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David Ormerod and Karl Laird

This chapter deals with further homicide and related offences. It discusses offences ancillary to murder, solicitation and threats to kill, the offence of concealment of birth, complicity in suicide, mercy killing and suicide pacts as well as the Suicide Act 1961. The chapter also covers offences of infanticide, child destruction and abortion. Finally, it then moves on to provide an overview of the offences under the Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims Acts 2004 and 2012 of causing or allowing a child or vulnerable adult to be killed or caused serious injury. The chapter examines the recent line of case law from the House of Lords and the Supreme Court considering whether the absolute prohibition on assisted suicide violates rights guaranteed in the European Convention on Human Rights.

Chapter

This chapter deals with further homicide and related offences. It discusses offences ancillary to murder, solicitation and threats to kill, the offence of concealment of birth, complicity in suicide, mercy killing, and suicide pacts as well as the Suicide Act 1961 and proposals for reform. The chapter also covers offences of infanticide, child destruction, and abortion. Finally, it then moves on to provide an overview of the offences under the Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims Acts 2004 and 2012 of causing or allowing a child or vulnerable adult to be killed or caused serious injury. The chapter examines the recent line of case law from the House of Lords and the Supreme Court considering whether the absolute prohibition on assisted suicide violates rights guaranteed in the European Convention on Human Rights.

Chapter

This chapter discusses homicide in the criminal law, which can be divided into the following categories: murder, manslaughter, infanticide, and a number of specific offences concerned with causing death while driving—with the first two categories being by far the most important. It considers suicide pacts, mercy killing, and euthanasia; homicide statistics; non-homicide killings; and diminished responsibility. Significant academic and political energy is put into homicide law, considering the relatively few homicide offences that take place each year. What this reveals is that the law’s approach to homicide has great symbolic importance in both political and legal terms.

Chapter

Without assuming prior legal knowledge, books in the Directions series introduce and guide readers through key points of law and legal debate. Questions, diagrams, and exercises help readers to engage fully with each subject and check their understanding as they progress. This chapter explores the elements of murder and the partial defences which reduce a defendant’s liability to voluntary manslaughter. Murder is a common law offence that is committed when a defendant unlawfully causes the death of a person with an intention to kill or cause grievous bodily harm (GBH). Where a defendant has both the actus reus and mens rea for murder, but also has one of three special, partial defences available to him, his liability for murder is reduced to that of manslaughter (voluntary manslaughter). Loss of control, diminished responsibility, suicide pact, and infanticide are also discussed.

Chapter

This chapter discusses homicide in the criminal law, which can be divided into the following categories: murder, manslaughter, infanticide, and a number of specific offences concerned with causing death while driving. It considers suicide pacts, mercy killing, and euthanasia, homicide statistics, non-homicide killings, and diminished responsibility. Significant academic and political energy is put into homicide law, given the relatively few homicide offences that take place each year. What this reveals is that the law’s approach to homicide has great symbolic importance in both political and legal terms.

Chapter

Without assuming prior legal knowledge, books in the Directions series introduce and guide readers through key points of law and legal debate. Questions, diagrams, and exercises help readers to engage fully with each subject and check their understanding as they progress. This chapter explores the elements of murder and the partial defences which reduce a defendant’s liability to voluntary manslaughter. Murder is a common law offence that is committed when a defendant unlawfully causes the death of a person with an intention to kill or cause grievous bodily harm (GBH). Where a defendant has both the actus reus and mens rea for murder, but also has one of three special, partial defences available to him, his liability for murder is reduced to that of manslaughter (voluntary manslaughter). Loss of control, diminished responsibility, suicide pact, and infanticide are also discussed.

Chapter

This chapter considers homicide offences, including murder, voluntary and involuntary manslaughter, infanticide, corporate manslaughter and causing death by dangerous or careless driving. Homicide may be classified as lawful or unlawful. Essentially the actus reus elements of murder, manslaughter and infanticide are the same – the defendant needs to have unlawfully caused another’s death. However, unlike murder, involuntary manslaughter and infanticide have additional actus reus requirements. The key difference though is that the mens rea requirement for involuntary manslaughter and infanticide is lower than that for murder. Additionally, a person who is guilty of murder would have their liability reduced to voluntary manslaughter if one of the partial defences (loss of control, diminished responsibility and suicide pact) was successfully raised.cor