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Chapter

This chapter explores the possibility of a theory of tradition. It argues that that such as theory should not be thought of as a present, or perhaps even future, construction, but rather as a present device, or method, for thinking multiple traditions. It is a method for expanding knowledge and understanding, involving movement from within one tradition to within another, using all of the teaching of both (or all) of the traditions to facilitate this process. The discussions then turn to how traditions differ in their appreciation of time; tradition as information; the process of massaging a tradition; and tradition and corruption.

Chapter

This chapter focuses on the contribution of spare-time activities to one's skills portfolio. It encourages students to dissect everything that they do outside of their study time to determine how skills-rich their hobbies, interests, and leisure pursuits are and to explain how these activities can be used to demonstrate the skills valued by prospective employers. The first part of the chapter is structured around the employability skills identified in Chapter 1; the second part goes into more detail of popular skills-rich activities.

Chapter

An interim application is any application made to the court that requires a judicial decision. This is usually in the time between a case being issued and the final trial or determination of the action. This chapter considers the nature of interim applications. It discusses the interim applications made with and without notice, and those made with and without a hearing. It also explains common procedure and time estimates.

Chapter

An interim application is any application made to the court that requires a judicial decision. This is usually in the time between a case being issued and the final trial or determination of the action. This chapter considers the nature of interim applications. It discusses the interim applications made with and without notice, and those made with and without a hearing. It also explains common procedure and time estimates.

Chapter

This chapter discusses study skills for criminology students. It includes practical advice on different approaches to note-taking and organizing notes, time-management and planning, working with others, and getting the most out of seminars and lectures. It also includes an introduction to personal development planning (PDP) as a means of reflecting, planning, and taking action in respect of personal, educational, and career development.

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Many criminology students will be required to produce a dissertation or research report in their final year. This chapter distinguishes between these two pieces of work and offers practical advice on the requirements of each. It addresses skills such as selecting a workable research question and developing an effective relationship with supervisors, and also provides guidance on how to organize workload and create a suitable structure for a dissertation or report.

Chapter

The Concentrate Questions and Answers series offers the best preparation for tackling exam questions. Each book includes typical questions, diagram answer plans, suggested answers, author commentary, and advice on study skills. This introductory chapter provides an overview of the nature and complexities of the criminal law and the common features of all crimes such as actus reus, mens rea, and the defences. It outlines some techniques for achieving success in criminal law examinations. The chapter notes that to achieve success it is important to exercise good study skills from the outset and learn how to manage your time well. Relevance and structure are vital. Planning answers carefully, and providing critical analysis of the issues raised are essential.

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This chapter presents guidelines on how to study law effectively and approach assignments and examinations. The discussions cover the efficient management and organization of study time and how to best take advantage of lectures, tutorials, and seminars. It explains the importance of developing the technical skills of good note-taking for formal teaching sessions and for private reading. It highlights the importance of summarizing and referencing text. The chapter explains how and where case reports and statutes can be located, both electronically and on paper. Advice is given on how to approach essay and problem-based assignment questions. The chapter concludes with a discussion on preparation for exams.

Chapter

The Q&A series offer the best preparation for tackling exam questions. Each book includes typical questions, bullet-pointed answer plans and suggested answers, author commentary and illustrative diagrams and flowcharts. This chapter presents sample exam questions about statutory rights regulating the employment relationship. Through a mixture of problem questions and essays, students are guided through some of the key issues on the topic of statutory rights including protections regarding working time such as the right to annual leave and rest breaks, whistle-blowing, and rights regarding lay-offs. Students are also introduced to the current key debates in the area and provided with suggestions for additional reading for those who want to take things further.

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This chapter considers the rights that an employee may have against an employer, which are derived from, or influenced by, statute. These include the itemised pay statement; deductions from pay; time off work; patents; lay-off and short-time working; the minimum wage; restrictions on working time; rights under the Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998; grievance procedures; protection from harassment; and protection from blacklisting due to trade union membership or activities.

Chapter

The Q&A series offer the best preparation for tackling exam questions. Each book includes typical questions, bullet-pointed answer plans and suggested answers, author commentary, and illustrative diagrams and flowcharts. This chapter presents sample exam questions about statutory rights regulating the employment relationship. Through a mixture of problem questions and essays, students are guided through some of the key issues on the topic of statutory rights including protections regarding working time such as the right to annual leave and rest breaks, whistle-blowing, and rights regarding lay-offs. Students are also introduced to the current key debates in the area and provided with suggestions for additional reading for those who want to take things further.

Chapter

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. This chapter focuses on the Working Time Regulations 1998 (WTR). The WTR implement the Working Time Directive 1993 and parts of the Young Workers Directive 1994. The WTR impose a maximum 48-hour week during a 17-week reference period and provide rules on night work, rest periods, and annual leave. The UK has opted out of the maximum 48-hour working week. It is the sole EU Member State to do so. On Brexit, the WTR are one of the areas which may come under attack from neo-liberals.

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This chapter considers miscellaneous legal rights given to employees in the Employment Rights Act 1996 and other legislation. These are minimum standards which can be exceeded by agreement or negotiation, but they cannot be denied to an employee. The discussions cover guarantee payments (ERA, ss 28–35); suspension on medical grounds (ERA, ss 64–65) and time off work for various reasons, such as for public duties, study, or training, and for occupational pension scheme trustees. It also covers statutory sick pay; and the scheme surrounding the Working Time Regulations 1998, employment law, and looks at the provisions of the regulations and their enforcement.

Chapter

This chapter considers miscellaneous legal rights given to employees in the Employment Rights Act 1996 and other legislation. These are minimum standards which can be exceeded by agreement or negotiation, but they cannot be denied to an employee. The discussions cover guarantee payments (ERA, ss 28–35); suspension on medical grounds (ERA, ss 64–65) and time off work for various reasons, such as for public duties, study, or training, and for occupational pension scheme trustees. It also covers statutory sick pay including self-isolation due to Coronavirus; the scheme surrounding the Working Time Regulations 1998, and looks at the provisions of the regulations and their enforcement.

Chapter

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. This chapter focuses on the Working Time Regulations 1998 (WTR). The WTR implement the Working Time Directive 1993 and parts of the Young Workers Directive 1994. The WTR impose a maximum 48-hour week during a 17-week reference period and provide rules on night work, rest periods, and annual leave. The UK has opted out of the maximum 48-hour working week. It was the sole European Union Member State to do so. On Brexit, the WTR are one of the areas which may come under attack from neoliberals.

Chapter

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. This chapter discusses the law on parental rights. Topics covered include maternity leave, parental leave, time off for dependants, and right to request flexible working. The right to shared parental leave (SPL) is singled out for detailed treatment, partly because it is fairly new, and partly because, some would say, it exemplifies an old-fashioned approach to sex equality when caring for newborns. The option as to whether her partner can share in SPL is for the mother to decide; the mother may receive (by contract) enhanced maternity pay, but there is no enhanced SPL. The effect is to reinforce the mother’s staying at home because if she goes back to work, the family will lose most of the partner’s income because the rate of pay for SPL is low, around £145 a week. The latter point is arguably sex discrimination, and during the currency of this book the Employment Appeal Tribunal will decide this issue (at the time of writing employment tribunals are split).

Chapter

This chapter focuses on the skills needed to study law. It begins by describing how a law degree is structured and what sorts of activities students are likely to take part in as part of that degree. It then discusses lectures, seminars and tutorials, note-taking, working with others, time management, learning from feedback, and personal development planning.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the law covering atypical workers. These include part-time workers, fixed-term workers, agency workers and ex-offenders. The EU social policy was tasked with coming up with a number of directives to prevent discrimination against such workers, and to give them what is effectively a ‘floor of rights’. Under the law, part-time workers should not be treated less favourably than full-timers, unless this can be objectively justified. Fixed-term workers should not be treated less favourably than full-timers, unless this can be objectively justified. A fixed-term employee who has been with the same employer for four years is entitled to a permanent contract. An agency worker is entitled to comparable terms and conditions as a permanent employee after twelve weeks. Ex-offenders are entitled not to refer to their convictions in certain circumstances, depending on what they were sentenced to.

Chapter

This chapter looks at the employment tribunal procedure and at the steps that are generally taken before a full hearing takes place, including settlements and early conciliation. Also considered are time limits. Employment tribunals are less formal than other courts. The tribunal panel is usually made up of a judge and two lay members, but a judge can sit alone in certain circumstances. A case has to be brought on a standard ET1 form, and a response on a standard ET3 form. Full details have to be given, and permission is rarely given to amend. Preliminary hearings can be held to sort out issues such as disclosure. There is also an emphasis on settlement if possible.

Chapter

This chapter looks at the background to the Working Time Regulations, the core working time rights and the specifics of the law. It then considers some of the arguments that have been raised both for and against such regulation. The Working Time Regulations regulate daily rest, weekly working time, weekly rest and annual leave, among other matters. The maximum weekly working time is forty-eight hours, but the UK has retained an opt-out to this, so a person can agree to work more hours. The opt-out remains extremely controversial amongst fellow European Member States. The chapter also considers remedies if the rights are breached.