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Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Contract Law

Attorney General v Blake & another [2000] UKHL 45; [2001] 1 AC 268  

Essential Cases: Contract Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Attorney General v Blake & another [2000] UKHL 45; [2001] 1 AC 268. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Nicola Jackson.

Chapter

Cover Essential Cases: Contract Law 5e

Attorney General v Blake & another [2000] UKHL 45; [2001] 1 AC 268  

Essential Cases: Contract Law provides a bridge between course textbooks and key case judgments. This case document summarizes the facts and decision in Attorney General v Blake & another [2000] UKHL 45; [2001] 1 AC 268. The document also includes supporting commentary from author Nicola Jackson.

Chapter

Cover Contract Law Directions

12. Specific remedies  

Without assuming prior legal knowledge, books in the Directions series introduce and guide readers through key points of law and legal debate. Questions, diagrams and exercises help readers to engage fully with each subject and check their understanding as they progress. This chapter considers remedies that directly address the issue of providing the innocent party with the performance that was expected. Their use depends on a number of factors, which means that they are not universally available, and that the claimant will therefore often be left to his remedy in damages. The discussions cover actions for the price or other agreed sum, the rule in White and Carter v McGregor, affirmation and anticipatory breach. The chapter goes on to discuss specific performance and injunctions and the tests of damages being inadequate, mutuality plus other factors such as personal service contracts and the relevance of the need for supervision.

Chapter

Cover Contract Law Directions

12. Specific remedies  

Without assuming prior legal knowledge, books in the Directions series introduce and guide readers through key points of law and legal debate. Questions, diagrams and exercises help readers to engage fully with each subject and check their understanding as they progress. This chapter considers remedies that directly address the issue of providing the innocent party with the performance that was expected. Their use depends on a number of factors, which means that they are not universally available, and that the claimant will therefore often be left to his remedy in damages. The discussions cover actions for the price or other agreed sum, the rule in White and Carter v McGregor, affirmation and anticipatory breach. The chapter goes on to discuss specific performance and injunctions and the tests of damages being inadequate, mutuality plus other factors such as personal service contracts and the relevance of the need for supervision.