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Chapter

Cover Company Law

13. Membership  

This chapter discusses the concept of membership. Section 112 of the Companies Act 2006 (CA 2006) provides that a person is a member if they have agreed to become a member and their name is entered into the register of members. In relation to a newly created company, the subscribers to the company’s memorandum will become members, even if their names are not entered into the register of members. Accordingly, a person’s membership is terminated when their name is removed from the register of members. Every company must keep a register of its members, although private companies can elect to keep the required information on the central register maintained by Companies House. In order to help improve the transparency of company ownership, certain companies are required to keep a register of interests disclosed and a register of persons with significant control.

Chapter

Cover Company Law

1. Formation, classification, and registration of companies  

This chapter considers the mechanics of formation and registration as well as the various types of companies which may be formed. The focus is on registered companies, registered under the Companies Act 2006. The chapter considers the role of the registrar of companies and the public registry and the types of companies which can be registered. The key categories are companies limited by shares and limited by guarantee. Private and public companies limited by shares as well as corporate groups are all considered. The chapter also looks briefly at alternative vehicles for business, such as partnerships, limited partnerships and limited liability partnerships.

Chapter

Cover Company Law

3. Incorporation  

This chapter examines the various ways by which a company can be created and the different types of company that can be created. The process of creating a company is known as ‘incorporation’. There are four principal methods of incorporating a company: by royal charter, by Act of Parliament, by delegated authority, or by registration. The general rule is that the Companies Act 2006 (CA 2006) only applies to registered companies. However, in order to prevent unregistered companies being under-regulated and having an unfair advantage over registered companies, the CA 2006 provides that the Secretary of State may pass regulations that set out how the CA 2006 is applied to unregistered companies. There are a number of different company types that can suit a wide array of businesses. These include public and private companies. Companies can change their status by a process called re-registration.

Chapter

Cover Company Law

1. Introduction to company law  

Titles in the Core Text series take the reader straight to the heart of the subject, providing focused, concise, and reliable guides for students at all levels. This chapter presents an overview of company law, first by considering the company’s place within the various forms of business organisation. To get some comparative perspective on the relative merits of each type of organisation, three criteria for judging them are discussed: whether the form of business organisation facilitates investment in the business, mitigates or minimises the risk involved in the business venture, and whether it provides a clear organisational structure. Using these criteria, three forms of business organisation are analysed: the sole trader, a partnership, or a registered company. The chapter also explains the importance of the memorandum as part of the company’s constitution, as well as the distinction between private companies and public companies. Finally, it outlines the benefits of forming a company as opposed to the sole trader or a partnership.

Chapter

Cover Mayson, French & Ryan on Company Law

9. Control of a company  

This chapter discusses how control of a company can be identified and how it can change. The chapter considers takeovers, the City Code and compulsory acquisition of remaining shares. There is full discussion of the provisions for disclosure of significant holdings both to warn of potential takeover moves and to disclose in the public interest who has significant control of a company. Shares in public companies may be held by nominee owners and this may disguise the fact that one person is building up a significant holding. The statutory definitions of holding company, subsidiary and wholly owned subsidiary are considered.

Chapter

Cover Mayson, French, and Ryan on Company Law

9. Control of a company  

This chapter discusses how control of a company can be identified and how it can change. The chapter considers takeovers, the City Code and compulsory acquisition of remaining shares. There is full discussion of the provisions for disclosure of significant holdings both to warn of potential takeover moves and to disclose in the public interest who has significant control of a company. Shares in public companies may be held by nominee owners and this may disguise the fact that one person is building up a significant holding. The statutory definitions of holding company, subsidiary and wholly owned subsidiary are considered.

Chapter

Cover Partnership and LLP Law

17. Insolvency and Dissolution  

This chapter explains how insolvency law applies to an LLP. It considers the various insolvency processes under the Insolvency Act 1986 that can arise, and the position of members in a winding up, both as potential contributories and also as potential creditors. It addresses investigations into LLPs under the Companies Act 1985, and finally explains how an LLP can be struck from the register and how it can be restored.