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Chapter

Jennifer Seymour, Clare Firth, Lucy Crompton, Helen Fox, Frances Seabridge, Susan Wigglesworth, and Elizabeth Smart

This chapter discusses the law and practice relating to the administration and winding up of an estate once the court has issued the grant. It considers the duties and powers of personal representatives; administering the estate; and distributing the estate.

Chapter

Clare Firth, Jennifer Seymour, Lucy Crompton, Helen Fox, Frances Seabridge, Jennifer Seymour, and Elizabeth Smart

This chapter discusses the law and practice relating to the administration and winding up of an estate once the court has issued the grant. It considers the duties and powers of personal representatives; administering the estate; and distributing the estate.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Land Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Re Ellenborough Park [1956] Ch 131, Court of Appeal. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Aruna Nair.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Land Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Re Ellenborough Park [1956] Ch 131, Court of Appeal. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Aruna Nair.

Chapter

Essential Cases: Land Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Re Ellenborough Park [1956] Ch 131, Court of Appeal. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Aruna Nair.

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Course-focused and comprehensive, the Textbook on Land Law provides an accessible overview of one key area on the law curriculum. This chapter discusses easements and profits à prendre. It explains the nature of easements and profits; legal and equitable interests; enforcement against acquirer of the servient tenement; acquisition by express grant or reservation; acquisition by implied grant or reservation; acquisition by express grant by virtue of the Law of Property Act 1925, s. 62; acquisition by prescription; remedies which may be used to protect an easement or profit; and the extinguishment of easements and profits.

Chapter

Jennifer Seymour, Clare Firth, Lucy Crompton, Helen Fox, Frances Seabridge, Susan Wigglesworth, and Elizabeth Smart

This chapter discusses the law and procedure relating to the issue of a grant of representation to the personal representatives of someone who has died. It considers the nature, effect, and the principal types of grant; the position of the personal representatives; the responsibilities of solicitors instructed to act in the administration of an estate; obtaining the grant; the court’s requirements; Statement of Truth for executors, for administrators with will annexed and for administrators; HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) requirements; excepted estates; Form IHT 400 and its Schedules; and the calculation of inheritance tax (IHT).

Chapter

Clare Firth, Jennifer Seymour, Lucy Crompton, Helen Fox, Frances Seabridge, Jennifer Seymour, and Elizabeth Smart

This chapter discusses the law and procedure relating to the issue of a grant of representation to the personal representatives of someone who has died. It considers the nature, effect, and the principal types of grant; the position of the personal representatives; the responsibilities of solicitors instructed to act in the administration of an estate; obtaining the grant; the court’s requirements; the Probate Application; HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) requirements; excepted estates; Form IHT 400 and its Schedules; and the calculation of inheritance tax (IHT).

Chapter

Titles in the Complete series combine extracts from a wide range of primary materials with clear explanatory text to provide readers with a complete introductory resource. This chapter discusses the rules on the creation of an easement. Topics covered include express grant of easements (and profits); express reservation of easements (and profits); implied grant of easements (and profits), which includes ways of necessity, intended easements, the rule in Wheeldon v Burrows, and s62 of the Law of Property Act 1925; implied reservation of easements covering necessity and intended easements; exclusion of the rules providing for implied grant and reservation; compulsory purchase and the rules for implied grant; and simultaneous sales or bequests.

Chapter

Titles in the Complete series combine extracts from a wide range of primary materials with clear explanatory text to provide readers with a complete introductory resource. This chapter discusses the rules on the creation of an easement. Topics covered include express grant of easements (and profits); express reservation of easements (and profits); implied grant of easements (and profits), which includes ways of necessity, intended easements, the rule in Wheeldon v Burrows and s62 of the Law of Property Act 1925; implied reservation of easements covering necessity and intended easements; exclusion of the rules providing for implied grant and reservation; compulsory purchase and the rules for implied grant; and simultaneous sales or bequests.

Chapter

Titles in the Complete series combine extracts from a wide range of primary materials with clear explanatory text to provide readers with a complete introductory resource. This chapter discusses the characteristics of an easement: there must be a dominant and a servient tenement; the easement must accommodate the dominant tenement; the easement must be owned or occupied by different people; and an easement must be capable of forming the subject matter of a grant. All four characteristics must exist for a right claimed to be an easement. If any one of those is missing, then the right is not an easement.

Chapter

Titles in the Complete series combine extracts from a wide range of primary materials with clear explanatory text to provide readers with a complete introductory resource. This chapter discusses the characteristics of an easement: there must be a dominant and a servient tenement; the easement must accommodate the dominant tenement; the easement must be owned or occupied by different people; and an easement must be capable of forming the subject matter of a grant. All four characteristics must exist for a right claimed to be an easement. If any one of those is missing, then the right is not an easement.

Chapter

This chapter examines the European Union (EU) law concerning the right to receive services under Article 56 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU). The chapter considers the dividing line between those services which are provided for remuneration and publicly funded services—these include education (including scholarships and grants) and healthcare (including in the context of the Patients’ Directive). It focuses on the jurisprudence of the Court of Justice (CJ) in which it has developed a number of mechanisms to extend rights for those who have moved to receive services.

Chapter

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. This chapter discusses easements. An easement gives either a positive or, less often, a negative right of use over land of another (the servient land), which must be seen to benefit a dominant piece of land. A right that is capable of being an easement will only become an easement where it has been acquired by one of the recognised methods of acquisition. Easements may arise through express or implied acquisition. Implied acquisition may arise by virtue of necessity, common intention, operation of s 62 Law of Property Act (LPA) 1925 or under the rule in Wheeldon v Burrows (although the latter two methods will not operate in a reservation scenario). Alternatively, an easement may have been acquired out of long use, known as prescription, of which there are three modes: common law, lost modern grant, and the Prescription Act 1832. An easement can be either legal or equitable in status, depending upon which formalities have been satisfied. The status of an easement will determine the relevant rules governing the enforcement of that interest against a third party.

Chapter

All books in this flagship series contain carefully selected substantial extracts from key cases, legislation, and academic debate, providing able students with a stand-alone resource. This chapter is concerned with easements. An easement is the proprietary right to enjoy limited use of the land of another, which may exist in both positive and negative form. To constitute an easement, a right over the land of another must display certain characteristics. If these characteristics are not present, the right over the land of another is merely a personal right. An easement may be created by express, implied, or presumed grant. As a proprietary right, an easement is not easy to extinguish, but, in the case of freehold land, easement will be extinguished where the dominant and servient land come into common ownership and an easement attached to a lease may sometimes be extinguished upon the termination of that lease.

Chapter

Ben McFarlane, Nicholas Hopkins, and Sarah Nield

All books in this flagship series contain carefully selected substantial extracts from key cases, legislation, and academic debate, providing able students with a stand-alone resource. This chapter is concerned with easements. An easement is the proprietary right to enjoy limited use of the land of another, which may exist in both positive and negative form. To constitute an easement, a right over the land of another must display certain characteristics. If these characteristics are not present, the right over the land of another is merely a personal right. An easement may be created by express, implied, or presumed grant. As a proprietary right, an easement is not easy to extinguish but in the case of freehold land, easement will be extinguished where the dominant and servient land come into common ownership, and an easement attached to a lease may sometimes be extinguished upon the termination of that lease.

Chapter

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. This chapter discusses easements. An easement gives either a positive or, less often, a negative right of use over land of another (the servient land), which must be seen to benefit a dominant piece of land. A right that is capable of being an easement will only become an easement where it has been acquired by one of the recognised methods of acquisition. Easements may arise through express or implied acquisition. Implied acquisition may arise by virtue of necessity, common intention, operation of s 62 Law of Property Act (LPA) 1925, or under the rule in Wheeldon v Burrows (although the latter two methods will not operate in a reservation scenario). Alternatively, an easement may have been acquired out of long use, known as prescription, of which there are three modes: common law, lost modern grant, and the Prescription Act 1832. An easement can be either legal or equitable in status, depending upon which formalities have been satisfied. The status of an easement will determine the relevant rules governing the enforcement of that interest against a third party.

Chapter

Titles in the Complete series combine extracts from a wide range of primary materials with clear explanatory text to provide readers with a complete introductory resource. This chapter discusses the basic principles of the law of leases, or ‘landlord and tenant’ law, as it is sometimes called. It covers the essential requirements for a lease; duration of leases and certainty of term; some concepts related to the law of leases; the distinction between leases and licences; how exclusive possession is defined; shared and multiple occupation cases; ‘sham’ tenancies and pretence clauses designed to negate exclusive possession; and formalities for the creation of leases.

Chapter

Titles in the Complete series combine extracts from a wide range of primary materials with clear explanatory text to provide readers with a complete introductory resource. This chapter discusses rules common to all three forms of prescription; user ‘as of right’ (without force, without secrecy and without permission), presumed acquiescence, user must be continuous, user must be by or on behalf of a fee simple against a fee simple, and user must be against a servient owner capable of granting an easement; prescription at common law; prescription by lost modern grant; prescription under the Prescription Act 1832; prescriptive easements and profits as legal interests; and extinguishment of easements.

Chapter

Titles in the Complete series combine extracts from a wide range of primary materials with clear explanatory text to provide readers with a complete introductory resource. This chapter discusses the changes made by the 1925 legislation. It covers legal estate and interests prior to 1925; s1 Law of Property Act 1925; legal estates and interests existing after 1925; and equitable interests after 1925. The creation of legal and equitable property rights is discussed; also the creation and transfer of legal property rights; the creation of equitable interests in land by express trust; the creation of equitable interests by contract to convey or create a legal estate or interest; treating an informal grant of rights in land as a contract, thus creating an equitable interest in land; grant of an estate or interest by someone with only an equitable interest; and grants of interests which can exist only in equity.