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Chapter

Cover Business Law

10. Ending the Contract  

This chapter discusses other ways in which a valid contract may be discharged, aside from the successful completion of established rights and duties. It also discusses possible remedies where a party breaches the contract. Under the normal rules of contract, a party is only discharged from a contract when that party has completed obligations under it. Having completed the contract each party is free of further obligations. A failure to complete the contract may lead to a breach of contract claim, although situations exist where the parties may release each other from further obligation—referred to as discharge by agreement—or the contract may have been partially or substantially performed. This chapter examines discharge through performance and agreement, how contracts may become frustrated, and the consequences and remedies following a breach of contract.

Chapter

Cover Card & James' Business Law

11. Discharge of the contract  

This chapter examines the procedures and processes involved in the discharge of a contract. It describes the situations under which a contract will become discharged and discusses the four methods of discharge, namely discharge by performance, discharge by agreement, discharge by breach, and discharge by frustration. This chapter also explains that there are cases where a contract will be automatically discharged with no possibility of continuance (such as where the contract is discharged by frustration) and there are those where the actions of one party may result in the other party being entitled to terminate the contract (for example, breach of a condition) or may simply entitle him to recover damages only (for example, breach of a warranty).

Chapter

Cover Anson's Law of Contract

16. Discharge by Operation of Law  

Jack Beatson, Andrew Burrows, and John Cartwright

This chapter considers the rules of law which, operating upon certain sets of circumstances, will bring about the discharge of a contract. The discussions cover mergers, discharged by judgment of a court, alteration or cancellation of a written instrument, and bankruptcy.

Chapter

Cover Anson's Law of Contract

15. Discharge for Breach  

Jack Beatson, Andrew Burrows, and John Cartwright

If one of the parties to a contract breaches an obligation which the contract imposes, that party is in breach of contract. The breach may consist in the non-performance of the relevant obligation, or its performance in a manner or at a time that fails to comply with the requirements of the contract. This chapter sets out the rules governing the discharge of a contract by breach. It shows that the breach may give rise to discharge only if it is sufficiently serious in its effects (a breach which ‘goes to the root of the contract’, or a ‘repudiation’ of the contract) or if it is a breach of a sufficiently serious term of the contract (breach of ‘condition’).

Chapter

Cover O'Sullivan & Hilliard's The Law of Contract

15. Discharge of a contract for breach  

Titles in the Core Text series take the reader straight to the heart of the subject, providing focused, concise, and reliable guides for students at all levels. This chapter examines the circumstances in which a contract can be terminated or discharged by one party following breach or incomplete performance by the other party, covering entire obligations. It explains that breach of contract does not automatically bring a contract to an end and that termination of a contract for breach is not the same as rescission. This chapter also discusses the two sorts of situation in which the innocent party can terminate the contract for the other party’s breach, namely breach of condition or serious breach of an innominate term, and following repudiation, and considers the innocent party’s option to elect whether to terminate the contract or keep it alive.

Chapter

Cover Contract Law Concentrate

5. Terms and breach of contract  

Each Concentrate revision guide is packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more. Concentrates show you what to expect in a law exam, what examiners are looking for, and how to achieve extra marks. This chapter discusses how to identify the contractual obligations assumed by the parties in their contract, distinguishing terms (promises) and representations (non-promissory inducements to contract), and identifying the express and implied terms. It also looks at standards of performance, how to identify broken promises as a prelude to considering the remedies for breach of contract, and whether it is possible to opt not to continue to perform further contractual obligations following the other party’s breach.

Chapter

Cover Poole's Textbook on Contract Law

13. Breach of contract  

Robert Merkin, Séverine Saintier, and Jill Poole

Course-focused and comprehensive, Poole’s Textbook on Contract Law provides an accessible overview of the key areas on the law curriculum. There are four ways to discharge a contract: by performance, agreement, frustration, or breach. The standard of performance required in relation to each contractual obligation needs to be identified because a failure to perform to the required standard constitutes a breach. In the absence of lawful excuse, a breach of contract arises if a party either fails or refuses to perform a contractual obligation imposed on that party by the terms of the contract or performs a contractual obligation in a defective manner. While every breach of contract will give rise to a right to claim damages, the contract will remain in force unless the breach constitutes a repudiatory breach. The chapter examines the types of repudiatory breaches and the election to terminate or affirm, together with an assessment of the law governing the identification of a repudiatory breach and the consequences of terminating when the breach is not in fact repudiatory. It also examines the options available to the non-breaching party when an anticipatory breach occurs.