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Chapter

This chapter discusses workload management skills. It focuses on managing time for personal effectiveness; developing a project management approach to legal work; key issues of working with and for others; and managing stress.

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This chapter explores trustees’ management powers. The management powers of trustees are concerned with looking after property or funds. They do not allow the trustees to choose who benefits. In addition, the powers of management conferred upon a trustee are not the same in every case. Quite obviously, the powers of express trustees are likely to differ significantly from those of constructive trustees upon whom a trust has been imposed because of their improper conduct. In the latter case, the question of the trustees’ powers rarely arises. They are wrongdoers, who are, by definition, acting in breach of duty. How far they are authorized to act is, therefore, unlikely to be an issue.

Chapter

This chapter explores trustees’ management powers. The management powers of trustees are concerned with looking after property or funds. They do not allow the trustees to choose who benefits. In addition, the powers of management conferred upon a trustee are not the same in every case. Quite obviously, the powers of express trustees are likely to differ significantly from those of constructive trustees upon whom a trust has been imposed because of their improper conduct. In the latter case, the question of the trustees’ powers rarely arises. They are wrongdoers, who are, by definition, acting in breach of duty. How far they are authorized to act is, therefore, unlikely to be an issue.

Chapter

This chapter considers the way in which the court ‘actively manages’ cases. All disputed cases are subject to a level of court management and enforcement of its directions orders. The chapter provides an understanding of the time at which active case management commonly occurs. It explains the ethos of case management, allocation (to track), and case management directions through the tracks. It discusses the ways in which the court will seek to ensure that its orders for the management of a case are complied with.

Chapter

This chapter considers the way in which the court ‘actively manages’ cases. All disputed cases are subject to a level of court management and enforcement of its directions orders. The chapter provides an understanding of the time at which active case management commonly occurs. It explains the ethos of case management, allocation (to track), and case management directions through the tracks. It discusses the ways in which the court will seek to ensure that its orders for the management of a case are complied with.

Chapter

This chapter first considers the project management approach to resolving civil disputes. Such an approach involves following a single overall plan from the first consideration of the legal dispute up to trial. However, the fact that most cases will not in fact reach trial, and that reasonable use of alternative dispute resolution must now be made at all stages, means that any plan must be sufficiently flexible to include review, and that review needs to include options as to process. The chapter then turns to the process of case evaluation, where lawyers value what a case is worth, assess the chances of winning a case, and conduct a cost-benefit analysis. Also discussed are the importance of proportionality in the conduct of litigation and managing and reducing the risk of losing a case.

Chapter

The multi-track deals with a vast range of cases, from simple contractual disputes involving little more than £25,000, to complex commercial cases involving difficult issues of fact and law with values of several million pounds, to cases where perhaps no money is at stake but which raise points of real public importance. Cases on the multi-track will generally be dealt with either in the Royal Courts of Justice or other civil trial centre. This chapter discusses agreed directions; case management conferences; fixing the date for trial; pre-trial checklists; listing hearings; pre-trial review; directions given at other hearings; and variation of case management timetable.

Chapter

The multi-track deals with a vast range of cases, from simple contractual disputes involving little more than £25,000, to complex commercial cases involving difficult issues of fact and law with values of several million pounds, to cases where perhaps no money is at stake but which raise points of real public importance. Cases on the multi-track will generally be dealt with either in the Royal Courts of Justice or other civil trial centre. This chapter discusses agreed directions; case management conferences; fixing the date for trial; pre-trial checklists; listing hearings; pre-trial review; directions given at other hearings; and variation of case management timetable.

Chapter

The multi-track deals with a vast range of cases, from simple contractual disputes involving little more than £25,000, to complex commercial cases involving difficult issues of fact and law with values of several million pounds, to cases where perhaps no money is at stake but which raise points of real public importance. Cases on the multi-track will generally be dealt with either in the Royal Courts of Justice or other civil trial centre. This chapter discusses agreed directions; case management conferences; fixing the date for trial; pre-trial checklists; listing hearings; pre-trial review; directions given at other hearings; and variation of case management timetable.

Chapter

This chapter considers corporate management and focuses on the regulation of those who govern the company, and the protection of the shareholders, who have no automatic right of management. The actual ‘running’ of the company is left to the directors, a relatively small number of persons who may take individual responsibility for aspects of the company’s business or may oversee the company as a whole. Directors have significant powers when acting for the company, and whilst a corporation possesses its own separate legal personality, independent of those who manage it, the actions of the company are performed, under authority provided by statute and the company’s constitution, by its directors. The chapter identifies the appointment of directors and their duties as codified from the common law into the Companies Act (CA) 2006, and the provisions for removing a director.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the skills needed for practical problem-solving. It focuses on understanding the importance of a problem-solving strategy for effective practice; using a variety of problem-solving techniques; and developing an effective risk-management strategy for one’s own work.

Chapter

Statements of case are formal documents used in litigation to define what each party says about the case. This chapter discusses forms of statements of case; particulars of claim defence; counterclaims and set-offs; reply and defence to counterclaim; subsequent statements of case; dispensing with statements of case; Scott schedules; interrelation with case management; and use of statements of case at trial.

Chapter

Statements of case are formal documents used in litigation to define what each party says about the case. This chapter discusses forms of statements of case; particulars of claim defence; counterclaims and set-offs; reply and defence to counterclaim; subsequent statements of case; dispensing with statements of case; Scott schedules; interrelation with case management; and use of statements of case at trial.

Chapter

This chapter discusses study skills for criminology students. It includes practical advice on different approaches to note-taking and organizing notes, time-management and planning, working with others, and getting the most out of seminars and lectures. It also includes an introduction to personal development planning (PDP) as a means of reflecting, planning, and taking action in respect of personal, educational, and career development.

Chapter

Many criminology students will be required to produce a dissertation or research report in their final year. This chapter distinguishes between these two pieces of work and offers practical advice on the requirements of each. It addresses skills such as selecting a workable research question and developing an effective relationship with supervisors, and also provides guidance on how to organize workload and create a suitable structure for a dissertation or report.

Chapter

This chapter discusses active case management and the use of sanctions. The Woolf reforms and more recently the Jackson reforms have supported the concept of active case management, the focus of which is to ensure that cases are dealt with ‘justly’ and ‘at proportionate cost’. The objectives of case management are set out in Civil Procedure Rules (CPR) Part 1 and the courts case management powers are in CPR Part 3. The powers of the court in relation to case management are wide and directions given after the issue of proceedings should provide a framework and timetable for dealing with a case right up to trial. The final section of the chapter deals with the sanctions that might be imposed where there is a failure to comply with case management requirements.

Chapter

This chapter focuses on the management of legal costs. In principle, when assessing costs on a standard basis the court considers the receiving party's last approved or agreed budget, not departing from it unless there is good reason. In several cases the courts have indicated that an approved budget should normally be followed. However, an amount spent will not necessarily be reasonable and proportionate just because it was included in an approved budget. The chapter then discusses orders for costs, covering the principles for costs orders, powers relating to costs, and costs at the interim stage. The final section deals with quantifying costs, including fixed costs and agreed costs, as well as the court's summary assessment of costs and detailed assessments.

Chapter

Statements of case are formal documents used in litigation to define what each party says about the case. This chapter discusses forms of statements of case; particulars of claim defence; counterclaims and set-offs; reply and defence to counterclaim; subsequent statements of case; dispensing with statements of case; Scott schedules; interrelation with case management; and use of statements of case at trial.

Chapter

The Concentrate Questions and Answers series offers the best preparation for tackling exam questions. Each book includes typical questions, diagram answer plans, suggested answers, author commentary, and advice on study skills. This introductory chapter provides an overview of the nature and complexities of the criminal law and the common features of all crimes such as actus reus, mens rea, and the defences. It outlines some techniques for achieving success in criminal law examinations. The chapter notes that to achieve success it is important to exercise good study skills from the outset and learn how to manage your time well. Relevance and structure are vital. Planning answers carefully, and providing critical analysis of the issues raised are essential.

Chapter

All books in this flagship series contain carefully selected substantial extracts from key cases, legislation, and academic debate, providing able students with a stand-alone resource. This chapter addresses the far-reaching issues of ensuring the effective and efficient management of flats. Flat ownership is obtained by granting the flat owner a long lease of his or her flat, with the freehold reversion being held either by an independent landlord or by a company owned collectively by the flat owners. The Commonhold and Leasehold Reform Act 2002 has introduced commonhold to offer a new framework for flat ownership, but, in many cases, it holds few advantages over the long lease where the reversion is collectively owned by the flat lessees through a corporate vehicle.