1-20 of 67 Results

  • Keyword: statute x
Clear all

Chapter

Cover Street on Torts

19. Breach of statutory duty  

This chapter examines how statutory obligations occasionally give rise to private actions in tort. It explains that a breach of a statutory duty will not automatically confer a right of action on anyone adversely affected by it (and that it does not necessarily ground an action for negligence either). The chapter sets out the relevant elements of the statute-based tort, noting that the claimant must prove both that he was intended by Parliament to be protected as an individual and that the protection was aimed at preventing the kind of loss he suffered. If these elements are fulfilled, he will be entitled to compensation for loss. Defences specific to this area of law are considered also.

Chapter

Cover Cheshire, Fifoot, and Furmston's Law of Contract

7. Unenforceable Contracts  

M P Furmston

This chapter and the next five chapters deal with cases where what looks like a contract turns out to be in someway defective. The ‘unenforceable contract’ resulted from procedural rather than substantive law. The origin of this position can be found in the passage, as long ago as 1677, of the Statute of Frauds. This chapter, which examines the history of this statute and its surviving effects in the modern law, discusses the Law of Property (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1989; other rules about form; and the law on writing, signature, and electronic commerce.

Chapter

Cover Constitutional and Administrative Law

12. The royal prerogative  

This chapter begins by discussing the origins and meaning of the term ‘royal prerogative’. It identifies some examples of prerogative powers and considers how certain personal or reserve powers of the monarch might be exercised in practice. The chapter also explores the relationship between prerogative power and statutes and focuses on how the courts have dealt with the prerogative. The chapter also discusses the adaptation of prerogative powers, the relationship between the prerogative and the courts, and the courts’ recent willingness to review the exercise of certain prerogative powers. The chapter concludes by looking at several ways in which the prerogative could be reformed.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Public Law

R (on the application of HS2 Action Alliance Ltd) v Secretary of State for Transport [2014] UKSC 3, Supreme Court (also known as R (on the application of Buckinghamshire CC))  

Essential Cases: Public Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case note summarizes the facts and decision in R (on the application of HS2 Action Alliance Ltd) v Secretary of State for Transport [2014] UKSC 3, Supreme Court (also known as R (on the application of Buckinghamshire CC)). This case note is concerned primarily with the distinction between ordinary and constitutional statutes, and what happens where two constitutional statutes are in conflict. The document also includes supporting commentary and questions from author Thomas Webb.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Public Law

British Railways Board v Pickin [1974] AC 765, House of Lords  

Essential Cases: Public Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in British Railways Board v Pickin [1974] AC 765, House of Lords. The case concerned the unwillingness of the courts to look behind the process by which statutes were enacted by Parliament. The case note explores the wider implications of this position in the context of debate between orthodox and alternative conceptions of parliamentary sovereignty, and the notion of constitutional statutes. The document also includes supporting commentary and questions from author Thomas Webb.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Public Law

R (on the application of HS2 Action Alliance Ltd) v Secretary of State for Transport [2014] UKSC 3, Supreme Court (also known as R (on the application of Buckinghamshire CC))  

Essential Cases: Public Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case note summarizes the facts and decision in R (on the application of HS2 Action Alliance Ltd) v Secretary of State for Transport [2014] UKSC 3, Supreme Court (also known as R (on the application of Buckinghamshire CC)). This case note is concerned primarily with the distinction between ordinary and constitutional statutes, and what happens where two constitutional statutes are in conflict. The document also includes supporting commentary and questions from author Thomas Webb.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Public Law

British Railways Board v Pickin [1974] AC 765, House of Lords  

Essential Cases: Public Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in British Railways Board v Pickin [1974] AC 765, House of Lords. The case concerned the unwillingness of the courts to look behind the process by which statutes were enacted by Parliament. The case note explores the wider implications of this position in the context of debate between orthodox and alternative conceptions of parliamentary sovereignty, and the notion of constitutional statutes. The document also includes supporting commentary and questions from author Thomas Webb.

Chapter

Cover Learning Legal Rules

7. Making Sense of Statutes  

This chapter focuses on a topic rarely covered in academic texts: why statutes have a particular form and how to read and apply that statutory language (the next chapter deals with specific points of interpretation of statutes). The chapter discusses the techniques and problems of analysing the structure of statutes. It describes how statutes are set out, what particular catch phrases mean, and how to make sense of the opaque language often used. It covers drafting styles and practices; the problems of drafting statutes in English law, comprehensibility, and awareness of how the courts are likely to interpret them; examples of drafting practices and how to approach them; techniques for amending earlier statutes, either wholesale or in section and other key points on drafting.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Public Law

Thoburn v Sunderland City Council [2002] EWHC 195 (Admin), Divisional Court  

Essential Cases: Public Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Thoburn v Sunderland City Council [2002] EWHC 195 (Admin), Divisional Court. This case introduced the concept of a ‘constitutional’ statute into UK jurisprudence. The case note reflects on the consequences of this. The document also includes supporting commentary and questions from author Thomas Webb.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Public Law

Imperial Tobacco Ltd v The Lord Advocate (Scotland) [2012] UKSC 61, Supreme Court  

Essential Cases: Public Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Imperial Tobacco Ltd v The Lord Advocate (Scotland) [2012] UKSC 61, Supreme Court. This case concerned the devolved legislative competence of the Scottish Parliament, the powers reserved to the Westminster Parliament under the Scotland Act 1998, and how these provisions should be interpreted. The statutory interpretation of constitutional legislation is also considered. The document also includes supporting commentary and questions from author Thomas Webb.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Public Law

Thoburn v Sunderland City Council [2002] EWHC 195 (Admin), Divisional Court  

Essential Cases: Public Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Thoburn v Sunderland City Council [2002] EWHC 195 (Admin), Divisional Court. This case introduced the concept of a ‘constitutional’ statute into UK jurisprudence. The case note reflects on the consequences of this. The document also includes supporting commentary and questions from author Thomas Webb.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Public Law

Imperial Tobacco Ltd v The Lord Advocate (Scotland) [2012] UKSC 61, Supreme Court  

Essential Cases: Public Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Imperial Tobacco Ltd v The Lord Advocate (Scotland) [2012] UKSC 61, Supreme Court. This case concerned the devolved legislative competence of the Scottish Parliament, the powers reserved to the Westminster Parliament under the Scotland Act 1998, and how these provisions should be interpreted. The statutory interpretation of constitutional legislation is also considered. The document also includes supporting commentary and questions from author Thomas Webb.

Chapter

Cover Equity and Trusts Concentrate

10. Variation of trusts  

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. This chapter focuses on the circumstances in which the courts may approve the variation of a trust. A trust may be varied: by a power within the trust itself; by the collective consent of the beneficiaries; by the court, through its inherent jurisdiction; or by statute. The power of the courts to intervene will depend on whether the variation relates to administrative or managerial matters or a reorganization of the beneficial interests. The Variation of Trusts Act 1958 gives the courts a wide jurisdiction to vary a trust for the benefit of those beneficiaries unable to consent.

Chapter

Cover Public Law Concentrate

4. The separation of powers  

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. This chapter discusses the meaning of separation of powers; what judges say about the separation of powers in the UK; what statutes say about the separation of powers in the UK; whether the UK Government is based on the separation of powers; the relationship between the executive and the legislature, the relationship between the executive and the legislature in the process of departure from the European Union, the whip system and backbench revolts, the relationship between the executive and the judiciary, the independence of the judiciary, the appointment and dismissal of judges, the Civil Procedure Rule Committee, the Sentencing Council for England and Wales, and the relationship between the courts and Parliament. UK law

Chapter

Cover The Modern Law of Evidence

11. Evidence obtained by illegal or unfair means  

This chapter discusses the circumstances in which relevant evidence can be excluded, as a matter of law or discretion, on the grounds that it was obtained illegally, improperly, or unfairly. The principles for exclusion of evidence are considered, and exclusion in both civil and criminal cases are covered. In respect of civil cases, discretionary exclusion under the civil procedure rules is examined, and in respect of criminal cases, discretionary exclusion at common law and under statute is discussed. The chapter also considers the circumstances in which criminal proceedings should be stayed as an abuse of the court’s process, where a trial would undermine public confidence in the criminal justice system and bring it into disrepute.

Chapter

Cover English Legal System Concentrate

3. Sources of Law I: Domestic Legislation  

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. This chapter examines domestic legislation. Domestic legislation is created by Parliament, which consists of the House of Commons, the House of Lords, and the Monarch. It is divided into primary legislation and secondary legislation. Primary legislation takes the form of ‘Acts of Parliament’, commonly referred to as ‘statutes’. Statutes can cover a vast variety of laws including criminal law, land law, contract law, and many others. Meanwhile, secondary legislation—also known as delegated legislation or subordinate legislation—is the most common instrument for implementing change within the UK. Parliament has neither the time, the resources, nor the expertise to deal with certain matters. It is for these reasons that the majority of legislation is made outside of Parliament. Accordingly, Parliament may delegate such powers, through an Act of Parliament to other bodies and institutions to implement. Such bodies often include the Privy Council, government ministers, local authorities, and other regulatory agencies.

Chapter

Cover An Introduction to Tort Law

1. Introduction  

Celebrated for their conceptual clarity, titles in the Clarendon Law Series offer concise, accessible overviews of major fields of law and legal thought. This introductory chapter provides an overview of tort law. It discusses the development of the law of tort in England; how the increase in tort liability is matched by a decline in the potency of contract; the differences between statutes and judge-made law; when conduct is tortious; the forum for a claim in tort; the three focal points of torts: conduct, harm, and causation; where torts happen; and the need to restrict the number of persons who can complain of any particular conduct.

Chapter

Cover Legal Skills

3. Finding legislation  

This chapter explains how to find domestic legislation, that is, statutes, statutory instruments, and European legislation both online and in a law library. The chapter also explains how to determine whether there is any statute law on a particular topic and how to work out whether a piece of legislation is in force. The chapter closes by explaining how to find the official current text of the European Convention on Human Rights.

Chapter

Cover Legal Skills

3. Finding legislation  

This chapter explains how to find domestic legislation, that is, statutes, statutory instruments, and EU legislation both online and in a law library. The chapter also explains how to determine whether there is any statute law on a particular topic and how to work out whether a piece of legislation is in force. The chapter closes by explaining how to find the official current text of the European Convention on Human Rights.

Chapter

Cover Cassese's International Criminal Law

17. Legal impediments to the exercise of criminal jurisdiction  

Antonio Cassese, Paola Gaeta, Laurel Baig, Mary Fan, Christopher Gosnell, and Alex Whiting

This chapter discusses the obstacles that may hamper or jeopardize criminal proceedings for international crimes. These include rules granting amnesty for broad categories of crimes; statutes of limitation; the prohibition of double jeopardy (the principle of ne bis idem), whereby a person may not be brought to trial twice for the same offence; and international rules on personal immunities.