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Chapter

This chapter discusses the general skills for employment that the student will develop while studying law. It will also focus on some of the more specific ‘legal’ skills they will acquire. General skills are true transferable skills. This means that they are applicable in most, if not all, spheres of employment. These include collaboration/teamwork, problem solving, researching (hardcopy and digital) and referencing, decision making, time management, project management; and oral, written and digital communication. Subject-specific skills are the employability skills that are relevant to specific types of employment or academic subjects. These include advocacy, negotiation skills, client interviewing, letter writing, and legal research.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the meaning and types of employability skills. It explains why these are so important and why these must be developed by students throughout their time at university. The chapter describes the performance of a skills audit, i.e. thinking about the skills that one already has and spotting any gaps which might need to be addressed.

Book

Emily Finch and Stefan Fafinski

Legal Skills is structured in three parts, covering a full range of legal skills. The first part deals with sources of law and includes information on finding and using legislation, case law, books, journals, and official publications, making sure you understand where the law comes from, and how to use it. The second part covers academic legal skills and provides advice on study and writing skills, legal reasoning, referencing and avoiding plagiarism, essay writing, dissertations, problem solving, and revision and examinations. The final part of the book covers the practical legal skills of oral presentation, mooting, and negotiation. This sixth edition includes a new section on legal ethics and codes of professional conduct, and completely rewritten chapters on presentation skills, and negotiation skills, including a brand new scenario, together with a large number of other enhancements throughout.

Book

Emily Finch and Stefan Fafinski

Legal Skills is structured in three parts, covering a full range of legal skills. The first part deals with sources of law and includes information on finding and using legislation, case law, books, journals, and official publications, making sure you understand where the law comes from, and how to use it. The second part covers academic legal skills and provides advice on study and writing skills, legal reasoning, referencing and avoiding plagiarism, essay writing, dissertations, problem solving, and revision and examinations. The final part of the book covers the practical legal skills of oral presentation, mooting, and negotiation.

Chapter

This chapter focuses on the contribution of spare-time activities to one's skills portfolio. It encourages students to dissect everything that they do outside of their study time to determine how skills-rich their hobbies, interests, and leisure pursuits are and to explain how these activities can be used to demonstrate the skills valued by prospective employers. The first part of the chapter is structured around the employability skills identified in Chapter 1; the second part goes into more detail of popular skills-rich activities.

Chapter

This introductory chapter attempts to answer the question ‘what is criminology?’ by exploring the origin of criminology as a discipline together with an overview of some of the types of question that may be of interest to criminologists. It sets out the structure of the remainder of the book, the first part of which introduces the source material that is commonly used in the study of criminology. The second part focuses on academic skills, while the final part concentrates on research methods.

Chapter

This Guide is concerned with the lawyers’ skills that underpin practice as a solicitor and which are introduced during the Legal Practice Course (LPC). It serves as a supplement rather than a substitute for skills training undertaken on the LPC. This introductory chapter briefly discusses the nature of legal skills training and then provides instructions on how to use the present Guide.

Chapter

Scott Slorach, Judith Embley, Peter Goodchild, and Catherine Shephard

This chapter covers the graduate careers employability process, looking at CVs, application forms, and interviews. Considering law firms and other graduate employers, it suggests ways of ensuring that applications and CVs best show a candidate’s knowledge, skills, and commercial awareness. It also provides guidance on approaching interviews and related selection activities, such as presentations, group work, and psychometric tests.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the skills needed for effective legal writing. It focuses on the ‘Plan, Write, Revise’ approach to effective writing; strategies for developing the ability to write plain English; how to vary language and style to suit the needs of readers; and being self-critical and continuing to develop writing skills.

Chapter

The Q&A series offer the best preparation for tackling exam questions. Each book includes typical questions, bullet-pointed answer plans and suggested answers, author commentary and illustrative diagrams and flowcharts. This chapter gives students advice on skills for success in employment law exams. It includes tips on how to get the most out of the employment law course and how best to use the revision period. Students are also provided with helpful hints on what to do in the exam room to ensure that they have the best chance of success, as well as advice on the structure and approach to problem questions and essays.

Chapter

This final chapter looks forward to a successful future beyond law school. It starts by considering what may, but need not, be the last contact with the institution, and then thinks about ways in which the student can use the legal skills and personal attributes that they have developed during their studies in the future. It ends by briefly revisiting the notion of success, to see what that might mean as the student moves on to a successful future. It argues that whether or not the student achieves ‘success’ depends on how it is defined. Whether plans are ambitious or modest, couched in absolute terms, or in terms of effort, it is highly unlikely that future plans will all run smoothly. Perhaps the most valuable skill of the successful law student is resilience. They will need to be able to process disappointment or unexpected developments, and move on.

Chapter

Scott Slorach, Judith Embley, Peter Goodchild, and Catherine Shephard

This chapter focuses on the additional skills needed to embark on a career in practising law. It discusses personal characteristics; team-working; delegation; meetings; client care; networking; marketing; IT skills; and the use of social media. It also considers the meaning of commercial awareness and how this might be explored at interviews.

Book

Emily Finch and Stefan Fafinski

Employability Skills for Law Students is designed to help you: identify the academic, practical and transferable skills that can be developed whilst studying for a law degree; recognise the value of those skills to employers (within both law and non-law professions); identify any gaps in your skills portfolio; maximise opportunities to develop new skills through participation in a range of activities; effectively demonstrate your skills to potential employers; and improve your employability prospects on graduation from university. It is the only book specifically designed to support law students in developing the employability skills required to pursue their chosen career on graduation. A strong emphasis is placed upon ‘learning by doing’, with each chapter including practical activities designed to give students the opportunity to practise skills and encourage thought and reflection on personal development. Whether you are in your first year or your last, this book will ensure you make the most of your time at university, developing skills inside and outside the lecture theatre so that you are in the best possible position to pursue your chosen career on graduation—as a solicitor, barrister, or a completely different profession. An interactive Online Resource Centre provides a range of practical activities designed to give you opportunities to practise and receive feedback upon the skills you are developing.

Book

Smith, Hogan, and Ormerod’s Essentials of Criminal Law presents a clear and authoritative discussion of the criminal law, combining authority with supportive learning features. The book engages with all the key topics of criminal law on the typical LLB syllabus, whilst encouraging the development of analytical and assessment skills. Particular attention is paid to student assessment, with end-of-chapter sections offering advice on how to approach essay and problem questions. Short learning and assessment tips are provided throughout the chapters. Key cases are highlighted across chapters which include brief summaries of the main facts and judgment. Each chapter includes a section on reform, introducing important academic criticism of the law.

Chapter

This introductory chapter explains the philosophy of the book and its pedagogical features. It assists in broadening research skills and knowledge. Further, it introduces the Civil Procedure Rules. Finally, it highlights professional conduct considerations and how they are dealt with in this book.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the skills needed for drafting legal documents. It covers preparing to draft; responsibility for drafting; getting down to drafting; the appearance, style, and content of the draft; the use of grammar and language; the process of amendment; engrossment and completion; construction of documents; applying the ‘plan, write, revise’ approach; and persuasive and informative drafting.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the skills needed for practical problem-solving. It focuses on understanding the importance of a problem-solving strategy for effective practice; using a variety of problem-solving techniques; and developing an effective risk-management strategy for one’s own work.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the skills of interviewing and advising clients. It covers the purpose of interviews; the importance of non-verbal communication; preparing for initial client interviews; the WASP approach; listening and questioning techniques; providing appropriate advice and information; and establishing a professional relationship with the client.

Chapter

This chapter discusses legal negotiating skills. It covers the characteristics of effective negotiators; negotiating styles and strategies; common negotiating mistakes; and negotiation and alternative dispute resolution.

Book

The Concentrate Questions and Answers series offers the best preparation for tackling exam questions. Each book includes typical questions, diagram answer plans, suggested answers, author commentary, and advice on study skills. This includes pitfalls to avoid in the caution sections; and tips for gaining extra marks in questions. Further reading is provided at the end of chapters. Concentrate Questions & Answers Criminal Law offers advice on what to expect in exams and how best to prepare. The book begins by looking at exam and study techniques and then moves on to consider the elements of a crime (including actus reus and mens rea), murder and manslaughter, non-fatal offences, and sexual offences. It then looks at a range of property offences, before exploring the defences in depth. The book concludes with a consideration of secondary participation and inchoate offences, a chapter on mixed questions, and a chapter on how to tackle coursework assessments.