1-20 of 32 Results

  • Keyword: time x
Clear all

Chapter

Cover Legal Traditions of the World

1. A Theory of Tradition? The Changing Presence of the Past  

This chapter explores the possibility of a theory of tradition. It argues that that such as theory should not be thought of as a present, or perhaps even future, construction, but rather as a present device, or method, for thinking multiple traditions. It is a method for expanding knowledge and understanding, involving movement from within one tradition to within another, using all of the teaching of both (or all) of the traditions to facilitate this process. The discussions then turn to how traditions differ in their appreciation of time; tradition as information; the process of massaging a tradition; and tradition and corruption.

Chapter

Cover Concentrate Q&A Criminal Law

1. Exam Skills for Success in Criminal Law  

The Concentrate Questions and Answers series offers the best preparation for tackling exam questions. Each book includes typical questions, diagram answer plans, suggested answers, author commentary, and advice on study skills. This introductory chapter provides an overview of the nature and complexities of the criminal law and the common features of all crimes such as actus reus, mens rea, and the defences. It outlines some techniques for achieving success in criminal law examinations. The chapter notes that to achieve success it is important to exercise good study skills from the outset and learn how to manage your time well. Relevance and structure are vital. Planning answers carefully, and providing critical analysis of the issues raised are essential.

Chapter

Cover Introduction to Business Law

20. Study Skills  

This chapter presents guidelines on how to study law effectively and approach assignments and examinations. The discussions cover the efficient management and organization of study time and how to best take advantage of lectures, tutorials, and seminars. It explains the importance of developing the technical skills of good note-taking for formal teaching sessions and for private reading. It highlights the importance of summarizing and referencing text. The chapter explains how and where case reports and statutes can be located, both electronically and on paper. Advice is given on how to approach essay and problem-based assignment questions. The chapter concludes with a discussion on preparation for exams.

Chapter

Cover Criminology Skills

16. Dissertations and research reports  

Many criminology students will be required to produce a dissertation or research report in their final year. This chapter distinguishes between these two pieces of work and offers practical advice on the requirements of each. It addresses skills such as selecting a workable research question and developing an effective relationship with supervisors, and also provides guidance on how to organize workload and create a suitable structure for a dissertation or report.

Chapter

Cover Criminology Skills

6. Study skills  

This chapter discusses study skills for criminology students. It includes practical advice on different approaches to note-taking and organizing notes, time-management and planning, working with others, and getting the most out of seminars and lectures. It also includes an introduction to personal development planning (PDP) as a means of reflecting, planning, and taking action in respect of personal, educational, and career development.

Chapter

Cover Concentrate Questions and Answers Employment Law

11. Statutory rights regulating the employment relationship  

The Q&A series offer the best preparation for tackling exam questions. Each book includes typical questions, bullet-pointed answer plans and suggested answers, author commentary, and illustrative diagrams and flowcharts. This chapter presents sample exam questions about statutory rights regulating the employment relationship. Through a mixture of problem questions and essays, students are guided through some of the key issues on the topic of statutory rights including protections regarding working time such as the right to annual leave and rest breaks, whistle-blowing, and rights regarding lay-offs. Students are also introduced to the current key debates in the area and provided with suggestions for additional reading for those who want to take things further.

Chapter

Cover Selwyn's Law of Employment

7. Employment Protection  

This chapter considers miscellaneous legal rights given to employees in the Employment Rights Act 1996 and other legislation. These are minimum standards which can be exceeded by agreement or negotiation, but they cannot be denied to an employee. The discussions cover guarantee payments (ERA, ss 28–35); suspension on medical grounds (ERA, ss 64–65) and time off work for various reasons, such as for public duties, study, or training, and for occupational pension scheme trustees. It also covers statutory sick pay including self-isolation due to Coronavirus; the scheme surrounding the Working Time Regulations 1998, and looks at the provisions of the regulations and their enforcement.

Chapter

Cover Employment Law Concentrate

7. Working time  

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. This chapter focuses on the Working Time Regulations 1998 (WTR). The WTR implement the Working Time Directive 1993 and parts of the Young Workers Directive 1994. The WTR impose a maximum 48-hour week during a 17-week reference period and provide rules on night work, rest periods, and annual leave. The UK has opted out of the maximum 48-hour working week. It was the sole European Union Member State to do so. On Brexit, the WTR are one of the areas which may come under attack from neoliberals.

Chapter

Cover Smith & Wood's Employment Law

5. The work–life balance legislation  

This chapter addresses a number of legislative regimes creating rights that affect the balance between work and life outside of work. Specifically, the discussion focuses on the controls over working hours and rest breaks and the right to paid annual leave in the Working Time Regulations; the law on maternity, adoption, paternity, shared parental and other parental leave; and the right to request flexible working arrangements. Although not all of these rights can claim work–life balance as their original policy driver, they have come to be seen as representing a loosely coherent programme for ensuring that the process of earning a living does not preclude any worker from enjoying other aspects of life, especially family life. The chapter considers, singly, each of these work–life rights, and the policies and legislation behind them and assesses whether the law delivers effective and useful rights. Gender inequality forms a central theme of the chapter, noting that many work–life balance problems flow from unequal gender norms in the home.

Chapter

Cover Smith & Wood's Employment Law

9. Collective labour law  

This chapter considers the laws that affect trade unions and employment relations at a collective level, with the exception of strikes and other industrial action, which are examined in Chapter 10. The chapter begins by considering the legal status of a trade union and the statutory concept of trade union independence. The applicability of trade union law to workers in the gig economy is also considered. The focus then shifts to the ways in which the law seeks to secure freedom of association, by provisions which protect and support union membership and activities including giving protection against discrimination and providing rights to time off for union duties and activities. The chapter then turns to the concept of recognition of unions for collective bargaining, and the legal rights that come with recognition. It also examines the statutory system for securing recognition. The relevance of the European Convention on Human Rights is considered throughout, as are the changes made by the Trade Union Act 2016. The law relating to domestic and European works councils is also considered.

Chapter

Cover Smith & Wood's Employment Law

5. The work–life balance legislation  

Ian Smith, Owen Warnock, and Gemma Mitchell

This chapter addresses a number of legislative regimes creating rights that affect the balance between work and life outside of work. Specifically, the discussion focuses on the controls over working hours and rest breaks and the right to paid annual leave in the Working Time Regulations; the law on maternity, adoption, paternity, shared parental, and other parental leave; and the right to request flexible working arrangements. Although not all of these rights can claim work–life balance as their original policy driver, they have come to be seen as representing a loosely coherent programme for ensuring that the process of earning a living does not preclude any worker from enjoying other aspects of life, especially family life. The chapter considers, singly, each of these work–life rights and the policies and legislation behind them, and assesses whether the law delivers effective and useful rights. Gender inequality forms a central theme of the chapter, noting that many work–life balance problems flow from unequal gender norms in the home.

Chapter

Cover Smith & Wood's Employment Law

9. Collective labour law  

Ian Smith, Owen Warnock, and Gemma Mitchell

This chapter considers the laws that affect trade unions and employment relations at a collective level, with the exception of strikes and other industrial action, which are examined in Chapter 10. The chapter begins by considering the legal status of a trade union and the statutory concept of trade union independence. The applicability of trade union law to workers in the gig economy is also considered. The focus then shifts to the ways in which the law seeks to secure freedom of association, by provisions which protect and support union membership and activities including giving protection against discrimination and providing rights to time off for union duties and activities. The chapter then turns to the concept of recognition of unions for collective bargaining, and the legal rights that come with recognition. It also examines the statutory system for securing recognition. The relevance of the European Convention on Human Rights is considered throughout, as are the changes made by the Trade Union Act 2016. The law relating to domestic and European works councils is also considered.

Chapter

Cover Legal Skills

10. Study skills  

This chapter focuses on the skills needed to study law. It begins by describing how a law degree is structured and what sorts of activities students are likely to take part in as part of that degree. It then discusses lectures, seminars, and tutorials; note-taking; working with others; time management; learning from feedback; and personal development planning.

Chapter

Cover Steiner and Woods EU Law

8. Remedies in National Courts  

This chapter, which examines the issues concerning the responsibility for procedural rules and remedies between European Union (EU) and national law, discusses the relevant jurisprudence of the Court of Justice (CJ) and explains how it has developed the principles of equivalence and effectiveness, notably in specific fields such as sex discrimination law. It addresses the question of the extent to which EU law, while respecting the principle of national procedural autonomy, may nevertheless require the creation of new remedies in national legal systems for EU law rights—for instance as regards damages, time limits or interim relief.

Chapter

Cover Legal Systems & Skills

15. Revision and assessment  

Scott Slorach, Judith Embley, Peter Goodchild, and Catherine Shephard

This Chapter provides guidance on revision and assessment. It provides guidance on how to plan for effective revision, including time management techniques and memory aids. Engagement, and motivation, and how they link to success, is covered. Guidance is given about wellbeing and mental and physical health, including disability support. Suggestions are provided about how to respond to feedback and practice resilience. The role and importance of assessment criteria is highlighted. Information is provided about different types of assessment, including traditional assessment methods such as exams, courseworks and dissertations, together with more contemporary methods of assessment such as online exams, MCQs and SBAQs, projects, presentations and reflective portfolios. Other relevant contemporary issues, such as the rise in cheating and grade inflation, are discussed. Guidance is provided about good exam technique, including timing, observing word limits, clarity of communication, focus and stamina.

Chapter

Cover Legal Skills

10. Study skills  

This chapter focuses on the skills needed to study law. It begins by describing how a law degree is structured and what sorts of activities students are likely to take part in as part of that degree. It then discusses lectures, seminars, and tutorials; note-taking; working with others; time management; learning from feedback; and personal development planning.

Chapter

Cover Concentrate Questions and Answers Company Law

1. Exam Skills for Success in Company Law  

The Concentrate Questions and Answers series offers the best preparation for tackling exam questions and coursework. Each book includes typical questions, suggested answers with commentary, illustrative diagrams, guidance on how to develop your answer, suggestions for further reading, and advice on exams and coursework. This chapter provides advice on exams and exam questions in company law to ensure you are best prepared for your assessment, including guidance on how to approach essay and problem questions. It provides lots of important tips for exam success, covering both your preparation for the exam, and your approach to the exam itself. The well-known approaches of IRAC (Issue, Rule, Apply, Conclude) to problem questions and PEA (Point, Explain, Analysis) to essay writing are reviewed.

Chapter

Cover Employment Law in Context

13. Part-Time and Fixed-Term Work  

This chapter examines the policies that have been adopted to strike a balance between the twin objectives of labour market flexibility and enhanced job quality in the context of the regulation of part-time work and fixed-term work. It discusses the benefits and drawbacks of part-time and fixed-term working: for workers the flexibility which accompanies such positions can enable them to secure working hours that are tailored around their domestic and social responsibilities; however, such work often comes at a cost in terms of low pay, low status, and insecurity. These working patterns are attractive to employers as they generate cost efficiencies. The chapter evaluates the equal treatment regimes contained in the Part-Time Workers Regulations and the Fixed-Term Employees Regulations. In so doing, it addresses the Framework Agreement and Directive on Part-time Work and the Agreement on Fixed-term Work and the Fixed-term Work Directive.

Chapter

Cover Employment Law Concentrate

6. Parental rights  

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. This chapter discusses the law on parental rights. Topics covered include maternity leave, parental leave, time off for dependants, the right to request flexible working, and the new right of parents to bereavement leave. The right to shared parental leave (SPL) is singled out for detailed treatment, partly because it is fairly new, and partly because, some would say, it exemplifies an old-fashioned approach to sex equality when caring for newborns. The option as to whether her partner can share in SPL is for the mother to decide; the mother may receive (by contract) enhanced maternity pay, but there is no enhanced SPL. The effect is to reinforce the mother’s staying at home because if she goes back to work, the family will lose most of the partner’s income because the rate of pay for SPL is low, around £151 a week. The latter point is arguably sex discrimination, and, during the currency of this book, the Employment Appeal Tribunal will decide this issue (at the time of writing employment tribunals are split).

Chapter

Cover Steiner & Woods EU Law

8. Remedies in national courts  

This chapter, which examines the issues concerning the responsibility for procedural rules and remedies between European Union (EU) and national law, discusses the relevant jurisprudence of the Court of Justice (CJ) and explains how it has developed the principles of equivalence and effectiveness, notably in specific fields such as sex discrimination law. It addresses the question of the extent to which EU law, while respecting the principle of national procedural autonomy, may nevertheless require the creation of new remedies in national legal systems for EU law rights—for instance as regards damages, time limits or interim relief.