1-17 of 17 Results

  • Keyword: learning x
Clear all

Chapter

While a good part of legal education will take place in classrooms and lecture theatres, successful learning in law also relies to a great extent on individual, autonomous study: reading, research, thinking, and reflecting. Learning law is about much more than what and how law is taught. This chapter looks at the crucial role of the student in the learning process, and how they may be able to enhance their learning in law by understanding learning strengths and working with them. It also focuses on effective reading, research, note making, and reflection — how to make best use of time and the materials available.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the processes of continued learning and development throughout one’s legal career. It focuses on how experiential learning happens; how to use personal experiences to become more proficient; and self-development activities.

Chapter

This chapter focuses on reflective learning and how it should be used by the criminology student to make the most of his/her degree. It guides the students on how to: engage with a reflective learning approach for enhancing their higher education; identify methods for independent learning in the different levels of higher education; apply reflective learning to their employability; and consider how their personal learning journey could help future directions of study for the discipline of criminology. The chapter encourages the students to do something with their newly acquired criminological knowledge and understanding. It also suggests how the core elements of reflective learning practice can be applied to the student's independent learning and official identity as an undergraduate.

Chapter

Every law programme will make use of a range of different teaching opportunities, with differing aims and approaches — all designed to help the student to learn. This chapter looks at the different classes the student may come across during their legal studies, particularly lectures, tutorials, and seminars, and how to get the best out of them. Although many law schools take a largely traditional approach to teaching and learning, they may come across different approaches, such as problem-based learning, peer learning, or clinical legal education. These may be found within individual modules or across the whole curriculum, and embedded in the teaching structure or just used to enhance a more traditional approach.

Chapter

Celebrated for their conceptual clarity, titles in the Clarendon Law Series offer concise, accessible overviews of major fields of law and legal thought. This chapter examines the strategies Equity has developed to ensure the return of property that has fallen into the wrong hands. It focuses on the law of unjust enrichment, the third branch of the law of obligations that provides remedies whenever defendants receive some benefit, or enrichment, at the claimant's expense in circumstances that make it unjust for them to keep it. Equity's role in the law of unjust enrichment is highly controversial, and has been the subject of some profound and difficult modern revisions. To understand these debates it is first necessary to understand when and why any unjust enrichment remedies are warranted. How this model is structured determines, in large measure, how easily Common Law and Equitable learning on this issue can be integrated.

Chapter

13. Biological and psychological positivism  

Determined to predetermine

This chapter examines the contribution of biology and psychology to our understanding of crime and its causes from the perspective of individual positivism — those aspects of positivist criminological explanations that look for diffrences between criminal and non-criminal populations. It traces the development of biological and psychological positivist thinking from its roots in the nineteenth century through to more modern approaches in the twenty-first century where these biological and psychological traits are merely seen as one factor which may increase the likelihood of criminality rather than causing it. The chapter identifies the main biological and psychological theories relating to criminology and discusses the arguments of positivists regarding punishment and rehabilitation as a means to deal with offenders or criminals. It concludes with an analysis of learning theories that see most criminality as a product of learned behaviour.

Chapter

Andrew Sanders, Richard Young, and Mandy Burton

Course-focused and comprehensive, the Textbook on series provides an accessible overview of the key areas on the law curriculum. This chapter examines the relationship between intelligence and learning and criminality. The discussions cover the legal definition of low intelligence; how to measure intelligence; the link between crime and intellect; criticisms on intelligence and criminality; the danger of linking criminality and IQ; learning structures; differential association; differential reinforcement theory; social learning theory and cognitive social learning theories; media and crime; and practical implications for learning theories.

Book

Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. Essential Cases provides you with succinct summaries of some of the landmark and most influential cases in equity and trusts. Each summary begins with a review of the main case facts and decision. The summary is then concluded with expert commentary on the case from the author, Derek Whayman, including his assessment of the wider questions raised by the decision.

Chapter

When a student begins studying law at university, they will be greeted with a plethora of new and unfamiliar sources that they will need to discover and explore. Part of the learning journey is navigating the way to the right resources and using them to guide to greater understanding. Finding relevant and appropriate legal resources can be one of the biggest challenges the student may face when arriving at university. This chapter considers the various resources available in the modern university — both traditional library resources and additional digital resources. It also considers resources in the wider context of the changing nature of legal study, the increasing use of technology, and the accessibility of sources.

Chapter

This chapter highlights employability and career learning. The term ‘employability’ refers to the skills, attributes, and knowledge individuals need for successful careers. Many higher education institutions now include employability as an integral part of undergraduate courses. It may feel a little daunting to focus on employability while grappling with the demands of criminology studies, but both challenges can be tackled simultaneously. Developing an understanding of what employers are looking for will lead to more effective and targeted employability development, and taking the time to explore career options will result in better decision-making. The chapter introduces various tools and techniques to use to support employability development and career planning.

Book

Essential Cases: Equity & Trusts provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. Essential Cases provides you with succinct summaries of some of the landmark and most influential cases in equity and trusts. Each summary begins with a review of the main case facts and decision. The summary is then concluded with expert commentary on the case from the author, Derek Whayman, including his assessment of the wider questions raised by the decision.

Chapter

1. Becoming a student  

Tips, tricks, and tools for effective learning

This chapter describes the skills required to become an effective, engaged, and employable — or E3 — student of criminology in the university, higher education context. More specifically, it introduces a series of learning tips, tricks, and tools that are intended to make the E3 student a successful, capable, and committed individual who is attractive to employers. The chapter presents the criminology student's route to effectiveness, engagement, and employability as a reflective journey that he/she can embark upon in an informed, active, and critical way. Central to this journey is the identification and utilisation of the ‘travel partners’ located at the university and in the student's department, subject area, programme of study, and classroom. This chapter also considers a range of services, facilities, and people that can help students, including international students and those with disability, to meet their health, well-being, domestic, social, and academic needs.

Chapter

14. Sociological positivism  

Determined to predetermine

This chapter examines whether crime can be explained from a sociological perspective. Many sociological theories are positivist and argue that the behaviour of each individual is, to an extent, predetermined. This means that offenders are at least partially (often almost wholly) directed by forces outside the control of the individual. What sociological theorists generally suggest is that particular social or societal changes or factors may influence criminal behaviour. This chapter first describes three distinct types of sociological theories: social intervention or social process theories, social structural theories, and social conflict theories. It then considers key concepts in sociology, including socialisation, and the contribution of the Chicago school to the study of criminology, with particular emphasis on its social disorganisation theory. It also looks at the basic concepts of anomie, strain, subculture, and social learning in relation to crime and/or delinquency.

Chapter

This chapter presents the concept of mental disorder in contrast with the possible physiological influences in criminal behaviour. The idea behind the concept is that the underlying causes are not physical in nature, but are due to the workings of the ‘mind’. The chapter begins with a consideration of whether differences in individuals’ cognitive capacity-or, as it is usually called, intelligence-can have any bearing on the likelihood of their acting in an antisocial manner. It also discusses the definition of ‘learning disability’, a legal classification defined as a state of arrested or incomplete development of the mind, which includes significant impairment of intelligence and social functioning.

Chapter

30. Journeying into employability and careers  

From university to the workplace

This chapter helps the criminology student think about what comes next by guiding him/her through some of the career options he/she is likely to have after completing his/her degree. It also provides a strategy for achieving the skills and attributes employers expect to see in contemporary undergraduates. The chapter first considers employers' perceptions of graduate employability skills before explaining how students can produce their graduate employability and refine it through a strategy of reflection, assessment, reaction, and evaluation (RARE). It then offers suggestions on how the students can journey into potential careers' opportunities with ‘criminal justice game changers’ by engaging with career development learning and experiences from people in these careers. It also describes an alternative approach that the student can take into account for different careers that require the attributes for self-employability.

Chapter

This chapter presents the concept of mental disorder, in contrast to the possible physiological influences in criminal behaviour. The idea behind the concept is that the underlying causes are not physical in nature, but are due to the workings of the ‘mind’. The chapter begins with a consideration of whether differences in individuals’ cognitive capacity—or, as it is usually called, intelligence—can have any bearing on the likelihood of their acting in an antisocial manner. It also discusses the definition of ‘learning disability’, a legal classification defined as a state of arrested or incomplete development of the mind, which includes significant impairment of intelligence and social functioning.

Chapter

Scott Slorach, Judith Embley, Peter Goodchild, and Catherine Shephard

This chapter first explains the fundamental oral communication skills law students need, including non-verbal communication such as eye contact and body language. It then shows students how to use these skills to deliver an effective presentation during legal studies, whether in class, for an assessment, or otherwise, such as in a law clinic. It then goes on to develop these skills for practice, and provides guidance as to why, when, and how a lawyer must employ persuasive oral communication with clients.