic. It then proceeds to consider how to develop these skills for practice, and provides guidance as to why, when, and how a lawyer must employ persuasive oral communication with clients. The particular issues arising from online communication, such as on Teams and Zoom calls, are explored.

Chapter

Cover Legal Systems & Skills

10. Persuasive oral communication and presentations  

Scott Slorach, Judith Embley, Peter Goodchild, and Catherine Shephard

This chapter first explains the fundamental oral communication skills law students need, including non-verbal communication such as eye contact and body language. It then shows students how to use these skills to deliver an effective presentation during legal studies, whether in class, for an assessment, or otherwise, such as in a law clinic. It then goes on to develop these skills for practice, and provides guidance as to why, when, and how a lawyer must employ persuasive oral communication with clients.