1-16 of 16 Results

  • Keyword: property offences x
Clear all

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Criminal Law

R v Collins [1973] QB 100, Court of Appeal  

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Collins [1973] QB 100, Court of Appeal. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Criminal Law

R v Hinks [2001] 1 AC 241, House of Lords  

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Hinks [2001] 1 AC 241, House of Lords. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Criminal Law

R v Collins [1973] QB 100, Court of Appeal  

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Collins [1973] QB 100, Court of Appeal. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Criminal Law

R v Hinks [2001] 1 AC 241, House of Lords  

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Hinks [2001] 1 AC 241, House of Lords. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Book

Cover Concentrate Q&A Criminal Law
The Concentrate Questions and Answers series offers the best preparation for tackling exam questions. Each book includes typical questions, diagram answer plans, suggested answers, author commentary, and advice on study skills. This includes pitfalls to avoid in the caution sections; and tips for gaining extra marks in questions. Further reading is provided at the end of chapters. Concentrate Questions & Answers Criminal Law offers advice on what to expect in exams and how best to prepare. The book begins by looking at exam and study techniques and then moves on to consider the elements of a crime (including actus reus and mens rea), murder and manslaughter, non-fatal offences, and sexual offences. It then looks at a range of property offences, before exploring the defences in depth. The book concludes with a consideration of secondary participation and inchoate offences, a chapter on mixed questions, and a chapter on how to tackle coursework assessments.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Criminal Law

R v G and R [2003] UKHL 50, House of Lords  

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v G and R [2003] UKHL 50, House of Lords. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Criminal Law

R v G and R [2003] UKHL 50, House of Lords  

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v G and R [2003] UKHL 50, House of Lords. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Cover Smith, Hogan and Ormerod's Essentials of Criminal Law

9. Theft and other property offences  

David Ormerod and John Child

This chapter deals with offences against property, a category of offences that criminalise conduct such as the dishonest taking of another’s property (e.g. theft, robbery), possessing stolen or criminal property (e.g. handling stolen goods, money laundering), and damaging another’s property (e.g. criminal damage, arson). Beyond such crimes, there are also a number of specific technical offences designed to protect particular property rights, such as those relating to vehicle misuse and intellectual and/or digital property. The final sections of the chapter outline potential options for legal reform and the application of property offences within problem questions. Relevant cases are highlighted throughout the chapter, with brief summaries of the main facts and judgments.

Chapter

Cover Smith, Hogan, and Ormerod's Essentials of Criminal Law

9. Theft and other property offences  

This chapter deals with offences against property, a category of offences that criminalise conduct such as the dishonest taking of another’s property (eg theft, robbery), possessing stolen or criminal property (eg handling stolen goods, money laundering), and damaging another’s property (eg criminal damage, arson). Beyond such crimes, there are also a number of specific technical offences designed to protect particular property rights, such as those relating to vehicle misuse and intellectual and/or digital property. The final sections of the chapter outline potential options for legal reform and the application of property offences within problem questions. Relevant cases are highlighted throughout the chapter, with brief summaries of the main facts and judgments.

Book

Cover Criminal Law Directions
Without assuming prior legal knowledge, books in the Directions series introduce and guide readers through key points of law and legal debate. Questions, diagrams, and exercises help readers to engage fully with each subject and check their understanding as they progress. Criminal Law Directions is written with an emphasis on explaining the key topics of Criminal Law courses with clarity. The book starts by offering an introduction to criminal law. It also looks at the issues of actus reus and mens rea. It goes on to consider topics such as strict liability; murder and voluntary manslaughter; involuntary manslaughter; non-fatal offences against the person; and sexual offences. It moves on to look at theft and other offences against property, including robbery, burglary, blackmail, handling, and criminal damage. Fraud and drugs offences are then examined and general and specific defences are explored. Finally the book considers inchoate offences and accessorial liability.

Chapter

Cover Smith, Hogan, & Ormerod's Text, Cases, & Materials on Criminal Law

17. Offences of damage to property  

This chapter examines the offences of damage to property, which are governed by the Criminal Damage Act 1971. It considers the ability to define damage; the relationship between the elements of the offence, particularly D’s mens rea as to circumstance elements; and the arguments for endangerment offences.

Chapter

Cover Complete Criminal Law

10. Property offences 1: theft, robbery, burglary, and handling  

This chapter examines property offences in England and Wales, focusing on theft, burglary, robbery, and handling. The chapter outlines the general principles of these offences and discusses their actus reus and mens rea elements. It looks at the key provisions of the Theft Act 1968 including the s1 definition of theft in the Act and analyses the bases of court decisions in several examples of relevant cases. It discusses property and appropriation. It also discusses recent changes to the definition of dishonesty and how juries are now asked to assess dishonesty after the civil case of Ivey v Genting Casinos (UK) Ltd (Crockfords).

Chapter

Cover Smith, Hogan, & Ormerod's Text, Cases, & Materials on Criminal Law

12. Theft  

This chapter examines the law governing theft. It considers the extent to which the criminal law of theft conflicts with civil law concepts of property; whether it is possible to steal property that belongs to oneself; the types of property that may be stolen; and the extent to which it is possible to provide a definition of ‘dishonesty’. The test for dishonesty has been fundamentally altered by the Supreme Court and the Court of Appeal, developments which are analysed in this chapter.

Chapter

Cover Criminal Law Concentrate

11. Theft  

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. This chapter discusses the crime of theft. There are five elements in theft: appropriation; property; belonging to another; dishonesty; and intention permanently to deprive. The first three listed are the actus reus elements and the last two are the mens rea. The offence is under s 1 Theft Act 1968, but ss 2–6 give (some) guidance on each of the elements.

Chapter

Cover Smith, Hogan, and Ormerod's Criminal Law

27. Offences of damage to property  

David Ormerod and Karl Laird

The principal offences of damage to property are governed by the Criminal Damage Act 1971. Under s 1(1), a person commits an offence if he, without lawful excuse, destroys or damages any property belonging to another with the intention to destroy or damage such property or being reckless as to whether the property will be destroyed or damaged. This chapter deals with offences of damage to property and their mens rea, along with destroying or damaging property with intent to endanger life, arson, racially or religiously aggravated criminal damage, threats to destroy or damage property, possession offences, kindred offences and mode of trial and sentence for those guilty of offences of damage to property.

Chapter

Cover Complete Criminal Law

11. Property offences 2: fraud and other property offences  

This chapter examines property offences focusing on fraud, making off without payment, blackmail, and criminal damage. It explains the key provisions of the Fraud Act 2006 for different types of fraud, including fraud by false representation, fraud by failing to disclose information, fraud by abuse of position, and obtaining services dishonestly. It clarifies the difference between fraud and the previous offences of deception. The chapter then discusses burglary, aggravated burglary, criminal damage, and blackmail and identifies the types of legal defence that can be successfully employed for these offences. It also considers racially and religiously aggravated criminal damage, criminal damage endangering life, and arson.