1-3 of 3 Results

  • Keyword: social responsibility x
Clear all

Chapter

Cover Markesinis & Deakin's Tort Law

4. Liability for Fault: Breach  

This chapter examines the principal element of the cause of action in negligence, namely breach of duty. The issue of breach of duty is concerned with whether the defendant was careless, in the sense of failing to conform to the standard of care applicable to him. The discussions cover the concept of breach of duty; the objective standard; professional and regulatory standards; updating of standards in the light of new information; the role of cost-benefit analysis and the ‘Learned Hand’ test; weighing the risk and gravity of harm against the cost of prevention; and proof of carelessness, including discussion of the res ipsa loquitur principle.

Chapter

Cover Information Technology Law

5. Cyber-speech  

This chapter examines cyber-speech and its implications for free expression. It first provides an overview of the technologies involved, from simple systems such as web pages, blogs, and internet fora to social media platforms (SMPs), and media-sharing sites. The chapter then highlights the social implications of the shift in power from centralized media organizations to users. It also considers the responsibilities that users owe to each other in this environment and how regulators may balance freedom of expression with social responsibility. To determine whose values predominate when regulating a global media tool which does not recognize traditional borders, the chapter presents two case studies: political speech and hate speech.

Chapter

Cover Information Technology Law

5. Cyber-speech  

This chapter examines cyber-speech and its implications for free expression. It first provides an overview of the technologies involved, from simple systems such as web pages and internet forums to social media platforms (SMPs) such as blogs, social media platforms, and media-sharing sites. The chapter then highlights the social implications of the shift in power from centralized media organizations to decentralized ‘citizen journalism’. It also considers the responsibilities that citizens owe to each other in this environment and how regulators may balance freedom of expression with social responsibility. To determine whose values predominate when regulating a global media tool which does not recognize traditional borders, the chapter presents three particular case studies: political speech, hate speech, and commercial speech.