1-20 of 31 Results

  • Keyword: media x
Clear all

Chapter

Essential Cases: Tort Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Stocker v Stocker [2019] UKSC 17. The document also included supporting commentary from author Craig Purshouse.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Tort Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Stocker v Stocker [2019] UKSC 17. The document also included supporting commentary from author Craig Purshouse.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Tort Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Stocker v Stocker [2019] UKSC 17. The document also included supporting commentary from author Craig Purshouse.

Chapter

Benjamin Bowling, Robert Reiner, and James Sheptycki

This chapter synthesizes a theoretical view of police and media which considers not only media content, but also how different kinds of media technologies function as tools in the hands of different kinds of institutional actors. It also considers police-media relations in the light of neo-liberal market conditions. Relations between police and media have traditionally been conceptualized between two poles of argument, on the one side the orthodox/hegemonic and on the other the revisionist/subversive. However, the social fragmentation of ‘postmodern conditions’ at the cusp of the millennium troubled this binary. A common question in thinking about the police and media concerned the manufacture of consent and the creation of socially integrative conditions for policing by consent of the governed. This chapter argues that social conflict and dissensus are functional symptoms of neo-liberal social order in which security has become a commodity. The social disintegration accompanying an over-mediatized society does not inhibit market relations, but it does make policing more difficult.

Chapter

This chapter examines the link between crime and media. It summarizes major themes and debates that have shaped the research agenda, and considers some less well-rehearsed issues such as the changing global communications marketplace, the development of new media technologies, and the significance of these for understanding the connections between crime and media. The chapter is organized as follows. The first section offers some background information and addresses the crucial question of why exploring media images of crime and control is important. The second section considers how scholars have researched crime and media, and presents an overview of the main findings. The third section examines the dominant theoretical and conceptual tools that have been used to understand and explain media representations of crime. The final section considers the evidence for the influence of media representations, both on criminal behaviour and fear of crime.

Chapter

This chapter examines media representations of crime and criminals. It first considers the public's fascination with crime before turning to two main methods traditionally used by criminologists to record the reporting of crime: content analysis and discourse analysis. It then assesses the capacity of media to distort and shape public perceptions of crime, criminality, and the criminal justice system. It also explores the importance of media in forming new narratives such as citizen journalism; how young people and migrants are portrayed in the media; the depiction of crime in novels, television, and film; media classification and censorship; and the fear and panic caused by new technology and new media such as video games. The chapter concludes by describing different kinds of cybercrime such as hacking and identity theft, along with young people's use of the Internet.

Chapter

This chapter focuses on research into various forms of media and their long, complex relationships with crime. In today’s increasingly multi-media world, most people can access crime-related information and stories through a wide variety of media and can publish and distribute their own views and accounts, if they choose. The chapter first outlines some of the ways in which criminologists examine the media and analyse the ways in which it has been used to represent (either directly or indirectly) ‘facts’ and opinions about crime. It then looks at how this can reflect wider and less obvious considerations, such as social concerns and attitudes to different groups, such as young people and migrants, before exploring how crime is depicted in fiction and popular entertainment. Finally, the chapter discusses the effects of media representations of crime, considering the ways in which the media could be seen as criminogenic (causing crime), for example that it can facilitate and provide a platform for crimes, such as cybercrime, and the ways it could be seen to have a positive influence on crime.

Chapter

Course-focused and comprehensive, the Textbook on series provides an accessible overview of the key areas on the law curriculum. This chapter considers some of the influences that shape public perceptions, with particular attention to the impact of media. It then looks at some of the most problematic misconceptions about crime. The chapter illustrates the limitations of public conceptions with two brief case studies which outline specific areas of criminal activity that are not popularly perceived as criminal, namely, ‘white-collar crime’ and ‘corporate crime’.

Chapter

Alisdair A. Gillespie and Siobhan Weare

This chapter considers the fundamental constitutional principle of judges being independent. Securing the independence of the judiciary is difficult and involves not only separation from the legislature and executive, but also from each other and the media. This chapter explores how this separation is upheld and critically examines the practicalities associated with maintaining judicial independence, including judicial salaries, tenure, and promotions. Issues of judicial ethics and restrictions on practice are also discussed.

Chapter

This chapter discusses crime statistics, which, as with any other form of statistical information, are often referred to by the media as if they provide a true measurement of crime. It is now increasingly accepted that criminal statistics provide a deficient guide to both the level of crime and trends in criminal behaviour. There has been a massive increase in the amount of statistical information promulgated about crime in the last few years. This reflects in part the greater sophistication in statistical techniques, but is mostly a consequence of the growing political interest in the criminal justice system and an accompanying call for greater accountability and openness. However, there are some facts that appear incontrovertible from all measurements of crime in England and Wales.

Chapter

This chapter discusses crime statistics, which, as with any other form of statistical information, are often referred to by the media as if they provide a true measurement of crime. It is now increasingly accepted that criminal statistics provide a deficient guide to both the level of crime and trends in criminal behaviour. There has been a massive increase in the amount of statistical information promulgated about crime in the past few years. This reflects in part the greater sophistication in statistical techniques, but is mostly a consequence of the growing political interest in the criminal justice system and an accompanying call for greater accountability and openness. However, there are some facts that appear incontrovertible from all measurements of crime in England and Wales.

Book

Steve Case, Phil Johnson, David Manlow, Roger Smith, and Kate Williams

Criminology is a core, introductory textbook on the field of crime and criminology. It starts by looking at what crime is and the theories that try to explain it. It then considers society's response to crime. It shows how to carry out independent research and plan first steps in a career. The critical, applied approach is emphasized through some of the many features that are integrated throughout the book. These include conversations with authentic voices from the field, compelling personal insights, and challenges to the reader to question assumptions, apply knowledge, and critically reflect on their personal viewpoints. Topics covered include crime statistics, the media, victimology, youth crime, sociological positivism, crime control, punishment, and rehabilitation. The last part of the text applies theories of criminology to the real world and introduces the reader to what might be involved in a career in criminology research.

Chapter

This chapter presents that fact that, in Britain, most of the information that people receive about crime is second-hand. As relatively few people are victims of serious crime, the offending images that are formed in the minds of the majority largely come from reports and discussions in the mass media. Indeed, with growing urbanisation, it is increasingly necessary to rely on the media to find out what has been happening in one’s own neighbourhood. The chapter considers whether the mass media’s reporting of crime has a significant impact on people’s daily lives and their attitudes to ‘law and order’ issues. There is also a body of research evidence suggesting that media portrayals of violent crime may inspire some people to engage in ‘copycat’ incidents.

Chapter

The jury consists of twelve randomly selected members of the public, who decide guilt or innocence in the most serious criminal trials in the Crown Court. This ensures that the general public are represented in the criminal justice system. This chapter explains the rules on eligibility for, and disqualification or excusal from, jury service. It considers issues such as the power of the jury to acquit in defiance of the evidence (‘jury equity’); the confidentiality of jury deliberations and the implications of that for appeals; the ethnic composition of a jury; the rights of both prosecution and defence to challenge jurors; jury vetting; whether juries should be excluded from certain trials, such as those involving serious fraud or where there is evidence of jury ‘tampering’; whether the accused should be able to ‘waive’ their right to jury trial; and the impact of social media on jury trials. It concludes by examining the relative advantages and disadvantages of jury trials.

Chapter

A jury consists of twelve, randomly-selected members of the public, who decide guilt or innocence in the most serious criminal trials in the Crown Court. This chapter explains the rules on eligibility for, and disqualification or excusal from jury service. It considers the power of the jury to acquit in defiance of the evidence (‘jury equity’), the confidentiality of jury deliberations and the implications of that for appeals, the ethnic composition of a jury, whether juries should be excluded from certain trials such as those involving serious fraud or where there is evidence of jury ‘tampering’, whether the accused should be able to ‘waive’ their right to jury trial, and the impact of social media on jury trials. It concludes by examining the relative advantages and disadvantages of jury trials.

Chapter

This chapter presents that fact that, in Britain, most of the information that people receive about crime is second-hand. As relatively few people are victims of serious crime, the offending images that are formed in the minds of the majority largely come from reports and discussions in the mass media. Indeed, with growing urbanisation, it is increasingly necessary to rely on the media to find out what has been happening in one’s own neighbourhood. The chapter considers whether the mass media’s reporting of crime has a significant impact on people’s daily lives and their attitudes to ‘law and order’ issues. There is also a body of research evidence suggesting that media portrayals of violent crime may inspire some people to engage in ‘copycat’ incidents.

Chapter

David Harris, Michael O’Boyle, Ed Bates, and Carla Buckley

This chapter discusses Article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights, which guarantees freedom of expression. It first delineates the boundaries of protection of Article 10. It then turns to different categories of expression; specific issues relating to the press and media licensing; the standard ‘prescribed by law’; legitimate aims; the notion of ‘duties and responsibilities’ of the bearers of expression rights; and some distinct methodologies advanced by the Court to deal with defamation cases.

Chapter

This chapter examines the nature of free speech, first addressing the question of why free speech must be protected. It then discusses Article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR), media freedom, defamation, criminal offences, privacy, and official secrecy.

Chapter

This chapter considers the application of data protection principles within the media and electronic communications sectors. In both areas, the operation of data protection principles has been contentious. Data protection issues are principally concerned with the application of what might be regarded as ‘traditional’ data protection principles in the context of activities where different priorities might legitimately be identified. In some respects, media processing might be compared with law enforcement agencies. Digging out the truth about the unsavoury activities of powerful elements in society might well require the use of tactics and techniques that would be regarded as unfair in more general contexts.

Chapter

This chapter examines antisocial conduct in social media platforms (SMPs), such as Facebook and Twitter, and how it has spawned cases of defamation, blasphemy, and incitement to violence. It first considers how social networking breeds gossip and speculation leading to invasion of privacy, citing the Ryan Giggs case in 2011 and its legal implications of postings on SMPs. After discussing the Neuberger report and the joint committee on privacy and injunctions, the chapter looks at use of SMPs to make criminal threats and organize criminal activity, focusing on the Paul Chambers case and the Facebook riot cases in England. It then analyses cyberbullying, trolling, and harassment on SMPs, concluding with an assessment of the controversial movie that appeared on YouTube entitled ‘Innocence of Muslims’.