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Chapter

Cover Business Law

16. Duties Relating to Corporation Finance and Capital  

This chapter discusses the details of the various obligations on companies that wish to issue and allot shares, provide debentures and charges over the company’s assets, and provide guidance on the maintenance of the company’s finances. It continues from the discussion of the administration of the company to consider the broad issue of corporate governance and identifies how a company may raise capital, while also considering the obligations placed on the directors to protect and maintain the capital of the company for its members. To appreciate the effects of the Companies Act (CA) 2006 on companies, it is important to understand the rules regarding the issuing of shares and granting of debentures to protect the company and the creditors from abuse, and how dividends are to be agreed upon and provided to shareholders.

Chapter

Cover Sealy & Worthington's Text, Cases, and Materials in Company Law

13. Raising Debt Capital: Borrowing, Debentures and Charges  

This chapter discusses the rules which govern distribution of the company’s assets to its shareholders and the rules which ensure that a company’s legal capital is maintained in the company’s hands. It covers: controls over a company’s distribution of capital; permitted reductions of capital; redemptions and repurchases of shares; financial assistance by a company for the acquisition of its own shares; and dividend distributions.

Chapter

Cover Company Law

17. The maintenance of capital  

This chapter addresses what is known as the capital maintenance doctrine—a series of rules designed to protect the company’s creditors by ensuring that capital is maintained and not returned to the company’s members. Any limited company can reduce its share capital by passing a special resolution followed by court confirmation. A private company can reduce its share capital by passing a special resolution supported by a solvency statement. On the other hand, public companies are generally prohibited from providing financial assistance to others to acquire their shares. Meanwhile, a company can generally only pay a dividend out of distributable profits. The typical three-stage process for paying dividends is that the directors recommend an amount to be distributed by way of dividend; the company declares the dividend by passing an ordinary resolution; and the dividend is paid out.

Chapter

Cover Company Law Concentrate

7. Capital and capital maintenance  

This chapter discusses the two principal types of capital that companies acquire: share capital (capital obtained by selling shares) and debt capital (capital borrowed from others). Having obtained share capital through the selling of shares, the law requires that the company ‘maintain’ that capital by not distributing it in unauthorized ways, notably by prohibiting companies from returning capital to the shareholders prior to liquidation.

Chapter

Cover Company Law Concentrate

7. Capital and capital maintenance  

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. This chapter discusses the two principal types of capital that companies acquire: share capital (capital obtained by selling shares) and debt capital (capital borrowed from others). Having obtained share capital through the selling of shares, the law requires that the company ‘maintain’ that capital by not distributing it in unauthorized ways, notably by prohibiting companies from returning capital to the shareholders prior to liquidation.

Chapter

Cover Company Law

7. Share capital  

Titles in the Core Text series take the reader straight to the heart of the subject, providing focused, concise, and reliable guides for students at all levels. This chapter examines how company law governs maintenance of a company’s share capital, with emphasis on the distinction between private and public companies. It also discusses various ways in which shareholders might legally receive funds (‘distributions’) from the company, including issuance of shares and payment of shares in kind (that is, goods, property, or services rather than in cash). The relevance of the nominal value of shares issued to shareholders, the issue of paying dividends to shareholders, and disguised return of capital to shareholders are considered as well. The chapter also examines two other means of returning funds to shareholders, reduction of share capital and redemption or purchase by a company of its own shares, before concluding with an assessment of the prohibition and the exceptions concerning the issue of financial assistance for the acquisition of shares in a public company.

Chapter

Cover Concentrate Questions and Answers Company Law

4. Shares and Shareholders  

The Concentrate Questions and Answers series offers the best preparation for tackling exam questions and coursework. Each book includes typical questions, suggested answers with commentary, illustrative diagrams, guidance on how to develop your answer, suggestions for further reading, and advice on exams and coursework. Shareholders in a company own shares, but the nature of a share and the rights of a shareholder are not easily defined. This chapter discusses the definition and characteristics of a share; the differences between different types of share, particularly ordinary and preference shares; allotment of shares and pre-emption rights; return of capital; and variation of class rights.

Chapter

Cover Company Law

22. The doctrine of capital maintenance  

This chapter discusses the doctrine of capital maintenance which precludes the return of capital, directly or indirectly, to the shareholders ahead of a winding up of the company. The discussion covers the purchase and redemption of a company’s own shares, reduction of capital, distributions to the members, and financial assistance by a company for the acquisition of its own shares. Purchase and redemption schemes (buy-backs) are common transactions and are discussed in detail as is the procedure for a reduction of capital. The key issue for creditors, however, is the risk posed by distributions to members and much of the chapter is devoted to discussing the distribution rules laid down in CA 2006, Part 23 and the common law. The chapter discusses the rules as to distributable profits and the liability of directors in the case of improper distributions and, in particular, their liability for dividends improperly declared.

Chapter

Cover Concentrate Questions and Answers Company Law

9. Share Capital  

The Concentrate Questions and Answers series offers the best preparation for tackling exam questions and coursework. Each book includes typical questions, suggested answers with commentary, illustrative diagrams, guidance on how to develop your answer, suggestions for further reading, and advice on exams and coursework. This chapter examines the law on share capital for public and private companies. The doctrine of capital maintenance ensures that the company has raised the capital it claims to have raised; and that the capital is not subsequently returned, directly or indirectly, to the shareholders. There is a great deal of (mainly statutory) law surrounding this doctrine This chapter considers the capital maintenance doctrine itself and many related topics, including: the issue of shares for non-cash consideration, issue of shares at a discount, reduction of capital, purchase of a company’s own shares, redeemable shares, payment of dividends, and financial assistance by a company for the purchase of its own shares.