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Chapter

This chapter reviews various procedural mechanisms to ensure that the eventual trial runs smoothly and fairly. In terms of facilitating the smooth running of the trial, it concentrates on ways of screening cases and clarifying some of the issues prior to trial. The disclosure of evidence is a fraught matter in this regard, with an impact on fairness as well as efficiency. In terms of ensuring that the defendant is not subjected to an unfair trial, it examines some question that arise under the broad heading of abuse of process, concentrating on issues of delay and the entrapment doctrine.

Chapter

Alisdair A. Gillespie and Siobhan Weare

This chapter on the criminal justice system focuses on preliminary issues, ie some of the issues that take place before trial begins. A prosecution begins at the earliest stage through a defendant being charged by the police but under the authority of the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS). The CPS must then review the decision to prosecute, which requires the CPS to have reference to two prosecution tests (evidential and public interest tests). The CPS has the ability to issue out of court disposals in appropriate cases as alternatives to prosecution. If a prosecution does take place it is necessary to identify in which court the proceedings will be heard. Crimes are divided into three categories: summary, indictable-only, and either-way. Criminal matters are heard in the magistrates’ court and the Crown Court and the categorization of offences has an impact on where the matter should be heard.

Chapter

Alisdair A. Gillespie and Siobhan Weare

This chapter on the criminal justice system focuses on preliminary issues, i.e. some of the issues that take place before trial begins. A prosecution begins at the earliest stage through a defendant being charged by the police but under the authority of the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS). The CPS must then review the decision to prosecute, which requires the CPS to have reference to two prosecution tests (evidential and public interest tests). The CPS has the ability to issue out of court disposals in appropriate cases as alternatives to prosecution. If a prosecution does take place it is necessary to identify in which court the proceedings will be heard. Crimes are divided into three categories: summary, indictable-only, and either-way. Criminal matters are heard in the magistrates’ court and the Crown Court and the categorization of offences has an impact on where the matter should be heard.

Chapter

This chapter deals with pre-trial practices and procedures of indictable-only offences. It covers sending indictable-only cases to the Crown Court under s. 51 Crime and Disorder Act 1998 (CDA 1998); preparing for the preliminary hearing in the Crown Court; preparing for trial on indictment; pre-trial disclosure issues and defence statements; instructing counsel; and pre-trial hearings including the Plea and Trial Preparation Hearing (PTPH).

Chapter

Martin Hannibal and Lisa Mountford

This chapter deals with pre-trial practices and procedures of indictable-only offences. It covers sending indictable-only cases to the Crown Court under s. 51 Crime and Disorder Act 1998 (CDA 1998); preparing for the preliminary hearing in the Crown Court; preparing for trial on indictment; pre-trial disclosure issues and defence statements; instructing counsel; and pre-trial hearings including the Plea and Trial Preparation Hearing (PTPH).