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Chapter

Cover Partnership and LLP Law

10. LLPs: An Introduction  

This chapter explains the various commercial and legal justifications that gave rise to the creation of Limited Liability Partnerships (LLPs), and gives an overview of similar bodies in different jurisdictions. It explains the legislative scheme by which LLPs were introduced, and how the provisions of company law have been applied.

Chapter

Cover Principles of Banking Law

10. Advisory and Transactional Liability  

Ross Cranston, Emilios Avgouleas, Kristin van Zweiten, Theodor van Sante, and Christoper Hare

The chapter first discusses the general principles governing a bank's liability. One way to approach the topic involves a consideration of the relevant doctrines whereby banks can incur liability. Section I selects just a few such doctrines. Another approach considers the various factual matters which feed into legal decisions about bank liability. The same factors recur across different legal doctrines: indeed, they arise for consideration in other systems of law. This is the focus of Section II. Section III considers advisory liability, which can arise in two ways: a failure to advise where the law imposes a duty to do so, and a failure to advise adequately when a bank assumes the task of advising a customer or third party. Section IV turns to the English law doctrines which have a particular application to transactions involving those the law regards as vulnerable. The final section deals with ‘lender liability’.

Chapter

Cover Pearce & Stevens' Trusts and Equitable Obligations

34. Remedies against the trustee for breach of trust  

This chapter examines the nature of liability for breach of trust. Trusts impose obligations on the trustees, and the trustees can be held liable for breach of trust if their failure to meet the obligations imposed upon them causes a loss. The liability of a trustee for a breach of trust is a personal liability, and any remedy is available only against the trustee as an individual, and not against any specific assets. If the trustee in breach has died, their personal liability continues against their estate. There may be separate remedies in relation to any assets retained by the trustee or in the hands of a third party, and different remedies are also available for breach of fiduciary duty.

Chapter

Cover Steiner and Woods EU Law

9. State Liability  

This chapter outlines the development of the state liability doctrine under European Union (EU) law following the Francovich v Italy case. It explains that the principle of state liability provides individuals with a tool before their national courts to secure the enforcement of their rights under EU law. The chapter examines the scope and the conditions for liability; the criterion of a ‘sufficiently serious’ breach laid down in subsequent cases such as Brasserie du Pêcheur and Factortame and considers that there may be many hurdles to overcome in establishing a successful claim. It analyses its relationship with other Treaty provisions dealing with non-contractual liability.

Chapter

Cover Smith, Hogan, & Ormerod's Text, Cases, & Materials on Criminal Law

3. Causation  

This chapter discusses a general approach to issues of causation in criminal law. Causation is an important feature in the study of crimes. It is especially so in cases of strict liability where, in the absence of mens rea elements, disputes over causation become the most critical issue in determining liability. The chapter examines some recent Supreme Court judgments in which the court has emphasized the important relationship between causation and fault.

Chapter

Cover Steiner & Woods EU Law

9. State liability  

This chapter outlines the development of the state liability doctrine under European Union (EU) law following the Francovich v Italy case. It explains that the principle of state liability provides individuals with a tool before their national courts to secure the enforcement of their rights under EU law. The chapter examines the scope and the conditions for liability; the criterion of a ‘sufficiently serious’ breach laid down in subsequent cases such as Brasserie du Pêcheur and Factortame and considers that there may be many hurdles to overcome in establishing a successful claim. It analyses its relationship with other Treaty provisions dealing with non-contractual liability.

Chapter

Cover Criminal Law Concentrate

10. Participation  

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. This chapter discusses the liability of parties who participate in the criminal acts of others. Liability can be split into four parts: those who are accessories, those who are joint perpetrators, those who are vicariously liable, and those who are corporations. Accessories are those who aid, abet, counsel, or procure the commission of the principal offence. Participants who enter a joint venture (also known as a joint unlawful enterprise) are liable for the crimes committed as part of that venture, unless one of the parties deliberately departs from the agreed plan. The doctrine of vicarious liability has a (limited) role in the criminal law. A corporation is a legal person, so criminal liability can be imposed on a corporation for many (although not all) crimes.

Chapter

Cover Criminal Law

7. Parties to crime  

Michael J. Allen and Ian Edwards

Course-focused and contextual, Criminal Law provides a succinct overview of the key areas on the law curriculum balanced with thought-provoking contextual discussion. This chapter discusses the meaning of accomplices, vicarious liability, joint enterprise liability, and corporate liability. All the parties to a crime are accomplices. The person who perpetrates the crime is the principal. Others, not being principals, who participate in the commission of an offence are referred to as accessories or secondary parties and will be liable to conviction if it is proved that they aided, abetted, counselled, or procured the commission of the crime by the principal. Vicarious liability is a form of strict liability arising from the employer–employee relationship, without reference to any fault of the employer. A corporation is a legal person and therefore may be criminally liable, even though it has no physical existence and cannot act or think except through its directors or employees.

Chapter

Cover Tort Law

11. Occupiers’ liability  

This chapter discusses occupiers’ liability, which deals with the risks posed, and harms caused, by dangerous places and buildings. In such cases, the occupier of the premises may be liable where a person who comes onto their land is injured in or by unsafe premises if the occupier has not taken reasonable care to ensure that those entering are safe. The general principles of negligence have been incorporated into, and modified by, statute in the form of the Occupiers’ Liability Acts 1957 and 1984. Although the Acts define the circumstances in which a duty of care will be owed (and tell us something as to its extent, as well as matters relating to its discharge and limitation), questions of breach and causation still need to be established by reference to the ordinary principles of negligence.

Chapter

Cover Street on Torts

9. Liability for defective premises and structures  

This chapter examines the potential liability for injury and/or other forms of loss arising from being upon or use of defective premises and structures. It explains that there are two types of defendant in this area of negligence. The first are persons actually occupying premises and the second are those who might be liable for defects in the premises including landlords, builders, and professionals such as architects and consulting engineers. Much of the relevant law here is statutory, the common law supplementing the statutory provisions. This chapter discusses the provisions of the Occupiers’ Liability Act 1957, the Occupiers’ Liability Act 1984, and Defective Premises Act 1972.

Chapter

Cover Company Law

6. Corporate capacity and liability  

This chapter focuses on the complex rules regarding who can act on behalf of the company, and how liability can be imposed on the company for the actions of others. A company can enter into a contract by affixing its common seal to the contract, by complying with the rules in ss 44(2)–(8) of the Companies Act 2006 (CA 2006), or by a person acting under the company’s express or implied authority. Section 39 of the CA 2006 provides that a contract cannot be invalidated on the ground that the contract is outside the scope of the company’s capacity. Meanwhile, section 40 of the CA 2006 provides that the power of the directors to bind the company, or authorize others to do so, is free of any limitation under the company’s constitution. The chapter then considers the four methods of liability: personal liability, strict liability, vicarious liability, and liability imposed via attribution.

Chapter

Cover Tort Law

11. Occupiers’ liability  

This chapter discusses occupiers’ liability, which deals with the risks posed, and harms caused, by dangerous places and buildings. In such cases, the occupier of the premises may be liable where a person who comes onto their land is injured in or by unsafe premises if the occupier has not taken reasonable care to ensure that those entering are safe. The general principles of negligence have been incorporated into, and modified by, statute in the form of the Occupiers’ Liability Acts 1957 and 1984. Although the Acts define the circumstances in which a duty of care will be owed (and tell us something as to its extent, as well as matters relating to its discharge and limitation), questions of breach and causation still need to be established by reference to the ordinary principles of negligence.

Chapter

Cover Smith, Hogan, & Ormerod's Text, Cases, & Materials on Criminal Law

25. Liability of corporations  

This chapter discusses the ways in which organizations and their members might be held liable in criminal law. It covers personal liability of individuals within an organization; vicarious liability; corporate liability: by breaching a statutory duty imposed on the organization, by committing strict liability offences, by being liable for the acts of individuals under the identification doctrine, and the specific statutory liability of organizations for homicide under the Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Act 2007; and liability of unincorporated associations.

Chapter

Cover Partnership and LLP Law

11. The Corporate Structure  

This chapter explains the statutory requirements with respect to the formation of an LLP and explains the process by which an LLP is incorporated. It explains how, as an incorporated body, an LLP acts through its members and other agents, and how their acts and their potential wrongdoing can be attributed in law to the LLP itself. It addresses the concept of limited liability that is consequent to an LLP's incorporation, and identifies the obligations that are imposed on an LLP arising from limited liability, in terms of registration and publicity.

Chapter

Cover Sealy & Worthington's Text, Cases, and Materials in Company Law

3. Corporate Activity and Legal Liability  

This chapter discusses how the company acts as a legal person. It covers: contractual liability; corporate capacity; agency and authority in corporate contracting; contracts and the execution of documents; pre-incorporation contracts; corporate gifts; tort liability; criminal liability; whether and in what circumstances knowledge should be imputed to a company or other corporate body; and when attribution can be denied by the company.

Chapter

Cover Sealy & Worthington's Text, Cases, and Materials in Company Law

4. Shareholders as an Organ of the Company  

This chapter discusses how the company acts as a legal person. It covers: contractual liability; corporate capacity; agency and authority in corporate contracting; contracts and the execution of documents; pre-incorporation contracts; corporate gifts; tort liability; criminal liability; whether and in what circumstances knowledge should be imputed to a company or other corporate body; and when attribution can be denied by the company.

Chapter

Cover Lunney & Oliphant's Tort Law

10. Statutory Liability Regimes  

Donal Nolan and Ken Oliphant

Although most of the law of tort is based upon common law principles, there are a number of situations where statutory liability regimes have been created. This chapter focuses on two of these statutory liability regimes, the liability of occupiers to those coming onto their land (governed by the Occupiers’ Liability Acts of 1957 and 1984) and liability in respect of defective products (governed by the Consumer Protection Act 1987). In both these areas Parliament has intervened to remedy perceived failings in the common law. The final part of this chapter considers the common law action for breach of statutory duty. This differs from the action for negligence in that the source of the defendant’s duty is not the common law; rather, the claimant’s case is founded on a breach of a duty imposed on the defendant by Parliament.

Chapter

Cover Tort Law: Text and Materials

11. Special Liability Regimes  

Although much of the law of tort is based upon general common law principles, there are a number of situations where special liability regimes have been created. This chapter focuses on four of these special liability regimes. The first regime to be considered is employers’ liability, whose origins lie in nineteenth-century common law. Two other special regimes are then considered: the liability of occupiers to those coming onto their land (governed by the Occupiers’ Liability Acts of 1957 and 1984) and liability in respect of defective products (governed by the Consumer Protection Act 1987). In both these areas Parliament has intervened to remedy perceived failings in the common law. The final part of this chapter considers the common law action for breach of statutory duty. This differs from the action for negligence in that the source of the defendant’s duty is not the common law; rather, the claimant’s case is founded on a breach of a duty imposed on the defendant by Parliament.

Chapter

Cover Card & James' Business Law

19. Incorporation and bodies corporate  

This chapter examines the law governing incorporation and bodies corporate. It explains that corporate bodies are called such because they are created via the process of incorporation and have corporate personality (and are therefore legal persons), and these types of business entities come in two principal forms, namely companies and limited liability partnerships. It discusses the formation and registration process for these types of businesses and the different types of registered companies. This chapter also describes the advantages of incorporation which include corporate personality, limited liability, and perpetual succession and its disadvantages which include civil liability, criminal liability, and potentially complex regulation.

Chapter

Cover Criminal Law Directions

4. Strict liability  

Without assuming prior legal knowledge, books in the Directions series introduce and guide readers through key points of law and legal debate. Questions, diagrams, and exercises help readers to engage fully with each subject and check their understanding as they progress. This chapter discusses a special form of criminal liability: strict liability (including absolute liability). A strict liability offence is an offence which does not require proof of a fault element (i.e., where the prosecution need not prove at least one mens rea element). An absolute liability offence does not require proof of any mens rea elements. This chapter also evaluates the arguments for and against strict liability and discusses regulatory offences.