1-4 of 4 Results

  • Keyword: diplomatic relations x
Clear all

Chapter

Cover Brownlie's Principles of Public International Law

17. Diplomatic and consular relations  

The rules of international law governing diplomatic relations are the product of long-established state practice reflected in treaties, national legislation, and judicial decisions, as codified in the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations. This chapter discusses the general legal aspects of diplomatic relations; staff, premises, and facilities of missions; inviolability of missions; diplomatic agents; consular relations; special missions; and crimes against internationally protected persons.

Chapter

Cover International Law

12. Immunities Enjoyed by Officials of States and International Organizations  

Chanaka Wickremasinghe

This chapter examines the immunities enjoyed by various categories of officials of States and international organizations. It identifies jurisdictional immunity as one of the key legal techniques by which diplomatic relations and, more broadly, international relations and cooperation can be maintained. It recognises that recent developments in international law have increasingly required that immunities be scrutinised and justified, particularly where they impact on individual rights. Among the most striking of such challenges to immunities are those that have arisen in relation to measures which seek to bring an end to the impunity of persons who commit the most serious international crimes, including measures such as the development of extraterritorial jurisdiction and the establishment of international criminal tribunals. A range of judicial decisions is reviewed in order to determine how international law has attempted to reconcile such conflicting priorities in this respect.

Chapter

Cover International Law

18. The Means of Dispute Settlement  

John Merrills

This chapter discusses the various methods available for the peaceful settlement of international disputes. These include diplomatic methods (negotiation, mediation, inquiry, and conciliation), and legal methods (arbitration, the International Court of Justice, other courts and tribunals, and the place of legal methods). The role of the United Nations and regional organizations is also considered. Discussion covers the role of international law and its place in international relations, and dispute settlement generally. The text is illustrated with analysis of current and past disputes in which the various methods have been used—either successfully or unsuccessfully. The historical record shows first, that over the last two hundred years huge progress has been made in developing and refining the methods for handling international disputes, and secondly, that despite, or perhaps because of, differences between the various methods, their interaction and use in combination are often important factors in determining their effectiveness in practice.

Chapter

Cover International Law

11. Diplomatic protection and issues of standing  

This chapter discusses the notion of ‘diplomatic protection’, or the idea that a State may espouse the claims of its nationals and claim on their behalf. Because diplomatic protection by a State to persons necessarily extends beyond its territory, its exercise has potential ramifications for the sovereignty of other States. Certain rules have therefore emerged to avoid the uncomfortable situation where States submit legal claims as a strategic tool in international relations. Many of these are reflected in the Articles on Diplomatic Protection proposed by the International Law Commission (ILC) in 2006. In such situations, even if locus standi or ‘standing’ can be established, the admissibility of a claim before an international tribunal is precluded. The chapter then studies the rules relating to the admissibility of claims of diplomatic protection.