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Chapter

Lee Roach

This chapter examines the rationale behind the rescue culture and the two principal rescue mechanisms: administration and the company voluntary arrangement. The UK has sought to adopt a rescue culture, under which the law offers struggling companies access to several rescue mechanisms. The principal rescue mechanism is administration, under which an administrator is appointed to try and fulfil the purpose of administration. An administrator can be appointed by the court; the holder of a qualifying floating charge; or the company or its directors. A moratorium is imposed once a company enters administration, which prevents certain actions from proceedings. Meanwhile, a company voluntary arrangement is a rescue procedure that allows a company to enter into a binding agreement with its creditors. A company voluntary arrangement begins with a proposal being made, and that proposal must then be approved by the company and creditors.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Tort Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Frost (or White) v Chief Constable of South Yorkshire Police [1999] 2 AC 455. The document also included supporting commentary from author Craig Purshouse.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Tort Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Frost (or White) v Chief Constable of South Yorkshire Police [1999] 2 AC 455. The document also included supporting commentary from author Craig Purshouse.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Tort Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Frost (or White) v Chief Constable of South Yorkshire Police [1999] 2 AC 455. The document also included supporting commentary from author Craig Purshouse.

Chapter

This chapter examines the rationale behind the rescue culture and the three principal rescue mechanisms: administration, the company voluntary arrangement, and the moratorium. The UK has sought to adopt a rescue culture, under which the law offers struggling companies access to several rescue mechanisms. The principal rescue mechanism is administration, under which an administrator is appointed to try and fulfil the purpose of administration. An administrator can be appointed by the court, the holder of a qualifying floating charge, or the company or its directors. A moratorium is imposed once a company enters administration, which prevents certain actions from proceeding. Meanwhile, a company voluntary arrangement is a rescue procedure that allows a company to enter into a binding agreement with its creditors. A company voluntary arrangement begins with a proposal being made, and that proposal must then be approved by the company and creditors. A new, free-standing moratorium was introduced in 2020.

Chapter

This chapter examines the different procedures available to companies that are experiencing financial difficulties. The chapter begins by examining what is a rescue culture, and the extent to which such a culture is present in the UK. The chapter then discusses a series of mechanisms that are designed to rescue a struggling company, namely administration and company voluntary arrangements. Receivership is then discussed, which is not a rescue procedure, but a mechanism designed to allow a creditor to recover monies owed. The chapter then looks at winding up (or liquidation) which is the process whereby the assets of the company are realized and paid out, prior to the company being dissolved. The chapter ends by looking at the rules relating to dissolution and restoration.

Chapter

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. This chapter discusses the various procedures available to companies experiencing financial difficulties that are so severe that the company’s survival is in jeopardy. It focuses on procedures that aim to help struggling companies (such as administration); help creditors recover monies owed (such as receivership); and commence the process of ending the company’s existence and provide for the distribution of its remaining assets (namely winding up).

Book

Brenda Hannigan

Company Law brings clarity and analysis to the ever-changing landscape of this field. The text aims to capture the dynamism of the subject, places the material in context, highlights its relevance and topicality, and guides readers through all the major areas. The book is divided into five distinct sections covering corporate structure (including legal personality and constitutional issues), corporate governance (including directors' duties and liabilities), shareholders' rights and remedies (including powers of decision-making and shareholder engagement), corporate finance (including share and loan capital), and corporate insolvency (including insolvencies arising).

Book

Dr Lee Roach

Company Law provides an introduction to this topic. The text guides the reader through the intricacies of the subject with expert analysis of the application of principles to real-life cases. The chapters provide comprehensive coverage of all core aspects of company law. The relationship between company law and corporate governance is explored, ensuring that readers have a full picture of how and why companies are created and regulated. Topics include: the formation and nature of the company; the board of directors; membership of the company; and corporate rescue, restructuring, and insolvency.

Book

Lee Roach

Company Law guides the reader through the intricacies of the subject with expert analysis of the application of principles to real-life cases. The chapters provide comprehensive coverage of all core aspects of company law. The relationship between company law and corporate governance is explored, ensuring that readers have a full picture of how and why companies are create d and regulated. Topics include: the formation and nature of the company; the board of directors; membership of the company; and corporate rescue, restructuring, and insolvency; and new subjects such as the effects of the UK’s withdrawal from the European Union and the impact upon company law of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Chapter

The Concentrate Questions and Answers series offers the best preparation for tackling exam questions and coursework. Each book includes typical questions, suggested answers with commentary, illustrative diagrams, guidance on how to develop your answer, suggestions for further reading, and advice on exams and coursework. This chapter examines the law on corporate insolvency. It considers the important and topical subject of corporate rescue, reviewing, in particular, administration and company voluntary arrangements. The chapter addresses several issues relating to liquidation, including: winding up petitions and the meaning of ‘inability to pay debts’; assets available to creditors; distribution of assets to creditors; priority of claims; the pari passu principle; and transaction avoidance (dispositions of property after the commencement of winding up, transactions at an undervalue, preferences, voidable floating charges, and transactions defrauding creditors). The potential liability of directors on a company’s insolvent liquidation is considered, concentrating on wrongful and fraudulent trading and disqualification.

Chapter

Titles in the Core Text series take the reader straight to the heart of the subject, providing focused, concise, and reliable guides for students at all levels. This chapter deals with the regulatory regime governing corporate rescue and liquidations. It first considers two procedures that were introduced by the Insolvency Act 1986 aimed at implementing the objective of corporate rescue: the administration order and the company voluntary arrangement, the former of which has been fundamentally reformed by the Enterprise Act 2002. It then discusses voluntary winding-up by companies, members, and creditors under the 1986 Act, as well as the grounds on which the court may initiate compulsory winding-up. The chapter also examines the consequences of a winding-up petition on dispositions of company property; winding-up in the public interest; the duties and functions of the liquidator; provisions allowing avoidance of transactions entered into prior to liquidation; the personal liability of directors under the Insolvency Act 1986; and distribution of surplus assets following liquidation. Finally, it outlines a number of amendments to the 1986 Act.

Chapter

Titles in the Core Text series take the reader straight to the heart of the subject, providing focused, concise, and reliable guides for students at all levels. This chapter deals with the regulatory regime governing corporate rescue and liquidations. It first considers two procedures that were introduced by the Insolvency Act 1986 aimed at implementing the objective of corporate rescue: the administration order and the company voluntary arrangement, the former of which has been fundamentally reformed by the Enterprise Act 2002. It then discusses voluntary winding-up by companies, members, and creditors under the 1986 Act, as well as the grounds on which the court may initiate compulsory winding-up. The chapter also examines the consequences of a winding-up petition on dispositions of company property; winding-up in the public interest; the duties and functions of the liquidator; provisions allowing avoidance of transactions entered into prior to liquidation; the personal liability of directors under the Insolvency Act 1986; and distribution of surplus assets following liquidation. Finally, it outlines a number of amendments to the 1986 Act.