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Chapter

Cover Business Law

13. Responsibilities of Employers for the Torts of Employees and Statutory Duties  

This chapter identifies the doctrine of vicarious liability and its potential impact on employers. An employer faces vicarious liability when an individual engaged by it to perform some function for the business commits a tort; if this occurs within the course of employment and the individual engaged has the employment status of an employee, the employer may be jointly liable with the tortfeasor. The doctrine was developed, through the courts, to ensure that injured persons are compensated for losses sustained as a result of a negligent or wrongful act, with the obligation being placed on the employer to compensate and further to prevent any future torts being committed. The chapter considers the liability of those producing, supplying, marketing, and importing goods that contain defects which cause damage or loss.

Chapter

Cover Introduction to Business Law

13. The Contract of Employment and its Termination  

This chapter discusses the contract of employment and its termination. It considers the difference between an employee, an employee shareholder, an independent contractor, and a worker, and the tests used to establish their status. It discusses the types of implied terms contained in a contract of employment. The chapter also considers termination of a contract of employment, examining the difference between unfair, constructive, and wrongful dismissal. It looks at claims for unfair dismissal, considering the potentially fair reasons for dismissal, the band of reasonable responses, the automatically unfair reasons for dismissal, and the remedies available where unfair dismissal has occurred. The chapter concludes with a discussion of redundancy.

Chapter

Cover Selwyn's Law of Employment

2. The Nature of a Contract of Employment  

This chapter discusses the parties to a contract of employment, the distinction between employees, workers and self-employed persons, and other categories of parties to a contract of employment, looking at the different types of employment status and the tests used to decide which category a person falls into. It includes the status of directors, partners, office holders, ministers of religion, and the police, as well as apprentices, posted workers, domestic servants, and those working abroad and in offshore employment. It also looks at employee shareholders and has a discussion of whether people working in the ‘gig economy’ are workers or employees. Further, the chapter looks at those on fixed-term contracts and agency workers. It also summarises the new IR35 regime and looks at modern slavery.

Chapter

Cover Business Law

19. Hiring Staff and Establishing the Contract of Employment  

This chapter discusses how employment relations affect all business organizations and why it is especially important to identify the status of individuals engaged in employment. It begins by considering the regulation of the employment relationship and identifies the tests to establish the employment status of individuals, as well as the reasons behind the significance of the distinction between an employee and independent contractor. The three common law tests that have been used to determine employee status—control, integration, and mixed or economic reality—are identified, and how it is most appropriate, in applying the tests, to begin with those established in Montgomery v Johnson Underwood, and then proceed to the final question in Ready Mixed Concrete. The chapter also identifies the terms implied into contracts of employment and the obligations these place on the involved parties.

Chapter

Cover Employment Law

3. Barriers to employment rights  

UK employment law does not give equal protection to everyone considered to be working for an employer. In fact, a substantial minority of people who work for private firms, companies and public sector organisations do not enjoy the protection of employment law in some significant respects. There are four types of situation that often deny people the opportunity to bring their claims to court: when a claimant is not considered to be an employee; when a claimant is not considered to be a worker; when a claimant (who is an employee) has not completed sufficient continuous service with their employer; and when a claimant is found not to be working legally in the UK. In addition, employment tribunals operate strict limits on how soon after someone is dismissed or suffers from an instance of unlawful discrimination they make a claim if they want it to be heard. For most tribunal jurisdictions this time limit is set at three months, meaning that after this period has passed a claim cannot be considered because it is ‘out of time’. In practice this rule can also act as a fifth type of barrier preventing people from accessing their employment rights. This chapter focuses on these five types of situations.

Book

Cover Concentrate Questions and Answers Employment Law
The Concentrate Questions and Answers series offers the best preparation for law students tackling exam questions. Each book includes typical questions, bullet-pointed answer plans, suggested answers, author commentary, and illustrative diagrams and flowcharts. This book offers clear advice on what to expect in typical employment law exams. It addresses a wide range of employment law topics that are most often encountered in employment law courses, including questions on ‘mixed’ topics. The book provides sample essay and problem questions to allow students to practise and refine exam skills. These are supported by suggested answers and diagram plans. Detailed author commentary explains what examiners are looking for, traps to avoid, and how students can best achieve their potential. This book also includes separate chapters on skills and tips for success in both exams and in coursework assessments. It is an ideal tool to help support revision or to use throughout studies to help review learning.

Book

Cover Employment Law

Stephen Taylor and Astra Emir

Employment Law provides an introduction to the issues of employment law and regulation for those studying a variety of subjects including human resource management (HRM) and business management, as well as an easy explanation for students of law. Case exhibits in every chapter illustrate employment law in action, whilst activities test understanding of the law and its application in the real world. In addition, a dedicated, very practical chapter on preparing and presenting a case gives an opportunity to demonstrate understanding using a fictional scenario, through which a greater insight into the challenges faced before an employment tribunal can be gleamed. This fifth edition includes full coverage of the Taylor Report, the Gender Pay Gap Regulations, GDPR/Data Protection Act 2018, the Trade Union Act 2016 and the likely effect of Brexit. The text also encompasses a revision of core legal content including changes to tribunal fees and case law concerning employment status.

Chapter

Cover Business Law Concentrate

7. Employment I: employment status, equal pay, and equality  

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. This chapter reviews the law on the employment contract, employment status, equal pay, and equality. Individuals may be engaged as workers, but their employment status will most commonly be as an employee or independent contractor. Employment status is significant in relation to the rights and obligations each type of contract has for the individual and employer. Given the lack of an adequate statutory definition, the common law has developed tests to identify employment status. Employment contracts contain express and implied terms. Employees and people employed personally to perform work under a contract are protected against various forms of discrimination and enjoy enforceable rights to equality at work.