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Chapter

Cover Contract Law

12. Breach of contract and termination  

This chapter examines breach of contract and the remedy of termination. It discusses: (1) what constitutes breach of contract; (2) the types of breach that will entitle a claimant to elect whether to end (terminate) the contract and sue for damages; namely, conditions and innominate terms the breach of which deprive the claimant of substantially the whole benefit expected under the contract; (3) how terms are classified into conditions, warranties, and innominate terms; (4) the nature and effect of terminating a contract; (5) when the claimant can insist on continuing with performance (affirmation) when the defendant does not want to perform the contract; and (4) the additional special remedies available to consumers in certain cases.

Chapter

Cover Cheshire, Fifoot, and Furmston's Law of Contract

18. Performance and Breach  

M P Furmston

This chapter discusses the law on performance and breach of contact. It covers the order of performance; excuses for non-performance; whether a party who does not perform perfectly can claim payment or performance from the other party; whether an innocent party who has paid in advance can recover his payment in the event of a failure of perfect performance; whether the innocent party can terminate the contract; the effect of a repudiation or a fundamental breach; the effect of discharging the contract for a bad reason, when a good reason also exists; contractual provisions for termination; stipulations as to time; and tender of performance.

Chapter

Cover Cheshire, Fifoot, and Furmston's Law of Contract

7. Unenforceable Contracts  

M P Furmston

This chapter and the next five chapters deal with cases where what looks like a contract turns out to be in someway defective. The ‘unenforceable contract’ resulted from procedural rather than substantive law. The origin of this position can be found in the passage, as long ago as 1677, of the Statute of Frauds. This chapter, which examines the history of this statute and its surviving effects in the modern law, discusses the Law of Property (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1989; other rules about form; and the law on writing, signature, and electronic commerce.

Chapter

Cover Borkowski's Textbook on Roman Law

9. Obligations: Common Principles and Obligations Arising from Contracts  

This chapter discusses the Roman law of obligations. The ‘obligation’, as a seminal part of Roman (and indeed modern) private law, is a legal tie created between individuals on account of voluntary interactions (such as contracts) or involuntary interactions (such as delicts). It begins with a general discussion of the nature and classification of obligations. This is an important aspect of the discussion as it links this particular branch of private law to other areas of Roman private law. It then covers the general features of Roman contracts; consensual contracts; verbal contracts; contracts re; contracts litteris; innominate contracts; pacts; and the quasi-contract. The next chapter is devoted to the other source of obligations, namely delicts and quasi-delicts. These two sources of obligations, namely contract and delict, form the substance of the law of obligations.

Chapter

Cover Cheshire, Fifoot, and Furmston's Law of Contract

14. Privity of Contract  

M P Furmston

This chapter discusses the doctrine of privity of contract. It covers exceptions to doctrine, the Contracts (Rights of Third Parties) Act 1999; and attempts to impose liability upon nonparties to the contract.

Chapter

Cover Contract Law

1. Introduction  

This introduction provides an overview of contracts and the law of contract. It first explains what the law of contract is about and why it matters before discussing the tasks of contract law. It then considers the role of debates in contract law, unity and diversity in contract law, and central issues in contract law. It also examines the main perspectives about contract that have influenced English law, including perspectives that used to be historically important. In particular, it explores the notions of bargains and the will. The chapter goes on to address two very different understandings of contracts: one that sees it primarily as a bundle of rights, and one that sees it as a relationship between the parties.

Chapter

Cover Anson's Law of Contract

15. Discharge for Breach  

Jack Beatson, Andrew Burrows, and John Cartwright

If one of the parties to a contract breaches an obligation which the contract imposes, that party is in breach of contract. The breach may consist in the non-performance of the relevant obligation, or its performance in a manner or at a time that fails to comply with the requirements of the contract. This chapter sets out the rules governing the discharge of a contract by breach. It shows that the breach may give rise to discharge only if it is sufficiently serious in its effects (a breach which ‘goes to the root of the contract’, or a ‘repudiation’ of the contract) or if it is a breach of a sufficiently serious term of the contract (breach of ‘condition’).

Chapter

Cover Koffman, Macdonald & Atkins' Law of Contract

1. Introduction to the study of contract law  

This chapter introduces some of the key ideas that will be encountered in the rest of the book, such as what is required for a contract. It touches upon the everyday role of contract, and that, although the book is heavily concerned with case law, contract disputes are often resolved without resort to the courts. It also introduces the idea of the evolution of contract law with the changing nature of society: the limitations placed on the use of an idea, such as ‘freedom of contract’, through recognition of the impact of inequality of bargaining power. Additionally, it alerts the reader to the impact of the EU and Brexit.

Chapter

Cover Cheshire, Fifoot, and Furmston's Law of Contract

20. Discharge Under the Doctrine of Frustration  

M P Furmston

This chapter begins with a discussion of the nature and rationale of the doctrine of frustration. It then explains the operation of the doctrine, covering the effect when parties expressly provide for the frustrating event; how a party cannot rely upon self-induced frustration; and the controversy as to whether the doctrine of frustration applies to a lease. The chapter then turns to the effect of the doctrine, covering the Law Reform (Frustrated Contracts) Act 1943 and contracts excluded from the Act.

Chapter

Cover Cheshire, Fifoot, and Furmston's Law of Contract

21. Remedies for Breach of Contract  

M P Furmston

This chapter discusses remedies for breach of contract. It covers damages (remoteness of damage and measure of damages; mitigation; contributory negligence; liquidated damages and penalties; and deposits, part payments, and forfeitures), specific performance (specific performance a discretionary remedy; the principle of mutuality; and the remedy of injunction), and extinction of remedies (the statutory time limits; effect of defendant’s fraud; extension of time in case of disability; effect of acknowledgement or part payment; and effect of lapse of time on equitable claims).

Chapter

Cover Business Law Concentrate

5. Contract IV: discharge of contract and remedies for breach  

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for and how to achieve extra marks. This chapter focuses on contract law. It discusses the discharge of contracts and the remedies for breach of contract where one of the parties has failed in their contractual obligations. Contracts can be discharged through performance, agreement, frustration, or breach. In the event of frustration, the parties can establish their own remedies or they can rely on the provisions developed through the Law Reform (Frustrated Contracts) Act 1943. Remedies have been established through the common law and equity. Damages are the primary remedy in most cases, but equitable remedies include specific performance, injunctions, and rectification.

Chapter

Cover Anson's Law of Contract

16. Discharge by Operation of Law  

Jack Beatson, Andrew Burrows, and John Cartwright

This chapter considers the rules of law which, operating upon certain sets of circumstances, will bring about the discharge of a contract. The discussions cover mergers, discharged by judgment of a court, alteration or cancellation of a written instrument, and bankruptcy.

Chapter

Cover Anson's Law of Contract

17. Damages  

Jack Beatson, Andrew Burrows, and John Cartwright

This Chapter discusses damages and other remedies for breach of contract. It covers the compensatory nature of damages, basis of assessment of damages, causation, remoteness, mitigation, assessment of damages in contracts for the sale of goods, claimants’ contributory negligence, the tax element in damages, interest, and agreed damages clauses (contrasting penalty clauses).

Chapter

Cover JC Smith's The Law of Contract

26. Anticipatory breach of contract  

This chapter examines the doctrine of anticipatory breach, which occurs where, before the time comes for A to perform their part of the contract, A declares that A is not going to do so. This repudiation of the contractual obligation is itself a breach of contract. The innocent party may choose to either accept or reject an anticipatory breach. If they accept, the contract is terminated and the innocent party can sue for damages immediately. If the anticipatory breach is rejected, then the contract remains on foot. If the innocent party elects not to accept the breach and to keep the contract alive, then they may proceed to perform their side of the bargain and sue for the contract price. However, it appears that this action for the agreed sum, or action in debt, may not succeed if the innocent party had no ‘legitimate interest’ in taking such steps.

Chapter

Cover JC Smith's The Law of Contract

28. Agreed remedies  

This chapter focusses on remedies agreed by the parties for breach of contract. Parties may wish to include a term in the contract which dictates what should happen in the event of breach of contract. If the term states that a certain amount of money should be paid upon breach, that term might be valid as a liquidated damages clause or unenforceable as a penalty. If the amount chosen is a genuine pre-estimate of loss, or is ‘commercially justified’, then it is likely to be valid. If the defaulting party had already paid money to the innocent party as a deposit, the innocent party may be able to forfeit that deposit. A term stipulating that specific performance or an injunction will be granted upon breach will not bind the court. However, the court may take into account such a term when deciding whether to exercise its equitable discretion.

Chapter

Cover Contract Law

10. Identifying and interpreting contractual terms  

This chapter examines how the contract terms that bind the parties are identified and interpreted. It also considers the special problems arising from standard form contracts. We will see how words or conduct that generate expectations are classified into terms within the contract or mere representations outside the contract, with very different remedial consequences; how express terms can be augmented by implied terms and collateral terms; how terms that are often unread (eg in standard form contracts) are made enforceable by signature, reasonable notice, previous dealing, or custom; how terms are interpreted; and, in particular, how troublesome clauses that exclude or limit liability are interpreted.

Chapter

Cover Contract Law

4. Privity  

Can a contract alter the rights and liabilities of a third party who is not privy to the contract? This chapter addresses the following questions: (1) Why is the general rule that only contract parties can sue on a contract? (2) What rights of enforcement does the Contract (Rights of Third Parties) Act 1999 confer on a third party? (3) What is the impact of the 1999 Act on the requirement that a contract claimant must have given consideration? (4) To what extent can a promisee enforce a contract for the benefit of a third party? (5) Aside from the 1999 Act, what legal avenues exist for third parties to enforce promises made for their benefit? (6) When and how does a contract bind third parties?

Chapter

Cover O'Sullivan & Hilliard's The Law of Contract

1. General themes and issues  

Titles in the Core Text series take the reader straight to the heart of the subject, providing focused, concise, and reliable guides for students at all levels. This chapter offers an introduction to the law of contract and contract theory. It explains that the law of contract provides the ground rules for what is needed for a contract to be valid and enforceable and for resolving disputes. It introduces the reader to key themes and concepts in the law of contract, and considers the crucial borderlines with others legal subjects, such as tort, restitution and public law. This chapter also considers some international developments beyond the domestic law of contract.

Chapter

Cover Cheshire, Fifoot, and Furmston's Law of Contract

1. Historical Introduction  

M P Furmston

This chapter discusses the history of English contract law. It covers the medieval law; the origin of assumpsit; assumpsit and debt; the doctrine of consideration; and contract law in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries.

Book

Cover Card & James' Business Law
Card & James’ Business Law provides analysis of the English legal system, contract law, the law of torts, company law, and employment law, with online chapters providing further discussion relating to the economic torts, corporate governance, the sale of goods, consumer credit, and the law relating to unfair and illegal commercial practices. All of this is discussed using relevant examples from the business environment, and the key legal cases to help develop a greater understanding of the interconnections between the law and the corporate setting. Part I of the book looks at the English legal system. Part II looks at the law of contract including the formation, terms, exclusion clauses, and remedies. Part III looks at the law of torts in detail. Part IV considers partnership and company law including business structures, the constituents of a company, shares, capital maintenance, shareholders remedies, and corporate rescue. Finally, Part V is about employment law.