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Chapter

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Barnes [2004] EWCA Crim 3246, Court of Appeal. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Dica [2004] EWCA Crim 1103, Court of Appeal. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Dica [2004] EWCA Crim 1103, Court of Appeal. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Barnes [2004] EWCA Crim 3246, Court of Appeal. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Dica [2004] EWCA Crim 1103, Court of Appeal. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Barnes [2004] EWCA Crim 3246, Court of Appeal. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

Without assuming prior legal knowledge, books in the Directions series introduce and guide readers through key points of law and legal debate. Questions, diagrams, and exercises help readers to engage fully with each subject and check their understanding as they progress. This chapter first discusses the five main non-fatal offences against the person: assault (also referred to as ‘common assault’); battery; assault occasioning actual bodily harm; maliciously wounding or inflicting grievous bodily harm; and wounding or causing grievous bodily harm with intent. It also examines the defence of consent, and the two poisoning offences which are indictable only: maliciously administering poison or a noxious thing so as to endanger life or inflict grievous bodily harm under s.23 of the Offences Against the Person Act 1861; and maliciously administering poison or a noxious thing with intent to injure, aggrieve, or annoy, contrary to s.24 of the same Act.

Chapter

Without assuming prior legal knowledge, books in the Directions series introduce and guide readers through key points of law and legal debate. Questions, diagrams, and exercises help readers to engage fully with each subject and check their understanding as they progress. This chapter first discusses the five main non-fatal offences against the person: assault (also referred to as ‘common assault’), battery, assault occasioning actual bodily harm, maliciously wounding or inflicting grievous bodily harm, and wounding or causing GBH with intent. It also examines the defence of consent, and the two poisoning offences which are indictable only: maliciously administering poison or a noxious thing so as to endanger life or inflict GBH under s.23 of the Offences Against the Person Act 1861; and maliciously administering poison or a noxious thing with intent to injure, aggrieve, or annoy, contrary to s.24 of the same Act.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Criminal Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in R v Cristea [2021] EWCA Crim 1597, Court of Appeal. The document also included supporting commentary from author Jonathan Herring.

Chapter

This chapter deals with non-fatal offences against the person. Many offences, such as battery and common assault, cannot be committed if the victim gives a valid consent. This chapter first assesses the relevance of the victim’s consent to the liability for a non-fatal offence against the person before turning to a number of non-fatal offences against the person, including assault and battery, assault or battery occasioning actual bodily harm, maliciously inflicting grievous bodily harm (GBH) or a wound and causing GBH or a wound with intent to cause GBH. The chapter discusses a number of statutes that govern non-fatal offences against the person, such as the Offences Against the Person Act 1861, the Police Act 1996 and the Crime and Disorder Act 1998.

Chapter

Michael J. Allen and Ian Edwards

Course-focused and contextual, Criminal Law provides a succinct overview of the key areas on the law curriculum balanced with thought-provoking contextual discussion. This chapter discusses the main non-fatal offences involving violence against the person. Non-fatal offences include assault and battery, assault occasioning actual bodily harm, wounding and inflicting grievous bodily harm, wounding or causing grievous bodily harm with intent, administering poison, and offences related to explosive substances and corrosive fluids (including offences related to ‘acid attacks’). The chapter analyses in detail consent as a defence to non-fatal offences against the person, including discussion of recent case law on whether consent is a defence to acts of ‘body modification’. The chapter also outlines necessity and lawful correction. The chapter’s ‘The Law in Context’ feature examines the scope of ‘hate crime’ legislation.

Chapter

Michael J. Allen and Ian Edwards

Course-focused and comprehensive, the Textbook on series provides an accessible overview of the key areas on the law curriculum. This chapter discusses the main non-fatal offences involving violence against the person. Non-fatal offences include assault and battery, assault occasioning actual bodily harm, wounding and inflicting grievous bodily harm, wounding or causing grievous bodily harm with intent, administering poison, and offences related to explosive substances and corrosive fluids (including offences related to ‘acid attacks’). The chapter analyses in detail consent as a defence to non-fatal offences against the person, including discussion of recent case law on whether consent is a defence to acts of ‘body modification’. The chapter also outlines necessity and lawful correction. The chapter’s Law in Context feature examines the scope of ‘hate crime’ legislation.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the provisions of criminal law for non-fatal offences against the person in Great Britain, which include assault, battery, malicious wounding, grievous bodily harm, and racially and religiously aggravated assaults. It examines the distinction between these major offences against the person and discusses the actus reus and mens rea elements of them. The chapter evaluates the use of the consent and lawful chastisement in legal defence, analyses the relevant provisions of the Harassment Act 1997 and the new offence of coercive control, and reviews some recent reform proposals. It also provides examples of related cases and comments on the bases of court decisions on each of them.

Chapter

Burglary is an offence under the Theft Act 1968. The offence is not confined to ‘breaking and entering’ in order to steal, but involves entering any building or part of a building as a trespasser and with intent to steal anything in the building or inflict or attempt to inflict on any person therein any grievous bodily harm. A separate form of burglary is found in s 9(1)(b) of the Theft Act 1968 where a person has entered as a trespasser and thereafter attempted to steal, actually stolen something, inflicted grievous bodily harm or attempted to inflict grievous bodily harm. This chapter looks at burglary and related offences, and also discusses aggravated burglary and the articles of aggravation, as well as trespass with intent to commit a sexual offence.

Chapter

David Ormerod and Karl Laird

Burglary is an offence under the Theft Act 1968. The offence is not confined to ‘breaking and entering’ in order to steal, but involves entering any building or part of a building as a trespasser and with intent to steal anything in the building or inflict or attempt to inflict on any person therein any grievous bodily harm. A separate form of burglary is found in s 9(1)(b) of the Theft Act 1968 where a person has entered as a trespasser and thereafter attempted to steal, actually stole something, inflicted grievous bodily harm or attempted to inflict grievous bodily harm. This chapter looks at burglary and related offences and also discusses aggravated burglary and the articles of aggravation, as well as trespass with intent to commit a sexual offence.

Chapter

Titles in the Core Text series take the reader straight to the heart of the subject, providing focused, concise, and reliable guides for students at all levels. This chapter covers the offence of corporate manslaughter. Murder and manslaughter are the most common homicide offences in English law. The killing of a person is the actus reus of both murder and manslaughter. Murder is deliberately causing death or grievous bodily harm. A person is guilty of constructive manslaughter if he/she causes death by an intentional, unlawful, and dangerous act. Many proposals for reform resulted in the Coroners and Justice Act 2009 reforms, although these were different to the Law Commission proposals.

Chapter

This chapter discusses the provisions of criminal law for non-fatal offences against the person in England and Wales, which include assault, battery, malicious wounding, grievous bodily harm, and racially and religiously aggravated assaults. It examines the distinctions between these major offences against the person and discusses their actus reus and mens rea elements. The chapter evaluates the use of consent and lawful chastisement in legal defence, analyses the relevant provisions of the Protection from Harassment Act 1997 and the offences of coercive control and strangulation, and reviews recent reform proposals. It also provides examples of related cases and comments on the bases of court decisions on each of them.