1-20 of 27 Results

  • Keyword: legal aid x
Clear all

Chapter

Patrick Nicholls

This chapter examines how families use and access the legal system, and the recent changes in family justice. The procedural aspects of family law claims and the funding of litigation has seen extensive changes in recent years that have heavily influenced the use of the courts by families and the development of the law. The chapter identifies the source of the legal procedures, and explains the underlying policies and rules which must be followed for persons to obtain what orders the family law courts can make. It also examines the impact of cuts to legal aid on the family justice system. The cuts in legal aid have resulted in many more persons acting for themselves before the court as ‘litigants in person’. This has resulted in significant delays which some argue have put the family justice system in crisis and pitched the judiciary against their political counterparts.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the issue of funding litigation. Solicitors have a professional duty to advise clients on litigation funding options. The advice and agreed funding method should be confirmed in writing in a ‘client care letter’. Most commercial clients pay their lawyers under the traditional retainer, normally with an agreed hourly rate. Conditional free agreements (CFAs) or ‘no win, no fee’ agreements allow a lawyer to agree not to charge the client if the proceedings are unsuccessful, but to charge an uplift or ‘success fee’ of up to 100 per cent over the solicitor’s usual costs if the proceedings are successful. Damages-based agreements (DBAs) are a form of contingency fee agreement under which the lawyer is paid out of the sums recovered in the proceedings. Public funding through legal aid is restricted to individuals with modest income and capital, and there are wide exclusions from the scheme.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the issue of funding litigation. Solicitors have a professional duty to advise clients on litigation funding options. The advice and agreed funding method should be confirmed in writing in a ‘client care letter’. Most commercial clients pay their lawyers under the traditional retainer, normally with an agreed hourly rate. Conditional free agreements (CFAs) or ‘no win, no fee’ agreements allow a lawyer to agree not to charge the client if the proceedings are unsuccessful, but to charge an uplift or ‘success fee’ of up to 100 per cent over the solicitor’s usual costs if the proceedings are successful. Damages-based agreements (DBAs) are a form of contingency fee agreement under which the lawyer is paid out of the sums recovered in the proceedings. Public funding through legal aid is restricted to individuals with modest income and capital, and there are wide exclusions from the scheme.

Chapter

Alisdair A. Gillespie and Siobhan Weare

This chapter examines the key issues surrounding the funding of civil litigation and how this impacts upon access to justice. It begins with a discussion of the concept of legal aid before moving on to consider the reforms introduced under the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012, where legal aid has been withdrawn from significant forms of civil litigation and the eligibility criteria for legal aid altered. The roles of alternative funding arrangements and non-legal organizations operating in the provision of legal advice are also explored.

Chapter

This chapter first describes the composition of the magistracy. It then discusses the mode of trial; bail decisions; summary trial; legal aid; other significant actors in the magistrates' court; and specialist magistrates' court hearings.

Chapter

7. Fees  

This chapter focuses on legal fees. It discusses the ways in which lawyers charge fees and the different ways of funding legal costs. It goes on to consider the ethical aspects of fees. The chapter covers conditional fee arrangements (CFAs) and speculative fees, legal expense insurance, hourly fees, and legal proceedings to recover fees. It also discusses legal aid.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the issue of funding litigation. Solicitors have a professional duty to advise clients on litigation funding options. The advice and agreed funding method should be confirmed in writing in a ‘client care letter’. Most commercial clients pay their lawyers under the traditional retainer, normally with an agreed hourly rate. Conditional free agreements (CFAs) or ‘no win, no fee’ agreements allow a lawyer to agree not to charge the client if the proceedings are unsuccessful, but to charge an uplift or ‘success fee’ of up to 100 per cent over the solicitor’s usual costs if the proceedings are successful. Damages-based agreements (DBAs) are a form of contingency fee agreement under which the lawyer is paid out of the sums recovered in the proceedings. Public funding through legal aid is restricted to individuals with modest income and capital, and there are wide exclusions from the scheme.

Chapter

This chapter focuses on how legal services, in particular litigation, to the less well-off and the poor are paid for. It considers first the radically changed shape of legal aid and publicly funded legal services. It discusses developments designed to control the costs of litigation. It summarizes new ideas that have been developing for the funding of litigation and improving access to justice. Finally it asks whether other processes—alternatives to courts—might be better at providing cost effective and proportionate dispute resolution services.

Chapter

This chapter focuses on how legal services, in particular litigation, to the less well off and the poor are paid for. It considers first the radically changed shape of the legal aid scheme and publicly funded legal services in recent years and then discusses the developments designed to control the costs of litigation. It summarizes new ideas for the funding of litigation and improving access to justice. It considers the contribution of the legal profession and approaches to re-engineering the system, finally asking whether new processes—alternatives to the courts—might be better at providing cost effective and proportionate dispute resolution services.

Chapter

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. This chapter addresses funding access to the English legal system. Funding legal services may be provided publicly or privately. Public funding relates to funding available from the state, whereas private funding specifically refers to the assets and monetary resources available to that specific individual. Only certain individuals are entitled to benefit from public funding, whilst all persons can, in theory, privately fund legal services. Moreover, legal aid — meaning state-funded assistance in legal matters — is available in both criminal and civil cases but is restricted to narrow circumstances and types of cases. The availability of legal aid depends on several tests set by the government. Where legal aid is not available and the individual cannot privately fund their case, pro bono institutions may be available to provide advice.

Chapter

This chapter describes some of the ways in which civil disputes are played out in the courts, illustrating some of the various dynamics and problems that occur. It discusses claims consciousness; legal aid; other ways to acquire legal services; litigation; settlement; obtaining damages; and appeals.

Chapter

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. This chapter addresses funding access to the English legal system. Funding legal services may be provided publicly or privately. Public funding relates to funding available from the state, whereas private funding specifically refers to the assets and monetary resources available to that specific individual. Only certain individuals are entitled to benefit from public funding, whilst all persons can, in theory, privately fund legal services. Moreover, legal aid—meaning state-funded assistance in legal matters—is available in both criminal and civil cases but is restricted to narrow circumstances and types of cases. The availability of legal aid depends on several tests set by the government. Where legal aid is not available and the individual cannot privately fund their case, pro bono institutions may be available to provide advice.

Chapter

This chapter addresses the issues and arguments surrounding access to justice. The chapter considers the recent reforms and proposed changes to legal aid provision. There is an outline of the basic principles relating to public funding in both civil and criminal cases. Different methods of funding civil legal representation are discussed including CFAs and DBAs. Organisations involved in giving legal advice on a pro bono basis, including Citizens Advice Bureaux and law centres, are also included. in the discussion about the availability of legal advice. The chapter aims to stimulate thought about the idea of access to justice and whether such access is fair and open to all in England and Wales.

Chapter

This chapter addresses the issues and arguments surrounding access to justice. The chapter considers the recent changes and proposed changes to legal aid provision. There is an outline of the basic principles relating to public funding in both civil and criminal cases. Different methods of funding civil legal representation are discussed including CFAs and DBAs. Organisations involved in giving legal advice include Citizens’ Advice Bureaux and law centres are also included in the discussion about the availability of legal advice.

Chapter

This chapter focuses on the magistrates' courts. It discusses the importance of the magistracy; the involvement (and funding) of lawyers in summary justice; significant pre-trial decisions (including bail and mode of trial); how magistrates and their advisers measure up to the crime control/due process models of criminal justice; and the future of summary justice (including the impact of managerialist and ‘victim rights’ reforms).

Chapter

Anna Carline and Roxanna Dehaghani

The chapter examines how, historically, domestic violence was considered to be a private matter that was none of the law's concern. While domestic violence is now recognised to be an important social issue, the historical acceptance of such abuse provides a context to understand some of the difficulties that victims face today. A key focus of the chapter is the family law remedies available for domestic abuse victims. Three key remedies are examined: non-molestation orders, occupation orders, and forced marriage protection orders. The chapter also explores some of the wider factors pertaining to the family justice system's response to domestic violence. It is important to recognise the impact of the changes to legal aid as introduced by the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012, and the extent to which victims of domestic violence may feel threatened during family law proceedings, particularly in cases involving the arrangements for children after separation.

Chapter

All books in this flagship series contain carefully selected substantial extracts from key cases, legislation, and academic debate, providing able students with a stand-alone resource. This chapter begins with an overview of families and family law in England and Wales today. It then discusses themes and issues in contemporary family law, covering rules versus discretion; women’s and men’s perspectives on family law; sex and gender identity; sexual orientation; cultural diversity; and state intervention versus private ordering, including the role of the family court and of non-court dispute resolution in family cases, and challenges facing the family justice system.

Chapter

Alisdair A. Gillespie and Siobhan Weare

This chapter examines how litigation is funded. It considers the growth, and eventual decline, in legal aid, and how alternative sources of funding have begun to be used. The chapter considers both criminal and civil litigation. It notes how there is an increase in defendants-in-person before the criminal courts because of restrictions in legal aid. It questions whether this is appropriate, particularly where the loss of liberty is a real possibility. The chapter also considers how civil litigation is now funded. This includes how ‘no win, no fee’ arrangements were at first encouraged, but then subject to restrictions because it was felt the balance of risk vs. gain was inappropriate. The chapter charts the growth of before and after-the-event insurance, and the increase in third-party funding where the litigation is for large sums of money.

Chapter

This chapter focuses on the magistrates’ courts. It discusses the importance of the magistracy and the work that they do; the involvement (and funding) of lawyers in summary justice; major pre-trial decisions such as bail and whether a case can be dealt with in the magistrates’ court or is so serious that it needs to be sent to the Crown court (mode of trial/allocation); how magistrates and their legal advisors measure up to the crime control/due process models of criminal justice; and the future of summary justice (including the impact of managerialist and ‘victim rights’ reforms and trends that encourage dealing with much lower court business away from the courtroom itself).

Chapter

Essential Cases: Public Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R (on the application of Public Law Project) v Secretary of State for Justice [2016] UKSC 39, Supreme Court. The Court was asked to consider whether the Henry VIII powers granted under the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 permitted the Secretary of State for Justice to introduce a residency test into the provisions regulating legal aid. The case raises wider questions about the oversight and review of Henry VIII powers. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Thomas Webb.