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Chapter

This chapter concerns the remedy of specific performance. The remedy of specific performance is a remedy which applies only where someone has already engaged to do something, but has then failed to do so. An equitable remedy of specific performance is a personal remedy against the defendant, as equity acts in personam, and disobedience is classified as a contempt of court which can lead to imprisonment or other action. The remedy provides an alternative to an award of damages, and it may sometimes be awarded alongside damages. The remedy of specific performance evolved to allow the courts to compel a defendant to perform a contractual obligation. At common law, if a contracting party failed to do what was promised, the injured party had a remedy only in damages.

Chapter

Jack Beatson, Andrew Burrows, and John Cartwright

This chapter discusses the rules governing contract performance. It covers the standards of contractual duty, time of performance, place of performance, order of performance, payment, vicarious performance, alternative modes of performance, right of party in breach to cure bad or incomplete performance, tender, and partial performance.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the various performance aspects of mooting. It provides answers to the following questions: Why can't points outside the grounds of appeal be argued? Can there be any discussion with colleague during the moot? How can pronunciation of English words generally be improved upon? How can the pronunciation of English (and Welsh) names be improved upon? Do the facts of the moot problem need to be outlined to the moot judge? Is it ever possible to put an interpretation on the facts in order to favour a hypothetical client? Should the law be expressly applied to the facts of the moot problem? Is not being able to act a problem? How should the submission be introduced and concluded?

Chapter

M P Furmston

This chapter discusses the law on performance and breach of contact. It covers the order of performance; excuses for non-performance; whether a party who does not perform perfectly can claim payment or performance from the other party; whether an innocent party who has paid in advance can recover his payment in the event of a failure of perfect performance; whether the innocent party can terminate the contract; the effect of a repudiation or a fundamental breach; the effect of discharging the contract for a bad reason, when a good reason also exists; contractual provisions for termination; stipulations as to time; and tender of performance.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Lumley v Wagner (1852) 42 ER 687, Court of Chancery. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Derek Whayman.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Lumley v Wagner (1852) 42 ER 687, Court of Chancery. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Derek Whayman.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Lumley v Wagner (1852) 42 ER 687, Court of Chancery. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Derek Whayman.

Chapter

The Concentrate Questions and Answers series offers the best preparation for tackling exam questions. Each book includes typical questions, answer plans and suggested answers, author commentary and other features. The standard common law remedy of damages will not always prove adequate for the victim of a breach of contract. Equity therefore developed a number of additional remedies, discretionary in nature, aimed at ensuring that a claimant was not unreasonably confined to an award of damages; in particular, specific performance and injunctions. The possibility of awarding restitutionary damages, in part to offset any unjust enrichment secured by a contract-breaker, is also considered.

Book

How to Moot provides guidance and pointers towards all aspects of successful mooting. Topics covered include the nature and attraction of mooting, producing a persuasive presentation, performance, style, and judgements. The text is suitable for use by mooters at all levels: those just starting out will find all the basics set out, and there are advanced tips for the more experienced mooter. The text is divided into short chapters which include chapter summaries and diagrams. The text also includes example moot problems and a transcript of a moot. The approach adopted here is a Q&A one, which provides detailed answers to commonly asked questions.

Chapter

10. Fundamental changes  

Frustration and common mistake

This chapter examines the doctrines of frustration and common mistake that deal with situations where fundamental changes have occurred. Frustration and common mistake apply to situations where the parties find themselves in uncharted territory. The doctrines ask courts to determine the limits of a contract, the point where the contractual framework runs out and the contract no longer holds. This chapter first considers the impact of ‘unknown unknowns’ on the contract and the distinction between frustration and common mistake before discussing frustrating events and the consequences of frustration. It also describes three types of common mistake that render the contract void: mistakes as to the existence of the subject matter, mistakes as to the possibility of performance, and certain types of mistakes as to the quality of the subject matter. Finally, it looks at the legal consequences of common mistake and remedies for common mistake.

Chapter

This chapter focuses on rights in performances, which covers all aspects of the making of a recording of a performance and its subsequent exploitation. The discussion includes subsistence of rights; term of protection; the qualification requirement; content and infringement; the nature of the performer’s rights and their transfer; and moral rights.

Chapter

This chapter discusses remedies for breach of contract. It covers damages (remoteness of damage and measure of damages; mitigation; contributory negligence; liquidated damages and penalties; and deposits, part payments, and forfeitures), specific performance (specific performance a discretionary remedy; the principle of mutuality; and the remedy of injunction), and extinction of remedies (the statutory time limits; effect of defendant’s fraud; extension of time in case of disability; effect of acknowledgement or part payment; and effect of lapse of time on equitable claims).

Chapter

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. The common law provides the remedy of damages as of right for any breach. However, damages may not always provide a suitable or adequate remedy. One of the key equitable maxims states that ‘equity will not suffer a wrong without a remedy’. Therefore, over the years the courts have developed a number of equitable remedies to address the limitations of the common law response. This chapter considers the range of equitable remedies which have been developed by the courts: specific performance; injunctions; rescission; rectification; and account.

Chapter

10. Fundamental changes  

Frustration and common mistake

This chapter examines the doctrines of frustration and common mistake that deal with situations where fundamental changes have occurred. Frustration and common mistake apply to situations where the parties find themselves in uncharted territory. The doctrines ask courts to determine the limits of a contract, the point where the contractual framework runs out and the contract no longer holds. This chapter first considers the impact of ‘unknown unknowns’ on the contract and the distinction between frustration and common mistake before discussing frustrating events and the consequences of frustration. It also describes three types of common mistake that render the contract void: mistakes as to the existence of the subject matter, mistakes as to the possibility of performance, and certain types of mistakes as to the quality of the subject matter. Finally, it looks at the legal consequences of common mistake and remedies for common mistake.

Chapter

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. The common law provides the remedy of damages as of right for any breach. However, damages may not always provide a suitable or adequate remedy. One of the key equitable maxims states that ‘equity will not suffer a wrong without a remedy’. Therefore, over the years the courts have developed a number of equitable remedies to address the limitations of the common law response. This chapter considers the range of equitable remedies which have been developed by the courts: specific performance; injunctions; rescission; rectification; and account.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Co-operative Insurance Society Ltd v Argyll Stores (Holdings) Ltd [1998] AC 1, House of Lords. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Derek Whayman.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Contract Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Hyde v Wrench [1840] EWHC Ch J90; (1840) 49 ER 132; (1840) 3 Beav 334. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Nicola Jackson.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Contract Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Davis Contractors Ltd v Fareham Urban District Council [1956] AC 696. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Nicola Jackson.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Land Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Walsh v Lonsdale (1882) 21 Ch D 9, Court of Appeal. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Aruna Nair.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Contract Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Hyde v Wrench [1840] EWHC Ch J90; (1840) 49 ER 132; (1840) 3 Beav 334. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Nicola Jackson.