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Chapter

Cover Mayson, French & Ryan on Company Law

9. Control of a company  

This chapter discusses how control of a company can be identified and how it can change. The chapter considers takeovers, the City Code and compulsory acquisition of remaining shares. There is full discussion of the provisions for disclosure of significant holdings both to warn of potential takeover moves and to disclose in the public interest who has significant control of a company. Shares in public companies may be held by nominee owners and this may disguise the fact that one person is building up a significant holding. The statutory definitions of holding company, subsidiary and wholly owned subsidiary are considered.

Chapter

Cover Mayson, French, and Ryan on Company Law

9. Control of a company  

This chapter discusses how control of a company can be identified and how it can change. The chapter considers takeovers, the City Code and compulsory acquisition of remaining shares. There is full discussion of the provisions for disclosure of significant holdings both to warn of potential takeover moves and to disclose in the public interest who has significant control of a company. Shares in public companies may be held by nominee owners and this may disguise the fact that one person is building up a significant holding. The statutory definitions of holding company, subsidiary and wholly owned subsidiary are considered.

Chapter

Cover Medical Law

12. Organ Transplantation  

This chapter discusses organ transplantation. It first considers cadaveric donation, looking at who can become a donor, and which organs can be taken. England, Scotland, and Wales have introduced opt-out systems, which means that if someone has not opted out, their consent to organ donation will be deemed. It then turns to living organ donation, looking at informed consent and the legitimacy of incentives. Finally, it considers the ethical, practical, and legal obstacles to animal-to-human transplantation.

Chapter

Cover Employment Law

26. Working time  

This chapter looks at the background to the Working Time Regulations, the core working time rights and the specifics of the law. It then considers some of the arguments that have been raised both for and against such regulation. The Working Time Regulations regulate daily rest, weekly working time, weekly rest and annual leave, among other matters. The maximum weekly working time is forty-eight hours, but the UK has retained an opt-out to this, so a person can agree to work more hours. The opt-out remains extremely controversial amongst fellow European Member States. The chapter also considers remedies if the rights are breached.

Book

Cover Medical Law
All books in this flagship series contain carefully selected substantial extracts from key cases, legislation, and academic debate, providing students with a stand-alone resource. Medical Law: Text, Cases, and Materials offers exactly what the title says—all of the explanation, commentary, and extracts from cases and key materials that students need to gain a thorough understanding of this complex topic. Key case extracts provide the legal context, facts, and background; extracts from materials, including from the most groundbreaking writers of today, provide differing ethical perspectives and outline current debates; and the author’s insightful commentary ensures that readers understand the facts of the cases and can navigate the ethical landscape to form their own understanding of medical law. Chapters cover all of the topics commonly found on medical law courses, including a separate chapter on mental health law. This new edition, thoroughly updated, includes: coverage of important new cases in all chapters; the COVID-19 pandemic and its implications; the government’s White Paper on reform of the Mental Health Act; changes to the regulation of clinical trials and medicines in the UK as a result of Brexit; the change in the law on organ donation, which brought in an opt-out system in 2020; expanded coverage of data sharing and mobile technologies; changes to the law on abortion in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland; proposals set out in the Law Commissions’ consultation on reform of the law on surrogacy; and the most recent Assisted Dying Bill in England.