1-5 of 5 Results

  • Keyword: quantitative restrictions x
Clear all

Chapter

Essential Cases: EU Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Procureur du Roi v Benoît and Gustave Dassonville (Case 8/74), EU:C:1974:82, [1974] ECR 837, 11 July 1974. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Noreen O’Meara.

Chapter

Essential Cases: EU Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Procureur du Roi v Benoît and Gustave Dassonville (Case 8/74), EU:C:1974:82, [1974] ECR 837, 11 July 1974. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Noreen O’Meara.

Chapter

Essential Cases: EU Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Procureur du Roi v Benoît and Gustave Dassonville (Case 8/74), EU:C:1974:82, [1974] ECR 837, 11 July 1974. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Noreen O'Meara.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the non-pecuniary obstacles to the law on the free movement of goods in the EU. It discusses the following: prohibition of quantitative restrictions and measures having equivalent effect; grounds of derogation under Article 36 TFEU; indistinctly applicable measures and mandatory requirements, Cassis de Dijon and developing the list of mandatory requirements; principles of mutual recognition and equivalence; Case C-267 and 268/91 Keck and Mithouard (1993) and certain selling arrangements; presentation requirements; the conditions in Keck and the difficulties in finding a consistent rule; the blurred distinction between Article 36 TFEU and ‘mandatory requirements’; Article 35 TFEU; and Directive 98/34 on the provision of information in the field of technical standards and regulations.

Chapter

This chapter explores the free movement of goods, which lies at the very heart of the internal market. The idea of the free movement of goods was the starting point that the EEC Treaty aimed for, and remains one of the greatest achievements of the EU to date. However, as with everything in EU law, there are a lot of legal rules underpinning a fairly straightforward concept. The Treaty contains two separate sets of provisions that address matters of taxation when it comes to trade in products. The first relates to border taxation, while the second relates to internal taxation. With regard to non-taxation issues, the primary issue is quantitative restrictions: situations where a Member State either blocks a specific volume of products from entering its market, or outlaws/bans a product altogether. The chapter then considers the exceptions to free movement of goods, and assesses how Brexit may impact on the free movement of goods between the UK and the EU.