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Chapter

A party may sometimes take the view that the statement of case provided by the other side is not as clear as it should be, or fails to set out the other side’s case with the precision that would be expected. In such cases a request may be made for further information about the facts on which the other side’s case is based. This chapter discusses the rules on requests for further information; the response; objecting to requests; orders for responses; requests in freezing injunctions; and collateral use.

Chapter

A party may sometimes take the view that the statement of case provided by the other side is not as clear as it should be, or fails to set out the other side’s case with the precision that would be expected. In such cases a request may be made for further information about the facts on which the other side’s case is based. This chapter discusses the rules on requests for further information; the response; objecting to requests; orders for responses; requests in freezing injunctions; and collateral use.

Chapter

A statement of case is a summary of allegations of fact which sets out all the elements required by law to show a cause of action, and entitlement to all remedies claimed. Clear, concise, and complete statements of case are central to effective litigation. A good statement of case encapsulates what the case is about, demonstrating good factual analysis, based on a proper understanding of the relevant law. This chapter deals with the rules and skill related to statements of case, and how statements of case can be refined. The discussions cover the process for drafting a statement of case; rules for drafting; principles for focusing on issues; headings for statements of case; framework for particulars of a claim; specifying remedies and relief; refining a statement of case; and challenging a statement of case.

Chapter

A party may sometimes take the view that the statement of case provided by the other side is not as clear as it should be, or fails to set out the other side’s case with the precision that would be expected. In such cases a request may be made for further information about the facts on which the other side’s case is based. This chapter discusses the rules on requests for further information; the response; objecting to requests; orders for responses; requests in freezing injunctions; and collateral use.

Chapter

This chapter discusses striking-out orders, discontinuance, and stays in civil proceedings. Rule 3.4(2) of the Civil Procedure Rules 1998 (CPR) allows the court to strike out a statement of case if it appears to the court: that the statement of case discloses no reasonable grounds for bringing or defending the claim; that the statement of case is an abuse of the court’s process or is otherwise likely to obstruct the just disposal of the proceedings; or that there has been a failure to comply with a rule, practice direction, or court order. A party who realizes their case is doomed is often best advised to discontinue to prevent the accumulation of further costs, but often has to pay the costs of the other parties to date. Stays are temporary halts in proceedings, and can be granted for a range of reasons. A stay is normally lifted once the reason no longer applies.

Chapter

This chapter discusses striking-out orders, discontinuance, and stays in civil proceedings. Rule 3.4(2) of the Civil Procedure Rules 1998 (CPR) allows the court to strike out a statement of case if it appears to the court: that the statement of case discloses no reasonable grounds for bringing or defending the claim; that the statement of case is an abuse of the court’s process or is otherwise likely to obstruct the just disposal of the proceedings; or that there has been a failure to comply with a rule, practice direction, or court order. A party who realizes their case is doomed is often best advised to discontinue to prevent the accumulation of further costs, but often has to pay the costs of the other parties to date. Stays are temporary halts in proceedings, and can be granted for a range of reasons. A stay is normally lifted once the reason no longer applies.

Chapter

This chapter discusses striking-out orders, discontinuance, and stays in civil proceedings. Rule 3.4(2) of the Civil Procedure Rules 1998 (CPR) allows the court to strike out a statement of case if it appears to the court: that the statement of case discloses no reasonable grounds for bringing or defending the claim; that the statement of case is an abuse of the court’s process or is otherwise likely to obstruct the just disposal of the proceedings; or that there has been a failure to comply with a rule, practice direction, or court order. A party who realizes their case is doomed is often best advised to discontinue to prevent the accumulation of further costs, but often has to pay the costs of the other parties to date. Stays are temporary halts in proceedings, and can be granted for a range of reasons. A stay is normally lifted once the reason no longer applies.

Chapter

11. The rule against hearsay II  

Common law and statutory exceptions

This chapter discusses the statutory exceptions to the inadmissibility of hearsay evidence in criminal cases that were created by the Criminal Justice Act 2003. The impact of the Human Rights Act 1998 on the admissibility of hearsay evidence is discussed, including the important cases of Horncastle and Al-Khawaja and Tahery v United Kingdom, where the Supreme Court and the European Court of Human Rights came into conflict over whether an accused may be convicted where the ‘sole and decisive’ evidence against him is hearsay. The common law exceptions preserved by the Criminal Justice Act 2003 are then considered—res gestae. The chapter ends with discussion of the abolition of hearsay in civil proceedings by the Civil Evidence Act 1995.

Chapter

Legal representatives will draft many statements of case in order to produce accurate, relevant, and compelling formal court documents. This chapter provides key formulae to help those new to practice produce competent statements of case. It explains the purpose of a statement of case and the standard requirements of a statement of case. It also discusses the particulars of claim; the defence; additional claims; the reply; the Part 18 request for further information; and amendments to statements of case.

Chapter

Changes in the parties’ knowledge of a case as it progresses and straightforward drafting errors make it necessary on occasion to make amendments to the statements of case. This chapter discusses amendment by consent; amendment without permission; principles governing permission to amend; amendment after the expiry of the limitation period; and procedure on amending.

Chapter

Legal representatives will draft many statements of case in order to produce ac-cur-ate, relevant, and compelling formal court documents. This chapter provides key formulae to help those new to practice produce competent statements of case. It explains the purpose of a statement of case and the standard requirements of a statement of case. It also discusses the particulars of claim; the defence; additional claims; the reply; the Part 18 request for further information; and amendments to statements of case.

Chapter

Changes in the parties’ knowledge of a case as it progresses and straightforward drafting errors make it necessary on occasion to make amendments to the statements of case. This chapter discusses amendment by consent; amendment without permission; principles governing permission to amend; amendment after the expiry of the limitation period; and procedure on amending.

Chapter

Changes in the parties’ knowledge of a case as it progresses and straightforward drafting errors make it necessary on occasion to make amendments to the statements of case. This chapter discusses amendment by consent; amendment without permission; principles governing permission to amend; amendment after the expiry of the limitation period; and procedure on amending.